USA: A closer look at the homeless, parts 1 & 2 FWD

Tom Boland (wgcp@earthlink.net)
Sat, 28 Nov 1998 02:14:46 -0400


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[USA] A closer look at the homeless [parts 1 & 2]

http://www.msnbc.com/local/WHAG/54318.asp
FWD  MSNBC  File Found: 25/11/98

A CLOSER LOOK AT HOMELESSNESS, PART 1

Tami Birckner

GAMBRILL STATE PARK, MD- In the early 1980's, homelessness was an issue the
federal government looked at as simply a local problem. Today, homelessness
is defined as a national problem, with the number of homeless people in
communities across the country growing year after year. It's something that
can happen to almost anyone.

      The Taylors never imagined they would be without a place to call
home. But when the house they rented was sold earlier this summer, the road
to homelessness began. A large family and bad credit didn't help.

     Service Taylor, Sr. who has been homeless since July explained, "We
had gotten in touch with a realtor. But again, when they did credit checks,
because of my adverse credit, I wasn't able to get established."

      Try as they might, their luck began to run out. Houses they can
afford aren't big enough for a family of seven. But their family ties are
holding them together. "Sooner or later we will find something. But I don't
want to be dictated to that I have to break my family up because of the
size of it. I don't think that's fair to any of us," declared Taylor, Sr.

     The Taylors story isn't unique. Carrol Springer of the Washington
County Department of Social Services stated, "The growing number of
homeless in our country are families."

     On any given night, more than seven hundred thousand Americans will be
without shelter, and up to two million Americans will be homeless sometime
during the year. The Taylors are now part of the statistics, yet they are
determined to stay together as a family, whatever it takes. Service Taylor,
Jr. declared, "We started as a family and we're going to stay as a family.
That's the way it's going to be."

      "If we die of exposure, we're dying as a family," stated Taylor, Sr.

     That's their choice. Gail Taylor explained,  "There's no way I could
sleep at night, knowing they're up here freezing on the mountain, and I'm
in a warm bed."

     It's tough for Heather and Rachel too, who both had different ideas of
what life would be like for them at age nineteen. Heather explained, "At
nineteen, I thought we'd probably have a house with a yard. And the family
would be together, especially with the holidays coming up."

     Even so, they're making due. They are working, and continue to look
for a place to live. Admittedly, it's not easy. "I am a little bitter,
yes," declared Taylor, Sr.

      Heather Taylor had this to say. "I feel as  if we've been let down."

     For now, the Taylors are doing their best to keep warm, and said
despite not having the comforts of a real home, their spirits are high.
But, they're not looking forward to the winter months that lie ahead. In
our second segment on homeless, we bring you a success story, to prove that
being homeless can be a temporary way of life.

***

http://www.msnbc.com/local/WHAG/54418.asp

A CLOSER LOOK AT HOMELESSNESS, PART 2

FREDERICK, MD- About thirty-three percent of the homeless in America are
substance abusers of alcohol, drugs, or both. But addiction isn't the end
of the road. Many of the homeless take steps to turn their lives around,
and many are successful.

     For years, Michael Thompson was a man of the streets. He was addicted
to drugs & homeless. He explained, "I had been in and out of the prison
system for fifteen years."

     When not behind bars, Michael was without a home, on Baltimore street
corners, selling crack and other drugs to anyone who would buy. "I was
lost. I was being blown about like dust in the wind, never knowing where I
was going, never knowing where I would be one day to the next, and never
having a plan or a purpose for my life," declared Michael.

     Three years ago, Michael decided to find a purpose. He turned to the
Frederick Rescue Mission. Kathy Dell of the Frederick Rescue Mission
explained, "He wanted change. He'd been there long enough and he wanted to
change his life."

     Michael continues, "If I had not come here, I would still be lost. I'd
be living on the street somewhere, lost in addiction, suffering somewhere
and basically killing myself."

     Today Michael is married and no longer a part of the statistics.
Instead, he has proven that life changes can be made. "He's come from the
streets of Baltimore to being the head of one of our departments," stated
Kathy Dell.

     Michael runs the missions thrift stores. But that's not all. He also
plays an integral part in helping the men who turn to the mission make a
new life for themselves. Michael said, "For most men, the reason they come
through this door, the main reason is lack of love. We try to show them
that they're loved, that they're needed, and that they can be part of a
family here."

     Michael's own experiences help make it possible for others to accept
their pasts, and move forward, to a future. "I have been where they have
been at and I can show them a way out. There's not a man that comes through
this house that had a worse addiction or a worse problem than I had."

END FORWARD
-






** NOTICE: In accordance with Title 17 U.S.C. Section 107, this material is
distributed without profit to those who have expressed a prior interest in
receiving the included information for research and educational purposes. **

HOMELESS PEOPLE'S NETWORK  <http://aspin.asu.edu/hpn/>  Home Page
ARCHIVES  <http://aspin.asu.edu/hpn/archives.html>  read posts to HPN
TO JOIN  <http://aspin.asu.edu/hpn/join.html> or email Tom <wgcp@earthlink.net>
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*******************************************************

3,000+ posts by or via homeless & ex-homeless people

HOMELESS PEOPLE'S NETWORK <<http://aspin.asu.edu/hpn/>

*******************************************************


[USA] A closer look at the homeless [parts 1 & 2]


http://www.msnbc.com/local/WHAG/54318.asp

FWD  MSNBC  File Found: 25/11/98


<paraindent><param>right,left</param>A CLOSER LOOK AT HOMELESSNESS,
PART 1


Tami Birckner

</paraindent>

GAMBRILL STATE PARK, MD- In the early 1980's, homelessness was an issue
the federal government looked at as simply a local problem. Today,
homelessness is defined as a national problem, with the number of
homeless people in communities across the country growing year after
year. It's something that can happen to almost anyone.


      The Taylors never imagined they would be without a place to call
home. But when the house they rented was sold earlier this summer, the
road to homelessness began. A large family and bad credit didn't help.



     Service Taylor, Sr. who has been homeless since July explained,
"We had gotten in touch with a realtor. But again, when they did credit
checks, because of my adverse credit, I wasn't able to get
established."


      Try as they might, their luck began to run out. Houses they can
afford aren't big enough for a family of seven. But their family ties
are holding them together. "Sooner or later we will find something. But
I don't want to be dictated to that I have to break my family up
because of the size of it. I don't think that's fair to any of us,"
declared Taylor, Sr.


     The Taylors story isn't unique. Carrol Springer of the Washington
County Department of Social Services stated, "The growing number of
homeless in our country are families."


     On any given night, more than seven hundred thousand Americans
will be without shelter, and up to two million Americans will be
homeless sometime during the year. The Taylors are now part of the
statistics, yet they are determined to stay together as a family,
whatever it takes. Service Taylor, Jr. declared, "We started as a
family and we're going to stay as a family. That's the way it's going
to be."


      "If we die of exposure, we're dying as a family," stated Taylor,
Sr.


     That's their choice. Gail Taylor explained,  "There's no way I
could sleep at night, knowing they're up here freezing on the mountain,
and I'm in a warm bed."


     It's tough for Heather and Rachel too, who both had different
ideas of what life would be like for them at age nineteen. Heather
explained, "At nineteen, I thought we'd probably have a house with a
yard. And the family would be together, especially with the holidays
coming up."


     Even so, they're making due. They are working, and continue to
look for a place to live. Admittedly, it's not easy. "I am a little
bitter, yes," declared Taylor, Sr.


      Heather Taylor had this to say. "I feel as  if we've been let
down."


     For now, the Taylors are doing their best to keep warm, and said
despite not having the comforts of a real home, their spirits are high.
But, they're not looking forward to the winter months that lie ahead.
In our second segment on homeless, we bring you a success story, to
prove that being homeless can be a temporary way of life.


***


http://www.msnbc.com/local/WHAG/54418.asp


<paraindent><param>right,left</param>A CLOSER LOOK AT HOMELESSNESS,
PART 2

</paraindent>

FREDERICK, MD- About thirty-three percent of the homeless in America
are substance abusers of alcohol, drugs, or both. But addiction isn't
the end of the road. Many of the homeless take steps to turn their
lives around, and many are successful.


     For years, Michael Thompson was a man of the streets. He was
addicted to drugs & homeless. He explained, "I had been in and out of
the prison system for fifteen years."


     When not behind bars, Michael was without a home, on Baltimore
street corners, selling crack and other drugs to anyone who would buy.
"I was lost. I was being blown about like dust in the wind, never
knowing where I was going, never knowing where I would be one day to
the next, and never having a plan or a purpose for my life," declared
Michael.


     Three years ago, Michael decided to find a purpose. He turned to
the Frederick Rescue Mission. Kathy Dell of the Frederick Rescue
Mission explained, "He wanted change. He'd been there long enough and
he wanted to change his life."


     Michael continues, "If I had not come here, I would still be lost.
I'd be living on the street somewhere, lost in addiction, suffering
somewhere and basically killing myself."


     Today Michael is married and no longer a part of the statistics.
Instead, he has proven that life changes can be made. "He's come from
the streets of Baltimore to being the head of one of our departments,"
stated Kathy Dell.


     Michael runs the missions thrift stores. But that's not all. He
also plays an integral part in helping the men who turn to the mission
make a new life for themselves. Michael said, "For most men, the reason
they come through this door, the main reason is lack of love. We try to
show them that they're loved, that they're needed, and that they can be
part of a family here."


     Michael's own experiences help make it possible for others to
accept their pasts, and move forward, to a future. "I have been where
they have been at and I can show them a way out. There's not a man that
comes through this house that had a worse addiction or a worse problem
than I had."


END FORWARD

-





** NOTICE: In accordance with Title 17 U.S.C. Section 107, this material is distributed without profit to those who have expressed a prior interest in receiving the included information for research and educational purposes. **


HOMELESS PEOPLE'S NETWORK  <<http://aspin.asu.edu/hpn/>  Home Page

ARCHIVES  <<http://aspin.asu.edu/hpn/archives.html>  read posts to HPN

TO JOIN  <<http://aspin.asu.edu/hpn/join.html> or email Tom <<wgcp@earthlink.net>

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