Re: Seattle: SHARE fights Homeless ID "Tracking Collar" FWD

Bill Tinker (wtinker@fcgnetworks.net)
Fri, 16 Oct 1998 15:05:17 -0400


Also a parting shot,that $90,000.00 Could house at least 15 homeless
people,perhaps more..What a waste of tax dollars!!!
                                   Bill
----- Original Message -----
From: Bill Tinker <wtinker@fcgnetworks.net>
To: Tom Boland <wgcp@earthlink.net>
Cc: group <hpn@aspin.asu.edu>; Coalition on Homelessness, SF <coh@sfo.com>;
H. C. Covington -- I CAN America <icanamerica@email.msn.com>
Sent: Friday, October 16, 1998 2:55 PM
Subject: Re: Seattle: SHARE fights Homeless ID "Tracking Collar" FWD


> This smacks of job security,for the so called social workers,and I can
tell
> you horror stories about "Voc Rehab" how a lady took all the information
on
> my disabled fiancee,and six months later we called to find out what was
> brewing.Well the woman retired and took her files home with her,sooooo
> naturally we cancelled.
>  No this electronic tracking device is similar to house arrest type of
stuff
> and no should be considered paranoid for this is most definitely a huge
> waste of money,and a means to keep track of where you go and have
been,next
> they will set up centers for any one over 50 to go to to check into and be
> determined if they are worthy to exist.. Get these persons a
home,food,some
> dignity back and stop creating paying jobs for the fat cats whom have no
> inkling of what the homeless person does in a day to survive or live,nor
how
> many miles they have walked.
>  This idea is almost as insane as cards ,when will this vast waste of
funds
> stop and the real homeless programs begin???
>    I can see it now,no bed unless you have your card,or nothing to eat
> unless you are wearing a monitor....Stop the crap,stop putting up road
> blocks and actually become involved with a realistic program.
>  Again some of these do gooders should have at least six months of
> homelessness under their belt to be able to work in any program for the
> homeless,or disabled.                   Bill
>
> ----- Original Message -----
> From: Tom Boland <wgcp@earthlink.net>
> To: HOMELESS PEOPLE'S NETWORK list <HPN@aspin.asu.edu>
> Sent: Saturday, October 16, 1999 9:13 AM
> Subject: Seattle: SHARE fights Homeless ID "Tracking Collar" FWD
>
>
> > http://www.seattle-pi.com/local/home132.shtml
> > FWD  Seattle Post-Intelligencer / Wednesday, October 13, 1999
> >
> > HOMELESS FIGHT PLAN TO TRACK THEIR MOVEMENTS BY COMPUTER
> >
> > By ROBERT L. JAMIESON JR.
> > SEATTLE POST-INTELLIGENCER REPORTER
> >
> > Spurred by fears that a proposed city computer system to track them
> > will step on personal freedoms, a group of street people will meet
> > with city officials today to send a terse message: No way.
> >
> > Members of the homeless issues group Seattle Housing and Resource
> > Effort say the tracking plan also deflects attention from a
> > shortage of emergency shelter beds in the city.
> >
> > Group members say they will withhold from case workers personal
> > information that could be compiled and used against the homeless.
> >
> > "It's not paranoia. It's just wrong," said John Steetle, a
> > homeless man who is part of SHARE. "We have no assurances on
> > how the information will be used. People are frightened....
> > Maybe I have a warrant out. Will I be cast as a bad homeless
> > person?"
> >
> > But the concern is not universal among social service providers.
> >
> > Bill Wippel of the Union Gospel Mission in Seattle said tracking
> > would allow his agency to better handle its caseloads. He said
> > case workers could study personal histories, share information
> > with other shelters and social programs and learn which people
> > are serious about getting off the streets.
> >
> > "It's like being a doctor," Wippel said. "You can't treat the
> > patient without having proper information. The doctor always has
> > his file. We are interested in better management, not snooping."
> >
> > The controversial tracking system is part of the city's Safe Harbors
> > program, a multipronged plan unanimously approved by City Council
> > last week to address the housing and service needs of about 5,500
> > homeless in Seattle.
> >
> > The council has authorized $90,000 to hire a consultant to design
> > the program. Under the plan, a homeless person would be given a
> > unique number. Any time he or she went to a soup kitchen or slept
> > at a shelter, the number would be registered in a computer network.
> >
> > A case manager could review a homeless person's file and determine
> > whether there is a pattern or potential solution for a case -- drug
> > rehabilitation or job referrals, for examples.
> >
> > City Councilman Peter Steinbrueck said the city and surrounding area
> > have about 2,350 emergency shelter beds, in addition to transitional
> > housing rooms. But an exact number of homeless people and shelter
> > beds, he said, is hard to pin down.
> >
> > "We don't have a system to accurately measure the number of homeless
> > people and the needs they represent -- substance abuse, mental
> > illness, out of jobs," Steinbrueck said. "The entire system is
> > either fragmented or uncoordinated."
> >
> > In Seattle, city leaders currently spend $9.1 million on the
> > homeless, including $5 million for emergency shelter. But officials
> > felt the homeless services network needed to be more efficient.
> >
> > So they convened with a wide range of people, from homeless
> > advocates to people on the streets to social service providers,
> > and discussed the best approach. They learned other cities --
> > including Philadelphia, New York and Boston -- were using computer
> > tracking system for years. Encouraged by success in those places,
> > Seattle officials imported the concept.
> >
> > Dennis Culhane, an associate professor at the University of
> > Pennsylvania, who developed computer software to track the
> > homeless, said the concept "is an idea whose time has come."
> >
> > "There are tremendous benefits," Culhane said. "It is not possible
> > to develop an efficient system of services and deliver them without
> > having good data."
> >
> > In Philadelphia, civic leaders learned a surprising fact from the
> > computer tracking: The number of unduplicated homeless people using
> > the city's services was several times greater than the most liberal
> > estimates, Culhane said.
> >
> > In addition, he said, shelters in Philadelphia learned specific
> > information about who was using the shelters -- a chronic homeless
> > population that tended to be disabled, mentally ill, and older.
> >
> > Such detailed facts, allowed the city to better fashion solutions
> > for homeless people -- and save money.
> >
> > But in Seattle, some homeless people have called Safe Harbor
> > "unsafe" and "no harbor," lambasting what they perceive as an
> > invasion of privacy.
> >
> > Culhane, however, said laws require confidentiality of personal
> > information used by social agencies. In addition, computer programs
> > can be tailored to ensure that certain data is shared or analyzed
> > between certain social service agencies.
> >
> > END FORWARD
> >
> > **In accordance with Title 17 U.S.C. section 107, this material
> > is distributed without charge or profit to those who have
> > expressed a prior interest in receiving this type of information
> > for non-profit research and educational purposes only.**
> >
> >
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