Toronto mayor finds NYC tough on homeless, likes squeegee kid

Tom Boland (wgcp@earthlink.net)
Thu, 19 Nov 1998 22:01:55 -0400


--============_-1300595172==_ma============
Content-Type: text/plain; charset="us-ascii"

http://www2.thestar.com/thestar/editorial/toronto/981119NEW03b_CI-MEL19.html
FWD  Toronto Star - November 19, 1998
          [editorial] Greater Toronto Story:


LASTMAN FINDS NEW YORK TOUGH ON HOMELESS
BUT HE LIKES DRACKDOWN ON SQUEEGEE KIDS

By  Jack Lakey - Toronto Star - City Hall Bureau


 NEW YORK - Toronto Mayor Mel Lastman has ruled out this city's method for
keeping homeless people from freezing to death on the street - using force
to move them to temporary shelters.

 Lastman began a three-day trade mission here yesterday by meeting with New
York Mayor Rudolph Giuliani, who explained how this city has dealt with
homelessness, squeegeeing and motorists who run red lights.

 Lastman likes what they have done here to get rid of squeegee people:
banning them. And he loves the success New York has had in catching
red-light runners: the city's 30 roving cameras gather evidence from
various intersections, and fines are levied.

 However, Lastman says that forcibly removing the homeless from the streets
to keep them from freezing would never work in Toronto.

 On nights when the temperature dips below 5 degrees Celsius here, police
have the authority to use force, if necessary, to load up homeless people
in vans and take them to huge temporary shelters set up in local armouries.

 Some of the temporary shelters have room for up to 1,000 people, but
cramming so many homeless people into one area has created an entirely new
set of problems for the city.

 Lastman says that the compassionate approach Toronto is trying to bring to
its homeless doesn't seem to be as important here.

 ``They feel that they are showing compassion in a much deeper way, and
their tough love is that (the homeless) should be under a roof,'' Lastman
told reporters after his meeting with Giuliani.

 ``I believe in the principle, but I also don't want to see people yelling
and screaming that they don't want to go inside. I don't want people
dragged'' against their will, he said.

 ``I really fear that if we did start doing that, and people started
hiding, how do we help them? We can't get them blankets, we can't get them
coffee. That's the problem with this way.''

 Giuliani has earned a reputation as a mayor willing to take a hard line to
clean up this city's streets and make them safer.

 He has succeeded in pushing the estimated 18,000 homeless people in the
city away from the Manhattan tourist areas, and Giuliani told reporters
yesterday that ``they have gone a lot of different places.''

 ``Some are in various forms of assisted housing. The way we have
approached the homeless problem . . . is that there is no such individual
thing as homelessness.

`They should be taken off the street and jailed'

- New York Mayor Rudolph Giuliani


 ``When you refer to people as homeless, you either make them too
sympathetic or too unsympathetic, because of your political biases. People
that are homeless have a specific problem that needs to be addressed,''
Giuliani said.

 ``Some have problems like alcohol or drug addiction. You've got to deal
with that. Some are straight, out-and-out violent criminals who are
homeless and violate other people.

 ``They should be arrested, they should be taken off the street and jailed.''

 Lastman, who was to speak today to the Canadian Society of New York and
meet with investment bankers, conceded he was somewhat surprised by the
siege mentality at New York's city hall. Visitors are required to state
their business and provide photo identification to various police officers
outside. Inside, police use metal detectors and scanning devices.

 Back in Toronto yesterday, the chair of the TTC proposed subway stations
be used as collection points to raise money for the homeless. A fundraising
drive would be preferable to having TTC security shooing away people who
use the stations as a place to get warm, Howard Moscoe said.

 Moscoe is proposing that collection boxes be located at collector booths
in the stations.

END FROWARD
-
** NOTICE: In accordance with Title 17 U.S.C. Section 107, this material is
distributed without profit to those who have expressed a prior interest in
receiving the included information for research and educational purposes. **

HOMELESS PEOPLE'S NETWORK  <http://aspin.asu.edu/hpn/>  Home Page
ARCHIVES  <http://aspin.asu.edu/hpn/archives.html>  read posts to HPN
TO JOIN  <http://aspin.asu.edu/hpn/join.html> or email Tom <wgcp@earthlink.net>
--============_-1300595172==_ma============
Content-Type: text/enriched; charset="us-ascii"

http://www2.thestar.com/thestar/editorial/toronto/981119NEW03b_CI-MEL19.html

FWD  Toronto Star - November 19, 1998     

          [editorial] Greater Toronto Story:



<paraindent><param>right,left</param>LASTMAN FINDS NEW YORK TOUGH ON
HOMELESS

BUT HE LIKES DRACKDOWN ON SQUEEGEE KIDS


By  Jack Lakey - Toronto Star - City Hall Bureau

</paraindent>


 NEW YORK - Toronto Mayor Mel Lastman has ruled out this city's method
for keeping homeless people from freezing to death on the street -
using force to move them to temporary shelters. 


 Lastman began a three-day trade mission here yesterday by meeting with
New York Mayor Rudolph Giuliani, who explained how this city has dealt
with homelessness, squeegeeing and motorists who run red lights.


 Lastman likes what they have done here to get rid of squeegee people:
banning them. And he loves the success New York has had in catching
red-light runners: the city's 30 roving cameras gather evidence from
various intersections, and fines are levied.


 However, Lastman says that forcibly removing the homeless from the
streets to keep them from freezing would never work in Toronto.


 On nights when the temperature dips below 5 degrees Celsius here,
police have the authority to use force, if necessary, to load up
homeless people in vans and take them to huge temporary shelters set up
in local armouries.


 Some of the temporary shelters have room for up to 1,000 people, but
cramming so many homeless people into one area has created an entirely
new set of problems for the city.


 Lastman says that the compassionate approach Toronto is trying to
bring to its homeless doesn't seem to be as important here.


 ``They feel that they are showing compassion in a much deeper way, and
their tough love is that (the homeless) should be under a roof,''
Lastman told reporters after his meeting with Giuliani.


 ``I believe in the principle, but I also don't want to see people
yelling and screaming that they don't want to go inside. I don't want
people dragged'' against their will, he said.


 ``I really fear that if we did start doing that, and people started
hiding, how do we help them? We can't get them blankets, we can't get
them coffee. That's the problem with this way.''


 Giuliani has earned a reputation as a mayor willing to take a hard
line to clean up this city's streets and make them safer.


 He has succeeded in pushing the estimated 18,000 homeless people in
the city away from the Manhattan tourist areas, and Giuliani told
reporters yesterday that ``they have gone a lot of different places.''


 ``Some are in various forms of assisted housing. The way we have
approached the homeless problem . . . is that there is no such
individual thing as homelessness.


`They should be taken off the street and jailed'


- New York Mayor Rudolph Giuliani


 

 ``When you refer to people as homeless, you either make them too
sympathetic or too unsympathetic, because of your political biases.
People that are homeless have a specific problem that needs to be
addressed,'' Giuliani said.


 ``Some have problems like alcohol or drug addiction. You've got to
deal with that. Some are straight, out-and-out violent criminals who
are homeless and violate other people.


 ``They should be arrested, they should be taken off the street and
jailed.''


 Lastman, who was to speak today to the Canadian Society of New York
and meet with investment bankers, conceded he was somewhat surprised by
the siege mentality at New York's city hall. Visitors are required to
state their business and provide photo identification to various police
officers outside. Inside, police use metal detectors and scanning
devices.


 Back in Toronto yesterday, the chair of the TTC proposed subway
stations be used as collection points to raise money for the homeless.
A fundraising drive would be preferable to having TTC security shooing
away people who use the stations as a place to get warm, Howard Moscoe
said. 


 Moscoe is proposing that collection boxes be located at collector
booths in the stations.


END FROWARD

- 

** NOTICE: In accordance with Title 17 U.S.C. Section 107, this material is distributed without profit to those who have expressed a prior interest in receiving the included information for research and educational purposes. **


HOMELESS PEOPLE'S NETWORK  <<http://aspin.asu.edu/hpn/>  Home Page

ARCHIVES  <<http://aspin.asu.edu/hpn/archives.html>  read posts to HPN

TO JOIN  <<http://aspin.asu.edu/hpn/join.html> or email Tom <<wgcp@earthlink.net>

--============_-1300595172==_ma============--