commissioner bashes homeless "parasites" in reelection bid

Tom Boland (wgcp@earthlink.net)
Sun, 1 Nov 1998 16:18:43 -0400


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http://www.dispatch.com:80/pan/localarchive/dstoknws.html
FWD  Columbus [Ohio] Dispatch - October 22, 1998

"The frustrating things in the job for me right now is working with street
people, the transients,'' Stokes said. "We're trying to get most of them
into a program that will garner some self-respect. The other ones that
won't respond positively to that will soak up time in our jails and become
parasites in the community. I'm just not inclined to spend taxpayer money
continuing to pander to their disease and the recycling of those
transients.''
-- Franklin County [Ohio] Commissioner Dewey R. Stokes [quoted in article
below]

FURR VYING TO UNSEAT STOKES AS COMMISSIONER
Incumbent to focus on transportation, growth

By Bruce Cadwallader - Dispatch County Offices Reporter

Franklin County Commissioner Dewey R. Stokes can remember slogging through
a sewage-filled ditch two years ago for a homeowner complaining about
mosquitoes in the neighborhood.

Now, with a federal grant and the Ohio Environmental Protection Agency's
help, that neighborhood problem will be solved. Stokes says that is one
example of how he is literally willing to get his hands dirty for a
constituent -- while at the same time showing the frustration he has dealt
with in trying to solve problems.

Stokes is trying to win re-election to his second term as commissioner. He
will face Democratic patent attorney Jeff Furr on Nov. 3.

Before his first countywide win in 1994, Stokes spent 28 years in law
enforcement, the last eight as national president of the Fraternal Order of
Police.

"The first term has been fairly successful,'' Stokes said. "After you get
settled in and read some of the state law, you find out what you can't do
and what you can do. There's some wonderful things my opponent is
proposing, but what he hasn't done as a lawyer is read the state law about
what he can do here. Some of the suggestions he's making are in opposition
to the law.''

Stokes said he has found he can't do it all alone. He has built rapport
with other county officeholders and Commissioners Arlene Shoemaker and
Dorothy Teater, both Republicans, who are not on the ballot this year.

The trio recently has been focused on federally mandated welfare reduction
and providing day care, health care and transportation for the working poor.

"We've taken away all the legitimate arguments on why someone should remain
on welfare. We've put 8,000 people on welfare back to work,'' Stokes said.

He is not so tolerant of the homeless.

"The frustrating things in the job for me right now is working with street
people, the transients,'' Stokes said. "We're trying to get most of them
into a program that will garner some self-respect. The other ones that
won't respond positively to that will soak up time in our jails and become
parasites in the community. I'm just not inclined to spend taxpayer money
continuing to pander to their disease and the recycling of those
transients.''

Stokes said in the next term he would focus on mass transportation in
central Ohio and continued economic growth, especially at the trade-free
zone at Rickenbacker Airport.

Stokes has spent some time talking about families this year as well and
hopes commissioners can continue to support educational and entertainment
opportunities, such as the Franklin Park Conservatory, Columbus Clippers
and the new COSI.

"If they just take time to take their kid there, a few programs or took
them to a baseball game or two we'd see a reduction in juvenile crime
because that's part of prevention,'' Stokes said. "If government can
provide that, the city or the county, that is repaying the taxpayer for
what they put in. But there's people who never take advantage of it.''

Stokes said he puts in full-time hours as a commissioner, even though the
state defines the position as part- time. He said he is not ready to leave.

"I hope I'm receptive enough to know when that is and leave when it's the
right time,'' Stokes said.

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FWD  Columbus [Ohio] Dispatch - October 22, 1998


"The frustrating things in the job for me right now is working with
street people, the transients,'' Stokes said. "We're trying to get most
of them into a program that will garner some self-respect. The other
ones that won't respond positively to that will soak up time in our
jails and become parasites in the community. I'm just not inclined to
spend taxpayer money continuing to pander to their disease and the
recycling of those transients.''

-- Franklin County [Ohio] Commissioner Dewey R. Stokes [quoted in
article below]


<paraindent><param>right,left</param>FURR VYING TO UNSEAT STOKES AS
COMMISSIONER

Incumbent to focus on transportation, growth 

</paraindent>

By Bruce Cadwallader - Dispatch County Offices Reporter 


Franklin County Commissioner Dewey R. Stokes can remember slogging
through a sewage-filled ditch two years ago for a homeowner complaining
about mosquitoes in the neighborhood.


Now, with a federal grant and the Ohio Environmental Protection
Agency's help, that neighborhood problem will be solved. Stokes says
that is one example of how he is literally willing to get his hands
dirty for a constituent -- while at the same time showing the
frustration he has dealt with in trying to solve problems.


Stokes is trying to win re-election to his second term as commissioner.
He will face Democratic patent attorney Jeff Furr on Nov. 3.


Before his first countywide win in 1994, Stokes spent 28 years in law
enforcement, the last eight as national president of the Fraternal
Order of Police. 


"The first term has been fairly successful,'' Stokes said. "After you
get settled in and read some of the state law, you find out what you
can't do and what you can do. There's some wonderful things my opponent
is proposing, but what he hasn't done as a lawyer is read the state law
about what he can do here. Some of the suggestions he's making are in
opposition to the law.''


Stokes said he has found he can't do it all alone. He has built rapport
with other county officeholders and Commissioners Arlene Shoemaker and
Dorothy Teater, both Republicans, who are not on the ballot this year.


The trio recently has been focused on federally mandated welfare
reduction and providing day care, health care and transportation for
the working poor.


"We've taken away all the legitimate arguments on why someone should
remain on welfare. We've put 8,000 people on welfare back to work,''
Stokes said. 


He is not so tolerant of the homeless.


"The frustrating things in the job for me right now is working with
street people, the transients,'' Stokes said. "We're trying to get most
of them into a program that will garner some self-respect. The other
ones that won't respond positively to that will soak up time in our
jails and become parasites in the community. I'm just not inclined to
spend taxpayer money continuing to pander to their disease and the
recycling of those transients.''


Stokes said in the next term he would focus on mass transportation in
central Ohio and continued economic growth, especially at the
trade-free zone at Rickenbacker Airport. 


Stokes has spent some time talking about families this year as well and
hopes commissioners can continue to support educational and
entertainment opportunities, such as the Franklin Park Conservatory,
Columbus Clippers and the new COSI.


"If they just take time to take their kid there, a few programs or took
them to a baseball game or two we'd see a reduction in juvenile crime
because that's part of prevention,'' Stokes said. "If government can
provide that, the city or the county, that is repaying the taxpayer for
what they put in. But there's people who never take advantage of it.''


Stokes said he puts in full-time hours as a commissioner, even though
the state defines the position as part- time. He said he is not ready
to leave.


"I hope I'm receptive enough to know when that is and leave when it's
the right time,'' Stokes said.


END FORWARD 

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