AZ Homeless use art to express feelings/Save the Family FWD

Tom Boland (wgcp@earthlink.net)
Wed, 25 Nov 1998 03:32:33 -0400


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http://www.azcentral.com:80/sev/news/1104art.shtml
FWD  Arizona Republic - Nov. 4, 1998


HOMELESS USE ART TO EXPRESS FEELINGS

By Monica Davis - Special for The Republic


A homeless boy shared his troubles by making a mask and painting it purple,
red and blue.

A 60-year-old homeless woman came to terms with the root of her pain and
anger -- an unhappy childhood and a difficult marriage -- while creating a
collage.

The masks, drawings and collages are one way Save the Family encourages
homeless families to express their feelings and sort through problems.

The artwork, long admired by Save the Family staff, is headed for a much
more public display.

On Friday, they will unveil the art at a fund-raising event. It then will
be displayed in schools, libraries and other public locations.

Betsy Webb, Save the Family's director of counseling referral and education
services, said children and adults seem better able to open up while
coloring, drawing or making a collage. She said most of them pour their
heart and energy into an art project.

Even those who don't invest time or effort in their work learn plenty about
themselves, Webb said.

One woman who had plenty of creative ideas for her project never got much
down on paper. When the deadline passed, she was the only one in the group
with an unfinished art project. The woman, disappointed in herself,
admitted she had a history of not finishing projects - at work and at home.

"She at least now knows she can't fool herself any more," Webb said.

The unveiling of the artwork on Friday coincides with a major Save the
Family fund-raising event. About 200 items will be on the auction block,
including vacation trips, golf packages, theater tickets, dinners, doodles
by actor John Travolta and other celebrities.

There also will be autographed photographs of Charlton Heston, Tim Allen
and Rodney Dangerfield and basketballs autographed by Phoenix Suns Coach
Danny Ainge and Phoenix Mercury stars.

Save the Family spokeswoman Kaci Manning said the art tour is a way to show
the community another side of the homeless - their creativity, their hopes
and their raw emotions.

By sharing the art with the public, Manning said, "maybe we can understand
it (homelessness) better."

Anyone interested in hosting the traveling art show should contact Save the
Family. The agency is based in Mesa and provides transitional housing for
homeless families with children. The housing sites are in Mesa, Chandler,
Tempe and Scottsdale.

Save the Family formed in November 1989 with four families. Last year, the
agency assisted 99 families. Families can receive assistance for a maximum
of two years.

Executive Director Janice Parker said most clients are single women with
children. Many fled to the agency to escape an abusive relationship. Many
lack adequate education and job skills, she said.

Save the Family works with the entire family - parents and children because
the little ones have baggage, too, Parker said.

Save the Family strives to turn their lives around and teach the families
to be self-sufficient.

Toward that goal, Save the Family helps the homeless acquire job skills and
education, as well as teaches them to manage everything from finances to
anger. They even help seek out child care.

"This program is really a salvation for many of these women," she said.

END FORWARD
** NOTICE: In accordance with Title 17 U.S.C. Section 107, this material is
distributed without profit to those who have expressed a prior interest in
receiving the included information for research and educational purposes. **

HOMELESS PEOPLE'S NETWORK  <http://aspin.asu.edu/hpn/>  Home Page
ARCHIVES  <http://aspin.asu.edu/hpn/archives.html>  read posts to HPN
TO JOIN  <http://aspin.asu.edu/hpn/join.html> or email Tom <wgcp@earthlink.net>
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http://www.azcentral.com:80/sev/news/1104art.shtml

FWD  Arizona Republic - Nov. 4, 1998                



<paraindent><param>right,left</param>HOMELESS USE ART TO EXPRESS
FEELINGS                


By Monica Davis - Special for The Republic

</paraindent>


A homeless boy shared his troubles by making a mask and painting it
purple, red and blue. 


A 60-year-old homeless woman came to terms with the root of her pain
and

anger -- an unhappy childhood and a difficult marriage -- while
creating a collage. 


The masks, drawings and collages are one way Save the Family encourages
homeless families to express their feelings and sort through problems.



The artwork, long admired by Save the Family staff, is headed for a
much more public display. 


On Friday, they will unveil the art at a fund-raising event. It then
will be displayed in schools, libraries and other public locations. 


Betsy Webb, Save the Family's director of counseling referral and
education services, said children and adults seem better able to open
up while coloring, drawing or making a collage. She said most of them
pour their heart and energy into an art project. 


Even those who don't invest time or effort in their work learn plenty
about themselves, Webb said. 


One woman who had plenty of creative ideas for her project never got
much down on paper. When the deadline passed, she was the only one in
the group with an unfinished art project. The woman, disappointed in
herself, admitted she had a history of not finishing projects - at work
and at home. 


"She at least now knows she can't fool herself any more," Webb said. 


The unveiling of the artwork on Friday coincides with a major Save the
Family fund-raising event. About 200 items will be on the auction
block, including vacation trips, golf packages, theater tickets,
dinners, doodles by actor John Travolta and other celebrities. 


There also will be autographed photographs of Charlton Heston, Tim
Allen and Rodney Dangerfield and basketballs autographed by Phoenix
Suns Coach Danny Ainge and Phoenix Mercury stars. 


Save the Family spokeswoman Kaci Manning said the art tour is a way to
show the community another side of the homeless - their creativity,
their hopes and their raw emotions. 


By sharing the art with the public, Manning said, "maybe we can
understand it (homelessness) better." 


Anyone interested in hosting the traveling art show should contact Save
the Family. The agency is based in Mesa and provides transitional
housing for homeless families with children. The housing sites are in
Mesa, Chandler, Tempe and Scottsdale. 


Save the Family formed in November 1989 with four families. Last year,
the agency assisted 99 families. Families can receive assistance for a
maximum of two years. 


Executive Director Janice Parker said most clients are single women
with children. Many fled to the agency to escape an abusive
relationship. Many lack adequate education and job skills, she said. 


Save the Family works with the entire family - parents and children
because the little ones have baggage, too, Parker said. 


Save the Family strives to turn their lives around and teach the
families to be self-sufficient. 


Toward that goal, Save the Family helps the homeless acquire job skills
and education, as well as teaches them to manage everything from
finances to anger. They even help seek out child care. 


"This program is really a salvation for many of these women," she
said.


END FORWARD

** NOTICE: In accordance with Title 17 U.S.C. Section 107, this material is distributed without profit to those who have expressed a prior interest in receiving the included information for research and educational purposes. **


HOMELESS PEOPLE'S NETWORK  <<http://aspin.asu.edu/hpn/>  Home Page

ARCHIVES  <<http://aspin.asu.edu/hpn/archives.html>  read posts to HPN

TO JOIN  <<http://aspin.asu.edu/hpn/join.html> or email Tom <<wgcp@earthlink.net>

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