ALERT: Berkeley votes on SLEEPING BAN bill Dec 8/homeless sweeps

Tom Boland (wgcp@earthlink.net)
Sat, 28 Nov 1998 00:28:25 -0400


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http://dailynews.yahoo.com/headlines/ap/ap_us/story.html?s=3Dv/ap/19981125/u=
s/berk
eley_homeless_1.html
=46WD  Daily News - Wednesday November 25, 1998


BERKELEY CRACKS DOWN ON HOMELESS


BERKELEY, Calif. (AP) - Fed up with young homeless people who harass
shoppers, the city council of this famously liberal city took a first step
toward banning sleeping and keeping packs of dogs along two downtown
avenues.

Council members gave preliminary approval Tuesday to the prohibitions along
busy Telegraph and Shattuck avenues.

The no-sleeping measure, which expires 16 months after it takes effect,
covers 7 a.m. to 10 p.m. and includes $15,000 for new drug detox beds.

The canine ordinance limits people to only two ``stationary dogs'' every 10
feet. It's designed to counter the practice of some homeless pet owners who
tether their dogs together, sometimes menacing passers-by.

Tolerance for the homeless has reached its limits even here in what many
jokingly call the People's Republic of Berkeley, where the city's vast
liberal faction, centered on the University of California campus, has long
argued against restricting civil liberties.

In a case of strange political bedfellows, progressive Linda Maio joined
with moderate Polly Armstrong to sponsor the measures.

``It seems to me to not be a draconian measure to prohibit lying down in
downtown commercial areas,'' Maio said. ``There are parks where people can
lie down and rest.''

Lisa Stevens, chairwoman of the city's park commission, said the laws sound
like harassment. ``Things are no different on Telegraph than they've been
for 20 years,'' she said. ``We had the counterculture. Now we've got a new
group.''

If approved Dec. 8, the measures will take effect a month later. A third
proposed ordinance, outlawing skateboarding in shopping areas, failed
Tuesday.

END FORWARD
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*******************************************************


http://dailynews.yahoo.com/headlines/ap/ap_us/story.html?s=3Dv/ap/19981125/u=
s/berkeley_homeless_1.html

=46WD  Daily News - Wednesday November 25, 1998



<paraindent><param>right,left</param>BERKELEY CRACKS DOWN ON HOMELESS

</paraindent>


BERKELEY, Calif. (AP) - Fed up with young homeless people who harass
shoppers, the city council of this famously liberal city took a first
step toward banning sleeping and keeping packs of dogs along two
downtown avenues.


Council members gave preliminary approval Tuesday to the prohibitions
along busy Telegraph and Shattuck avenues.


The no-sleeping measure, which expires 16 months after it takes effect,
covers 7 a.m. to 10 p.m. and includes $15,000 for new drug detox beds.


The canine ordinance limits people to only two ``stationary dogs''
every 10 feet. It's designed to counter the practice of some homeless
pet owners who tether their dogs together, sometimes menacing
passers-by.


Tolerance for the homeless has reached its limits even here in what
many jokingly call the People's Republic of Berkeley, where the city's
vast liberal faction, centered on the University of California campus,
has long argued against restricting civil liberties.


In a case of strange political bedfellows, progressive Linda Maio
joined with moderate Polly Armstrong to sponsor the measures.


``It seems to me to not be a draconian measure to prohibit lying down
in downtown commercial areas,'' Maio said. ``There are parks where
people can lie down and rest.''


Lisa Stevens, chairwoman of the city's park commission, said the laws
sound like harassment. ``Things are no different on Telegraph than
they've been for 20 years,'' she said. ``We had the counterculture. Now
we've got a new group.''


If approved Dec. 8, the measures will take effect a month later. A
third proposed ordinance, outlawing skateboarding in shopping areas,
failed Tuesday.


END FORWARD

-=20

** NOTICE: In accordance with Title 17 U.S.C. Section 107, this material is=
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 receiving the included information for research and educational purposes. *=
*


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