Fwd: World March of Women - WORLD DEMANDS

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Thu, 21 Oct 1999 17:05:56 -0800


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World March of Women in the Year 2000
July 1999

WORLD DEMANDS


Demands to eliminate poverty

P-1 That all States adopt a legal framework and strategies aimed at=20
eliminating poverty.

States must implement national anti-poverty policies, programs,=20
action plans and projects including specific measures to eliminate=20
women's poverty and to ensure their economic and social independence=20
through the exercise of their right to:
=B7 education;
=B7 employment, with statutory protection for work in the home and in=20
the informal sectors of the economy;
=B7 pay equity and equality at the national and international levels;
=B7 association and unionisation;
=B7 property and control of safe water;
=B7 decent housing;
=B7 health care and social protection;
=B7 culture;
=B7 life-long income security;
=B7 natural and economic resources (credit, property, vocational=20
training, technologies);
=B7 full citizenship, including in particular recognition of civil=20
identity and access to relevant documents (identity card);
=B7 minimum social wage.

States must guarantee, as a fundamental right, the production and=20
distribution of food to ensure food security for their populations.

States must develop incentives to promote the sharing of family=20
responsibilities (education and care of children and domestic tasks)=20
and must provide concrete support to families such as day-care=20
adapted to parents' work schedules, community kitchens, programs to=20
assist children with their schoolwork, and so on.

States must promote women's access to decision-making positions.

States must ratify and observe the labour standards of the=20
International Labour Office (ILO). They must enforce compliance with=20
national labour standards in free trade zones.

States and international organizations must take measures to fight=20
and prevent corruption.

All acts, legislation, regulations and positions taken by governments=20
will be assessed in the light of indicators such as the human poverty=20
index (HPI), introduced in the Human Development Report 1997; the=20
human development index (HDI), put forth by the United Nations=20
Development Programme; the gender-related development index=20
(including an indicator on the representation of women in positions=20
of power) discussed in the Human Development Report 1995, and=20
Convention 169 of the International Labour Organization particularly=20
as it concerns Indigenous and tribal peoples' rights.

States must put an end to the process of homogenization of culture=20
and the commodification of women in media to suit the needs of the=20
market.

States must make provisions to ensure women's equal participation in=20
political decision-making bodies.

States must take all possible steps to end patriarchal values and=20
sensitize the society towards democratization of the family=20
structure. 1

P-2 The urgent implementation of measures such as:

P-2 a) the Tobin Tax; revenue from the tax would be paid into a special fund=
:
=B7 earmarked for social development;
=B7 managed democratically by the international community as a whole;
=B7 according to criteria respecting fundamental human rights and democracy;
=B7 with equal representation of women and men;
=B7 to which women (who represent 70% of the 1.3 billion people living=20
in extreme poverty) would have preferred access.

P-2 b) investment of 0.7% of the rich countries' gross national=20
product (GNP) in aid for developing countries;

P-2 c) adequate financing and democratization of United Nations=20
programs that are essential to defend women's and children's=20
fundamental rights, UNIFEM (UN Women's Programme), UNDP (United=20
Nations Development Programme) and UNICEF (UN children's fund);

P-2 d) an end to structural adjustment programs;

P-2 e) an end to cutbacks in social budgets and public services;

P-2 f) rejection of the proposed Multilateral Agreement on Investment (MAI).

P-3 Cancellation of the debt of all Third World countries, taking=20
into account the principles of responsibility, transparency of=20
information and accountability.

We demand the immediate cancellation of the debt of the 53 poorest=20
countries on the planet, in support of the objectives of the Jubilee=20
2000 campaign.

In the longer term, we demand the cancellation of the debt of all=20
Third World countries and the setting up of a mechanism to monitor=20
the debt write-off, ensuring that this money is employed to eliminate=20
poverty and to further the well-being of people most affected by=20
structural adjustment programs, the majority of whom are women and=20
girls.

P- 4 The implementation of the 20/20 formula between donor countries=20
and the recipients of international aid.

In this scheme, 20% of the sum contributed by the donor country must=20
be allocated to social development and 20% of the receiving=20
government's spending must be used for social programs.

P-5 A non-monolithic world political organization, with authority=20
over the economy and egalitarian and democratic representation of all=20
countries on earth (ensuring parity between poor countries and rich=20
countries) and equal representation of women and men.

This organization must have real decision-making power and authority=20
to act in order to implement a world economic system that is fair,=20
participatory and where solidarity plays a key role. The following=20
measures must be instituted immediately:

A World Council for Economic and Financial Security, which would be=20
in charge of redefining the rules for a new international financial=20
system based on the fair and equitable distribution of the planet's=20
wealth. Rooted in social justice, it would also focus on increasing=20
the well-being of the world population, particularly women, who make=20
up over half that population. Gender parity should be observed in the=20
composition of the Council's membership. Membership must also be=20
comprised of representatives of the civil society, for example NGOs,=20
unions, etc.) and must ensure parity of representation between=20
countries from the North and South.
=B7 Any ratification of trade conventions and agreements must be=20
subordinated to individual and collective fundamental human rights.=20
Trade must be subordinated to human rights, not the other way around.
=B7 The elimination of tax havens.
=B7 The end of banking secrecy.
=B7 The redistribution of wealth held by the seven richest countries.
=B7 A protocol to ensure application of the International Covenant on=20
Economic, Social and Cultural Rights.

P-6 That the embargoes and blockades-principally affecting women and=20
children-imposed by the major powers on many countries, be lifted.

We reaffirm our commitment to peace and to the protection of the=20
democratic and autonomous operation of nation-states.2

Demands to eliminate violence against women


V-1 That governments claiming to be defenders of human rights condemn=20
any authority political, religious, economic or cultural that=20
controls women and girls, and denounce any regime that violates their=20
fundamental rights.

V-2 That States recognize, in their statutes and actions, that all=20
forms of violence against women are violations of fundamental human=20
rights and cannot be justified by any custom, religion, cultural=20
practice or political power. Therefore, all states must recognize a=20
woman's right to determine her own destiny, and to exercise control=20
over her body and reproductive function.

V-3 That States implement action plans, effective policies and=20
programs equipped with adequate financial and other means to end all=20
forms of violence against women.

These action plans must include the following elements in particular:=20
prevention; public education; prosecution; "treatment" for attackers;=20
research and statistics on all forms of violence against women;=20
assistance and protection for victims; campaigns against pornography,=20
procuring, and sexual assault, including child rape; non-sexist=20
education; easier access to the criminal justice system; and training=20
programs for judges and police.

V-4 That the United Nations bring extraordinary pressure to bear on=20
member States to ratify without reservation and implement the=20
conventions and covenants relating to the rights of women and=20
children, in particular, the International Covenant on Civil and=20
Political Rights, the Convention on the Elimination of All Forms of=20
Discrimination Against Women, the Convention on the Rights of the=20
Child, the Convention on the Elimination of All Forms of Racial=20
Discrimination, the International Convention on the Protection of the=20
Rights of All Migrant Workers and their Families.

That States harmonize their national laws with these international=20
human rights instruments as well as with the Universal Declaration of=20
Human Rights, the Declaration on the Elimination of Violence Against=20
Women, the Cairo and Vienna Declarations, and the Beijing Declaration=20
and Platform for Action.

V-5 That, as soon as possible, protocols be adopted (and=20
implementation mechanisms be established) for:
=B7 the Convention on the Elimination of all Forms of Discrimination=20
Against Women (CEDAW);
=B7 the Convention on the Rights of the Child.

These protocols will enable individuals and groups to bring=20
complaints against a State. These protocols are a means to exercise=20
international pressure on governments to implement the rights set out=20
in these covenants and conventions. Provisions must be made for=20
effective sanctions against non-compliant States.

V-6 That mechanisms be established to implement the 1949 Convention=20
for the Suppression of the Traffic in Persons and of the Exploitation=20
of the Prostitution of Others, taking into account recent relevant=20
documents such as the two resolutions of the United Nations General=20
Assembly (1996) concerning trafficking in women and girls and=20
violence against migrant women.

V-7 That States recognize the jurisdiction of the International=20
Criminal Court and conform in particular to the provisions,=20
especially those that define rape and sexual abuse as war crimes and=20
crimes against humanity.

V-8 That all States adopt and implement disarmament policies with=20
respect to conventional, nuclear and biological weapons.

That all countries ratify the Convention Against Land Mines.

That the United Nations end all forms of intervention, aggression and=20
military occupation, assure the right of refugees to return to their=20
homeland, and bring pressure to bear on governments to enforce the=20
observance of human rights and to resolve conflicts.3

V-9 That the right to asylum for women victims of sexist=20
discrimination and persecution and sexual violence be adopted as soon=20
possible.

The next two demands were supported by the majority of women present=20
at the International Preparatory meeting on the condition of a=20
country-by-country adoption process. Some delegates were not in a=20
position to be able to commit to publicly defending these demands in=20
their respective countries. They remain an integral part of the World=20
March of Women in the Year 2000. Over the next few months, the names=20
of adopting countries will be added.

V- 10 That, based on the principle of equality of all persons, the=20
United Nations and States of the international community recognize=20
formally that a person's sexual orientation shall not bar them from=20
the full exercise of the rights set out in the following=20
international instruments: the Universal Declaration of Human Rights,=20
the International Covenant on Civil and Political Rights, the=20
International Covenant on Economic, Social and Cultural Rights and=20
the Convention on the Elimination of All Forms of Discrimination=20
Against Women.

V-11 That the right to asylum for victims of discrimination and=20
persecution based on sexual orientation be adopted as soon as=20
possible.


NOTES
1 	At the International Preparatory meeting, the delegates=20
adopted the three above-mentioned demands without integrating them=20
into the two themes. The Special Newsletter listed them as "A", "B"=20
and "C" ; this Guide incorporates them into the whole.
2 	This demand was integrated to the whole after the Special=20
International Preparatory meeting. It was labelled "D" in the Special=20
Newsletter.
3 	These demands were integrated into the whole after the=20
International Preparatory meeting. They were labelled "E", "F" and=20
"G" in the Special Newsletter.

*******************************************************
HOMELESS PEOPLE'S NETWORK <http://aspin.asu.edu/hpn>
6,000+ POSTS by or via homeless & ex-homeless people
Nothing About Us Without Us - Democratize Public Policy
*******************************************************

chance martin
Coalition on Homelessness, San Francisco
468 Turk St.
San Francisco, CA 94102
vox: (415) 346.3740
=46ax: (415) 775.5639
coh@sfo.com
http://www.sfo.com/~coh
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HOMELESS PEOPLE'S VIEWS, News, Alerts, Actions & Research

6,000+ ONLINE POSTS by or via homeless & ex-homeless people

HOMELESS PEOPLE'S NETWORK http://aspin.asu.edu/hpn

***********************************************************

<fontfamily><param>Arial_Black</param><bigger>World March of Women in
the Year 2000

</bigger></fontfamily><fontfamily><param>Georgia</param><smaller>July
1999


</smaller></fontfamily><fontfamily><param>Arial_Black</param><bigger>WORLD
DEMANDS=20



</bigger>Demands to eliminate poverty=20


</fontfamily><bold><fontfamily><param>Georgia</param>P-1 That all
States adopt a legal framework and strategies aimed at eliminating
poverty.=20


</fontfamily></bold><fontfamily><param>Georgia</param>States must
implement national anti-poverty policies, programs, action plans and
projects including specific measures to eliminate women's poverty and
to ensure their economic and social independence through the exercise
of their right to:=20

=B7 education;=20

=B7 employment, with statutory protection for work in the home and in the
informal sectors of the economy;=20

=B7 pay equity and equality at the national and international levels;=20

=B7 association and unionisation;=20

=B7 property and control of safe water;=20

=B7 decent housing;=20

=B7 health care and social protection;=20

=B7 culture;=20

=B7 life-long income security;=20

=B7 natural and economic resources (credit, property, vocational
training, technologies);=20

=B7 full citizenship, including in particular recognition of civil
identity and access to relevant documents (identity card);=20

=B7 minimum social wage.=20


States must guarantee, as a fundamental right, the production and
distribution of food to ensure food security for their populations.=20


States must develop incentives to promote the sharing of family
responsibilities (education and care of children and domestic tasks)
and must provide concrete support to families such as day-care adapted
to parents' work schedules, community kitchens, programs to assist
children with their schoolwork, and so on.=20

 =20

States must promote women's access to decision-making positions.=20


States must ratify and observe the labour standards of the
International Labour Office (ILO). They must enforce compliance with
national labour standards in free trade zones.=20


States and international organizations must take measures to fight and
prevent corruption.=20


All acts, legislation, regulations and positions taken by governments
will be assessed in the light of indicators such as the human poverty
index (HPI), introduced in the Human Development Report 1997; the human
development index (HDI), put forth by the United Nations Development
Programme; the gender-related development index (including an indicator
on the representation of women in positions of power) discussed in the
Human Development Report 1995, and Convention 169 of the International
Labour Organization particularly as it concerns Indigenous and tribal
peoples' rights.=20


States must put an end to the process of homogenization of culture and
the commodification of women in media to suit the needs of the market.


States must make provisions to ensure women's equal participation in
political decision-making bodies.=20


States must take all possible steps to end patriarchal values and
sensitize the society towards democratization of the family structure.
1=20


<bold>P-2 The urgent implementation of measures such as:=20


</bold>P-2 a) the Tobin Tax; revenue from the tax would be paid into a
special fund:=20

=B7 earmarked for social development;=20

=B7 managed democratically by the international community as a whole;=20

=B7 according to criteria respecting fundamental human rights and
democracy;=20

=B7 with equal representation of women and men;=20

=B7 to which women (who represent 70% of the 1.3 billion people living in
extreme poverty) would have preferred access.=20


P-2 b) investment of 0.7% of the rich countries' gross national product
(GNP) in aid for developing countries;=20


P-2 c) adequate financing and democratization of United Nations
programs that are essential to defend women's and children's
fundamental rights, UNIFEM (UN Women's Programme), UNDP (United Nations
Development Programme) and UNICEF (UN children's fund);=20


P-2 d) an end to structural adjustment programs;=20


P-2 e) an end to cutbacks in social budgets and public services;=20


P-2 f) rejection of the proposed Multilateral Agreement on Investment
(MAI).=20


<bold>P-3 Cancellation of the debt of all Third World countries, taking
into account the principles of responsibility, transparency of
information and accountability.=20


</bold>We demand the immediate cancellation of the debt of the 53
poorest countries on the planet, in support of the objectives of the
Jubilee 2000 campaign.=20


In the longer term, we demand the cancellation of the debt of all Third
World countries and the setting up of a mechanism to monitor the debt
write-off, ensuring that this money is employed to eliminate poverty
and to further the well-being of people most affected by structural
adjustment programs, the majority of whom are women and girls.=20


<bold>P- 4 The implementation of the 20/20 formula between donor
countries and the recipients of international aid.=20


</bold>In this scheme, 20% of the sum contributed by the donor country
must be allocated to social development and 20% of the receiving
government's spending must be used for social programs.=20


<bold>P-5 A non-monolithic world political organization, with authority
over the economy and egalitarian and democratic representation of all
countries on earth (ensuring parity between poor countries and rich
countries) and equal representation of women and men.=20


</bold>This organization must have real decision-making power and
authority to act in order to implement a world economic system that is
fair, participatory and where solidarity plays a key role. The
following measures must be instituted immediately:=20


A World Council for Economic and Financial Security, which would be in
charge of redefining the rules for a new international financial system
based on the fair and equitable distribution of the planet's wealth.
Rooted in social justice, it would also focus on increasing the
well-being of the world population, particularly women, who make up
over half that population. Gender parity should be observed in the
composition of the Council's membership. Membership must also be
comprised of representatives of the civil society, for example NGOs,
unions, etc.) and must ensure parity of representation between
countries from the North and South.=20

=B7 Any ratification of trade conventions and agreements must be
subordinated to individual and collective fundamental human rights.
Trade must be subordinated to human rights, not the other way around.=20

=B7 The elimination of tax havens.=20

=B7 The end of banking secrecy.=20

=B7 The redistribution of wealth held by the seven richest countries.=20

=B7 A protocol to ensure application of the International Covenant on
Economic, Social and Cultural Rights.=20

 =20

<bold>P-6 That the embargoes and blockades-principally affecting women
and children-imposed by the major powers on many countries, be lifted.


</bold>We reaffirm our commitment to peace and to the protection of the
democratic and autonomous operation of nation-states.2

=20

</fontfamily><fontfamily><param>Arial_Black</param>Demands to eliminate
violence against women=20



</fontfamily><bold><fontfamily><param>Georgia</param>V-1</fontfamily></bold>=
<fontfamily><param>Georgia</param>
That governments claiming to be defenders of human rights condemn any
authority political, religious, economic or cultural that controls
women and girls, and denounce any regime that violates their
fundamental rights.=20


<bold>V-2</bold> That States recognize, in their statutes and actions,
that all forms of violence against women are violations of fundamental
human rights and cannot be justified by any custom, religion, cultural
practice or political power. Therefore, all states must recognize a
woman's right to determine her own destiny, and to exercise control
over her body and reproductive function.=20


<bold>V-3</bold> That States implement action plans, effective policies
and programs equipped with adequate financial and other means to end
all forms of violence against women.=20


These action plans must include the following elements in particular:
prevention; public education; prosecution; "treatment" for attackers;
research and statistics on all forms of violence against women;
assistance and protection for victims; campaigns against pornography,
procuring, and sexual assault, including child rape; non-sexist
education; easier access to the criminal justice system; and training
programs for judges and police.=20


<bold>V-4</bold> That the United Nations bring extraordinary pressure
to bear on member States to ratify without reservation and implement
the conventions and covenants relating to the rights of women and
children, in particular, the International Covenant on Civil and
Political Rights, the Convention on the Elimination of All Forms of
Discrimination Against Women, the Convention on the Rights of the
Child, the Convention on the Elimination of All Forms of Racial
Discrimination, the International Convention on the Protection of the
Rights of All Migrant Workers and their Families.=20


That States harmonize their national laws with these international
human rights instruments as well as with the Universal Declaration of
Human Rights, the Declaration on the Elimination of Violence Against
Women, the Cairo and Vienna Declarations, and the Beijing Declaration
and Platform for Action.=20


<bold>V-5</bold> That, as soon as possible, protocols be adopted (and
implementation mechanisms be established) for:=20

=B7 the Convention on the Elimination of all Forms of Discrimination
Against Women (CEDAW);=20

=B7 the Convention on the Rights of the Child.=20


These protocols will enable individuals and groups to bring complaints
against a State. These protocols are a means to exercise international
pressure on governments to implement the rights set out in these
covenants and conventions. Provisions must be made for effective
sanctions against non-compliant States.=20


<bold>V-6</bold> That mechanisms be established to implement the 1949
Convention for the Suppression of the Traffic in Persons and of the
Exploitation of the Prostitution of Others, taking into account recent
relevant documents such as the two resolutions of the United Nations
General Assembly (1996) concerning trafficking in women and girls and
violence against migrant women.=20


<bold>V-7</bold> That States recognize the jurisdiction of the
International Criminal Court and conform in particular to the
provisions, especially those that define rape and sexual abuse as war
crimes and crimes against humanity.=20


<bold>V-8</bold> That all States adopt and implement disarmament
policies with respect to conventional, nuclear and biological weapons.

=20

That all countries ratify the Convention Against Land Mines.=20


That the United Nations end all forms of intervention, aggression and
military occupation, assure the right of refugees to return to their
homeland, and bring pressure to bear on governments to enforce the
observance of human rights and to resolve conflicts.3=20


<bold>V-9</bold> That the right to asylum for women victims of sexist
discrimination and persecution and sexual violence be adopted as soon
possible.=20


<smaller>The next two demands were supported by the majority of women
present at the International Preparatory meeting on the condition of a
country-by-country adoption process. Some delegates were not in a
position to be able to commit to publicly defending these demands in
their respective countries. They remain an integral part of the World
March of Women in the Year 2000. Over the next few months, the names of
adopting countries will be added.=20


</smaller><bold>V- 10</bold> That, based on the principle of equality
of all persons, the United Nations and States of the international
community recognize formally that a person's sexual orientation shall
not bar them from the full exercise of the rights set out in the
following international instruments: the Universal Declaration of Human
Rights, the International Covenant on Civil and Political Rights, the
International Covenant on Economic, Social and Cultural Rights and the
Convention on the Elimination of All Forms of Discrimination Against
Women.=20


<bold>V-11</bold> That the right to asylum for victims of
discrimination and persecution based on sexual orientation be adopted
as soon as possible.=20



<smaller>NOTES=20

<bold>1 	</bold>At the International Preparatory meeting, the delegates
adopted the three above-mentioned demands without integrating them into
the two themes. The Special Newsletter listed them as "A", "B" and "C"
; this Guide incorporates them into the whole.=20

<bold>2 	</bold>This demand was integrated to the whole after the
Special International Preparatory meeting. It was labelled "D" in the
Special Newsletter.=20

<bold>3 	</bold>These demands were integrated into the whole after the
International Preparatory meeting. They were labelled "E", "F" and "G"
in the Special Newsletter.=20

=20

</smaller></fontfamily>*****************************************************=
**

HOMELESS PEOPLE'S NETWORK <<http://aspin.asu.edu/hpn>

6,000+ POSTS by or via homeless & ex-homeless people

Nothing About Us Without Us - Democratize Public Policy

*******************************************************

chance martin

Coalition on Homelessness, San Francisco

468 Turk St.

San Francisco, CA 94102

vox: (415) 346.3740

=46ax: (415) 775.5639

coh@sfo.com

http://www.sfo.com/~coh

--============_-1271568063==_ma============--