Re: Separate homeless kids & women from homeless adult males? FWD

Flower Child (nternet@c2i2.com)
Sun, 29 Nov 1998 13:21:07 -0700


I'm getting pretty tired and fed up with this world's problems
like this homelessness and its subcategories.  The world can be
fixed when people get as mad as I am.  But they're still more
greedy and selfish than mad, and if they're not as angry it's
because they haven't risen with knowledge and experience to see
the scope of the problem.  Or poor or rich, they're still tied up
with images of material goods as desirable over real human
conditions and relationships.  Those people with the loot and
castle-like houses are just no good.  Anyone who cares at this
point will liquidate it all and start living with or near the
homeless and start pumping in the funding to get it done!  When
they stay there, you know about them, and I don't see any leaving
their fairy-tale worlds.  If the world's people get angry and fed
up enough to go on as complete a general strike as possible
things will get moving and all the castles will come crashing
down (or open to the public as they deteriorate) because they
constantly need the "lower" classes to keep servicing them.  The
rich and "elevated" ones can do practically NOTHING on their own!
They are always so far able to find "lower" goons who will sell
out for a farthing (or a crumb of the pie, or a few bucks) and
will defend the rich, shoot the poor, build more security guns
and fences, corrupt the legislators to protect their empires,
repair their Mercedes and Cads and planes, cook their vittles,
watch and train their kids, you name it.

Families should never be separated, lovers should never be
separated, and there's a kid in all of us no matter how old we
are, who needs to be protected because inside us all, real deep,
we are just as tender as the tenderest young'n.

Like I've said before, we need HOUSES, even if they're small
ones, like microhouses.  All over, and also communities of them
and also facilitated communities for vehicle-based living and
also legal permission to live anywhere almost with our vehicles.
We need legal rights to build any hut we might be able to on any
land not being directly used, until organized people can build or
provide something better.  the right to live is the basic right!
Forget how "nice" houses and communities are supposed to look,
just like the new stuff at the stores.  That's baloney,
merchandising and enslaving baloney!  Our relationships and
equality are the most important elements which make up the real,
human world.  Those rich have no right to be more than equal to
any other person on the planet, why do you forget that, and go
along with their idiotic dreams of super-humanhood?  If you can't
shake it, you'll continue to get more or less what you deserve
for believing in the whole system of discrimination and
oppression.  I'm sorry that you're so weak that you're a danger
to me because you're giving the elevated ones and their machinery
so much power to threaten me.
And those children are not getting a warped view of the
world--they're just getting too much of the truth too soon.

The oppressed, hurt and poor do need to learn to do the best with
what they have and where they are.  I can clean any alley or
deserted building out, or at least a part of it, when I have to
live or sleep there, and I'm surely not going to be busting
bottles or throwing junk around even in the worst part of town
because I know we create the world we live in and that's why it
is the way it is now.

Flower Child                from alt.gathering.rainbow
fed up but still loving you

-----Original Message-----
From: Tom Boland <wgcp@earthlink.net>
To: HPN@aspin.asu.edu <HPN@aspin.asu.edu>; fnb-l@tao.ca
<fnb-l@tao.ca>; streetkid-l@jbu.edu <streetkid-l@jbu.edu>
Date: Sunday, November 29, 1998 12:51 AM
Subject: Separate homeless kids & women from homeless adult
males? FWD


:Separating homeless women & children from homeless adult males
is common
:among US service providers.
:
:Do you agree with this practice?  Why or why not?
:
:
:See related article below, via Street-Kid list
:http://www.jbu.edu/business/sk.html
:Listowner: jwalenci@acc.jbu.edu:
:
:http://www.star-telegram.com:80/news/doc/1047/1:METRO42/1:METRO4
2112598.html
:FWD  Updated: Wednesday, Nov. 25, 1998 at 22:37 CST
:
:SHELTER TO BUILD FAMILY FACILITY
:
:By Yvette Craig
:Star-Telegram Staff Writer
:
:FORT WORTH, TX -- The Rev. Dana Jones stood across the street
from the
:Presbyterian Night Shelter one Saturday morning and was appalled
at
:the sight of homeless children playing in the street amid broken
beer
:bottles, trash and broken people.
:
:Jones was angry and troubled, and he related what he saw in a
Sunday
:morning sermon, charging worshipers to do something about it.
:
:"This is urgent," Jones told his congregation at First
Presbyterian
:Church. "I hate those children being in that shelter, on that
block,
:in that danger for another night. It is wrong and it is our
business
:to fix it."
:
:Last week, the night shelter's board of directors, of which
Jones is a
:member, voted to construct a separate 20-room shelter for
families
:with children on a grassy lot behind the shelter.
:
:The new shelter would alleviate overcrowding in the main shelter
and
:provide a safe environment for children uprooted from homes and
left
:to sleep next to strangers.
:
:The board wants to raise $500,000 to jump-start the project. And
the
:giving has already begun. Jones' passionate sermon moved his
church's
:mission commission to donate $100,000 to start the project, said
John
:Suggs, executive director of the night shelter.
:
:"It's not about their mothers or their fathers," Jones said. "It
is
:about a little girl or little boy that needs a safe place to
eat,
:play, go to the bathroom, laugh, cry and lie down at night."
:
:The night shelter was not designed to serve families and
children when
:it opened in October 1987. It was designed primarily for street
people
:who were suffering from mental illness, substance abuse or both,
Suggs
:said.
:
:"What has happened is that the old skid row alcoholics have been
:joined, not replaced, by these new arrivals," Suggs said.
"Families
:with children do not belong in open bay emergency shelters."
:
:In 1991, the night shelter averaged serving about three children
a
:night. By 1997, that numbered had swelled to about 32 children a
:night.
:
:Now the shelter is home to roughly 45 youngsters ranging from
newborns
:to age 13, Suggs said.
:
:The night shelter, on Cypress Street two blocks south of East
:Lancaster Avenue near downtown, is referred to by locals as "the
:walk-in." No identification is required to stay there.
:
:The shelter has "Presbyterian" in its name because the three
churches
:that helped found it are St. Stephen's Presbyterian, Ridglea
:Presbyterian and First Presbyterian.
:
:Men sleep in a separate area from the women and children, but
all
:share a cafeteria for evening meals.
:
:A few months ago, a mentally ill man exposed himself to children
at
:the shelter. A childless women who is schizophrenic kicked a
child she
:thought was too loud, Suggs said.
:
:There was a recent outbreak of tuberculosis. The children had to
be
:tested, but none was positive. Last weekend, a child who was
swinging
:on piping beneath a stairwell fell and broke his arm and
disconnected
:the pipe, Suggs said.
:
:"This is why we can't leave these kids in here," he said.
:
:In 1997, an estimated 600 children lived on the streets in
Tarrant
:County, according to the Tarrant County Homeless Survey
conducted that
:year.
:
:National studies show that homeless children have more colds,
head
:lice respiratory disorders, and eating and sleeping problems.
And they
:often suffer serious emotional and developmental problems that
can
:persist long after their families find permanent housing.
:
:"The Presbyterian Night Shelter traditionally deals with the
people
:really down and out," said the Rev. John Tietjen, paster of
Trinity
:Lutheran Church and chairman of the women's and children's
facility
:committee.
:
:"These are the people no one else in society cares about, but
the
:night shelter does. But the children don't deserve this. They
deserve
:privacy and a room of their own and a place to play."
:
:Suggs said a child can take up five times more space at the
shelter
:than a single man because of the youngster's special needs. On a
:recent morning, cribs, stuffed animals, diaper bags, play pens,
:bottles and coloring books were scattered among the rows of
:mattresses.
:
:"The need is clear," Suggs said. "There is no greater need than
:helping homeless children have a place of their own.
:
:"There is no reason for homeless children to live in an open
area with
:the mentally ill, drug addicts, and chronic alcoholics. It
leaves the
:children with a warped perception of what the world is like."
:
:END FORWARD
:-
:** NOTICE: In accordance with Title 17 U.S.C. Section 107, this
material is
:distributed without profit to those who have expressed a prior
interest in
:receiving the included information for research and educational
purposes. **
:
:HOMELESS PEOPLE'S NETWORK  <http://aspin.asu.edu/hpn/>  Home
Page
:ARCHIVES  <http://aspin.asu.edu/hpn/archives.html>  read posts
to HPN
:TO JOIN  <http://aspin.asu.edu/hpn/join.html> or email Tom
<wgcp@earthlink.net>
: