ALERT: Berkeley, CA: 75 arrested in Telegraph Ave. Homeless Sweeps

Tom Boland (wgcp@earthlink.net)
Thu, 12 Nov 1998 11:16:58 -0400


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http://www.hotcoco.com/sitesearch/serchdex.htm [searchstring "homeless"]
FWD  Contra Costa Times [Edition: WCT] 11 Nov 1998  Page A-3


TELEGRAPH CLEANUP WILL CONTINUE

Berkeley City Council approves a 68-point plan to
restore the avenue's economic, cultural health

By Chuck Squatriglia
Times Staff Writer


BERKELEY -- The latest effort to spit-shine
Telegraph Avenue has, by most accounts, worked.
Gone are the drug dealers, the homeless kids and
the dirty sidewalks plaguing Berkeley's most
famous street, swept away by an army of police and
city workers summoned by a City Council fed up
with the problem.

"It's a dramatic change," said Andy Ross, owner of
Cody's Books, a Telegraph icon. "They need to
continue whatever it is they're doing."

On Tuesday night, the City Council decided to do
just that. In an uncommon show of solidarity, it
approved a sweeping, 68-point plan to restore
Telegraph's economic prosperity and preserve its
eclectic personality.

But that solidarity was tested when debate turned
to three ordinances opposed by the city's
progressives.

Those laws would have outlawed sitting in line on
sidewalks along Telegraph and Shattuck Avenue and
barred dogs and skateboards in those areas.
Those ordinances, however, were referred to a
subcommittee for further study.

Critics argued the laws, clearly aimed at
Telegraph's homeless young adults, are unfair and
unnecessary. "We're not doing anything to solve
the problem. We're just arresting the poor and
warehousing the homeless," said Sally Hindman,
executive director of the Chaplaincy to the
Homeless.

But the plan drew more advocates than critics. UC-
Berkeley Chancellor Robert Berdahl told the
council Telegraph Avenue's decline had drawn the
attention and concern of Cal parents across the
state.

"Berkeley is gaining a reputation as an unsafe
community," Berdahl said. "The well-being of the
city and UC and our ability to recruit the best
students is at stake."

The city's plan provides more services to the
homeless, more frequent cleaning of public
restrooms and more street lights. It also would
install three police call boxes in the area.
>
Police will continue their stepped-up presence on
Telegraph, but City Manager Kim Keene is
suggesting a "wait-and-see" approach to Mayor
Shirley Dean's call for five new police officers,
which would cost the city $1.3 million.

The city's plan comes after the council, hoping to
stem dwindling revenues and prevent the loss of
several key businesses, recently told the police
to crack down on troublemakers.

Police have arrested 75 people during the last
three weeks, including 45 nabbed for drug
offenses, said police Capt. Bobby Miller. Many of
those arrested have violated "quality of life"
laws such as public intoxication, disorderly
conduct and the like, he said.

END FORWARD
-

HOMELESS PEOPLE'S NETWORK  <http://aspin.asu.edu/hpn/>  Home Page
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FWD  Contra Costa Times [Edition: WCT] 11 Nov 1998  Page A-3



<paraindent><param>right,left</param>TELEGRAPH CLEANUP WILL CONTINUE


Berkeley City Council approves a 68-point plan to

restore the avenue's economic, cultural health


By Chuck Squatriglia

Times Staff Writer

</paraindent>


BERKELEY -- The latest effort to spit-shine

Telegraph Avenue has, by most accounts, worked.

Gone are the drug dealers, the homeless kids and

the dirty sidewalks plaguing Berkeley's most

famous street, swept away by an army of police and

city workers summoned by a City Council fed up

with the problem.


"It's a dramatic change," said Andy Ross, owner of

Cody's Books, a Telegraph icon. "They need to

continue whatever it is they're doing."


On Tuesday night, the City Council decided to do

just that. In an uncommon show of solidarity, it

approved a sweeping, 68-point plan to restore

Telegraph's economic prosperity and preserve its

eclectic personality.


But that solidarity was tested when debate turned

to three ordinances opposed by the city's

progressives.


Those laws would have outlawed sitting in line on

sidewalks along Telegraph and Shattuck Avenue and

barred dogs and skateboards in those areas.

Those ordinances, however, were referred to a

subcommittee for further study.


Critics argued the laws, clearly aimed at

Telegraph's homeless young adults, are unfair and

unnecessary. "We're not doing anything to solve

the problem. We're just arresting the poor and

warehousing the homeless," said Sally Hindman,

executive director of the Chaplaincy to the

Homeless.


But the plan drew more advocates than critics. UC-

Berkeley Chancellor Robert Berdahl told the

council Telegraph Avenue's decline had drawn the

attention and concern of Cal parents across the

state.


"Berkeley is gaining a reputation as an unsafe

community," Berdahl said. "The well-being of the

city and UC and our ability to recruit the best

students is at stake."


The city's plan provides more services to the

homeless, more frequent cleaning of public

restrooms and more street lights. It also would

install three police call boxes in the area.

>

Police will continue their stepped-up presence on

Telegraph, but City Manager Kim Keene is

suggesting a "wait-and-see" approach to Mayor

Shirley Dean's call for five new police officers,

which would cost the city $1.3 million.


The city's plan comes after the council, hoping to

stem dwindling revenues and prevent the loss of

several key businesses, recently told the police

to crack down on troublemakers.


Police have arrested 75 people during the last

three weeks, including 45 nabbed for drug

offenses, said police Capt. Bobby Miller. Many of

those arrested have violated "quality of life"

laws such as public intoxication, disorderly

conduct and the like, he said.


END FORWARD

-

HOMELESS PEOPLE'S NETWORK  <<http://aspin.asu.edu/hpn/>  Home Page

ARCHIVES  <<http://aspin.asu.edu/hpn/archives.html>  read posts to HPN

TO JOIN  <<http://aspin.asu.edu/hpn/join.html> or email Tom <<wgcp@earthlink.net>

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