Tedrico's Page is Updated! (5/08)

Theodore Latham (tedrico@hotmail.com)
Sat, 09 May 1998 06:53:49 PDT


Fri, May 8, 1998

Hi There!

     Tedrico's Page has been updated! I regret to inform you that, 
due to my e-mail service crashing this past Tuesday, I lost many of your 
SURVEY SEZ responses as well as the names and address of people who had 
requested to be placed on this update mailing list! So, the current 
survey will remain for 1 extra week and the results will be posted next 
Saturday!

     For those of you who are new to my mailing list, Tedrico's Page was 
nominated for the April-May round of the WebGuide Awards '98 on 3/16/98! 
Voting will last until 5/12/98. You may cast your vote ONCE per week, so 
if you've already voted, please be sure to vote again each week over the 
next 3 weeks! Your Vote can be placed at the following URL by entering 
your email address and selecting Tedrico's Page:

http://www.geocities.com/SiliconValley/Bay/7145/vote.htm?0508

     What's NEW at Tedrico's Page ... Homeless Information Language 
Translator and  Charitable Children News Flash!!!! Visit What's New 
to find your link to these latest site additions! Homeless 
Headlines, Shelters and Soup Kitchens In the News, Upcoming Homeless 
Conferences, Statistics Say, Shelters -N- Soup Kitchens, and Help 
for the Homeless have all been UPDATED this week!

    Also, for your e-mail privacy and to eliminate the possibility 
of spammers seizing and abusing this mailing list, I have condensed the 
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I'd like to Thank each and every one of you on all, now (3), site update 
lists for visiting Tedrico's Page on a regular basis (those 
who do) and helping this site to achieve a 95.8% increase in visits, for 
the month last month, from the Month of March (when I changed servers)! 
Click on the following link to see the increase:

http://members.xoom.com/tedrico/siteinfo.html#sitestats?0508

     If French or Spanish is the only language that you understand, then 
you will need to translate this site's vast information using 
the NEW Homeless Information Language Translator. Ever wonder how 
and why so many Veterans are homeless today? Get the REAL deal on 
Homeless Vets under Homeless Veterans segment. Need a place to lay your 
head or get a bite to eat? You'll find it under the always updated 
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improve your situation for FREE through the Homeless Online 
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broad spectrum of resources at Tedrico's Page! SEE who the 
homeless are and FEEL what they are up against by reading their stories 
from the streets under the Meet the Homeless segment. Learn how you can 
do your part and correctly teach your child to help the homeless on the 
Help for the Homeless page. For those of you who are still on the 
streets and don't know what to do during shelter shut down hours, visit 
the Closed Shelter Pass-Times page ... you'll find 
a way to make time go by here! Also, as always, catch up on the 
latest world news events & stay abreast of happenings in the world 
of the homeless, and a whole lot more, all at Tedrico's Page ..... "Your 
Informative Homelessness Resource!"

AND NOW, FOR A RECAP OF THIS WEEK'S HOMELESS HAPPENINGS ..............
______________________________________________________________________

URGENT! 
-------

    If anyone who has received a Tedrico's Page Voice of the 
Homeless Award still has a copy of their award letter, I would 
appreciate it if you would forward a copy of it to me! Thank You :)

COMING SOON!
------------

    Homeless Health Issues & Remedies is the next scheduled installment 
coming soon to Tedrico's Page! Look for it, as always, around the 
beginning of next month!

A SPECIAL THANKS
----------------

    Tedrico's Page would like to THANK and acknowledge Mario A. 
Banda <mabanda@swbell.net> for his voluntary contribution to the 
voluntary efforts of continually updating and maintaining this 
web site! Mario says, "I realize that I am only a couple of pay 
checks away from being homeless. That is the reason I try to live 
my live in a simple manner. I'm a firm believer of "Voluntary 
Simplicity"!

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TEDRICO'S PAGE SELECTED: DISCUSSION TOPIC OF THE WEEK

     Each week Tedrico's Page scavenges the WWW in search of a 
controversial homeless discussion topic, and presents it to you, in 
hopes of gathering varied and invaluable feedback for analysis:

On Mon, 27 Apr 1998 02:18:11 (EST) LOUIS LOPEZ <lopez737@warwick.net> 
wrote:

Subject: Re: "The Pursuit of Happiness"

If I had a house and a car in an area where it was required for me 
to drive to work due to the fact that all the places where I can 
work are too far for anyone to walk to or even ride a bike to, and 
I can't have insurance on my car becuase the rates are too high, 
are state laws of requiring a car to have insurance denying me the right 
of a job and the persuit of happiness?
*******************
LOUIS LOPEZ


----------
RESPONSES:
----------

On Tuesday, May 05, 1998 4:36 AM Tedrico Latham 
<tedrico@hotmail.com> replied:

No, the low wage rate paid by the job , which prevents you from 
being able to afford car insurance, is denying you the pursuit of 
happiness! Next trick question :)
----------------

On Tue, 5 May 1998 08:39:14 -0400 "Breck Daughtrey" 
<bdaught@city.norfolk.va.us> remarked:

Obviously, the answer to the hypothetical question is: No.  State 
law requiring auto insurance has no relationship to denying the subject 
a job. He's free to accept the job and ride the bus, 
carpool or move closer to the job among other options.  The very premise 
of the question is egocentric in the extreme - he's 
probably contemplating suing the company because it wouldn't move 
the business within walking distance of him.
---------------

On Tue, 05 May 1998 15:39:16 -0400 Colleen Reiter 
<creiter@mindspring.com> responded:

Hi Tedrico--- My thoughts are if Louis can afford a house and a car then 
he should be able to afford the car insurance. With low wages, sounds 
like he needs to sell the house, stabilize the finances, get 
an aptmt. & some car insurance. You're very astute when you say, 
"next trick question"... Maybe it's a law student with a little too much 
time on his hands????
---------------

On Wed, 06 May 1998 22:17:49 -0400 Susan Mason 
<smason1@erols.com> answered:

ALTHOUGH I AGREE WITH YOUR RESPONSE TO THE QUESTION FROM LOUIS, I 
ALSO THINK THAT THERE IS ANOTHER FACTOR IN THIS SITUATION AFFECTING HIS 
PURSUIT TO HAPPINESS.  CONSIDER THE INSURANCE INDUSTRY PRACTICES IN THIS 
COUNTRY THAT AFFECT LOW INCOME PEOPLE.  THE CAR INSURANCE INDUSTRY SAYS 
THAT THEY SET THEIR RATES ACCORDING TO STATISTICS...
SUCH AS ..HOW MANY ACCIDENTS OCCUR IN A GIVEN LOCATION.

MORE ACCIDENTS OCCUR IN THE CITY THAN IN THE COUNTY...SO RATES FOR 
A CITY RESIDENT ARE HIGHER THAN A COUNTY RESIDENT..AT LEAST THAT IS TRUE 
HERE IN RICHMOND.  I WOULD SAY IT IS SAFE TO ASSUME THAT THIS 'RATE 
SYSTEM' IS FOUND IN MOST MAJOR CITIES AS WELL.  WHERE ARE 
MOST OF THE POOR AND HOMELESS LOCATED?  PRIMARILY IN THE CITY 
LIMITS...RIGHT?  IN LOUIS'S HYPOTHETICAL SITUATION, HIS PRIMARY PROBLEM 
IS THE INABILITY TO PAY THE INSURANCE RATES REQUIRED FOR 
HIS VEHICLE SET BY THE INSURANCE INDUSTRY.  I WOULD HAVE TO SAY 
THAT LOUIS'S PURSUIT OF HAPPINESS WAS AFFECTED BY THE INSURANCE INDUSTRY 
AS WELL AS THE LOW WAGE RATE.
---------------

On Sat, 9 May 1998 01:30:20 EDT DaniC541 <DaniC541@aol.com> 
said: 

There are a lot of Louises in the system, me for one, and you 
should know if you are Louis.  I find it hard to believe that one 
can have a technical outlook on the problem.  That is exactly the 
reason, we, the people of the system, either lives high on the 
hog, or down at the bottom--homeless.

There is so much loophople and technicality--that supports the employer 
and the insurance companies--it leaves all the Louis 
Lopezes of this world short of realizing the pursuit of happiness 
-- We're always too damn busy working for the employers' and 
insurance companies' pursuit of happiness, because of these 
guidelines, loopholes and technicalities--they do not have to 
worry about Louis Lopez's dilemna--all of us Louis Lopezes 
protect and insure that they will get their share of pursuit of 
happiness by quarreling amongst ourselves about which of the 
factors are right or related to what...of course they are all 
related....equated....formulated....to serve who? not you, Louis Lopez! 
and certainly not me.  How about the homeless?

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

WELFARE IN THE AIR .....


Reforming Welfare Reform:
There is a Humane Alternative

    The Cellucci administration is proudly trumpeting the fact that 
Massachusetts's welfare caseload is at its lowest level in 24 years. 
Since 
the state's sweeping welfare reform of 1995, 27,000 recipients have left 
the rolls. But what looks good in a press release isn't so pretty in 
real 
life. (Doubters should read "On the Edge," our report on five 
families struggling near the welfare line.) As welfare reform has kicked 
in, emergency shelters and food banks have been reporting 
sharp increases in the number of people seeking their help because they 
can no longer turn to the state. And as two-year time limits 
on benefits expire, social services will be strained even further.

    According to human-services workers, today's welfare-reform success 
will breed tomorrow's swollen underclass. While the state 
is indeed moving people off welfare, it could do far more to help 
them stay off. Right now, the state is giving welfare recipients a swift 
kick rather than a jump-start, relegating all but the 
luckiest to the kinds of lives that prompted the introduction of welfare 
60 years ago. It is possible to achieve welfare reform in 
a more humane way. In some cases, improvements are just a 
legislative okay away. Here are some suggestions for how 
Massachusetts can give people a ladder to climb out of dependency 
and into self-sufficient lives -- with their dignity intact. 

    Count education toward work requirements. Education, which 
brings better jobs at higher wages, is one of the surest escape 
routes from welfare. But perversely, welfare reform has blocked 
educational opportunities for thousands of recipients. By cutting 
off benefits after two years, the law doesn't allow most people 
enough time to complete even a community-college education. And 
for those recipients with school-age children, requirements that 
they earn benefits through work, or by performing 20 hours of community 
service a week, make education even harder to attain. 
Right now, education and vocational training are not counted toward that 
20 hours. A bill to correct that has gone nowhere. The 
legislature should pass it into law.

    Reward grandparents for raising their children's children. 
Politicians complain about the decline of "family values," but they 
haven't put their votes where their rhetoric is. Relatives raising 
the children of parents who are either unable or unwilling to care 
for their own kids now receive only a third of the benefits provided to 
foster parents. A bill to give grandparents parity is currently stalled 
in committee. One concern is cost, but nobody has even bothered to 
figure out how many grandparents are raising their grandchildren. 

    Expand health care benefits. Last year, Massachusetts expanded 
Medicaid benefits to cover families living at 133 percent of 
poverty level ($21,000 per year for a family of four). That's a 
good start, but it doesn't go far enough. A plan to expand Medicaid 
again -- to cover families living at 200 percent of poverty level 
($32,000 for a family of four) -- is currently stuck in the State House. 
Holding it up is Acting Governor Cellucci's desire to charge parents 
earning between $21,000 and $32,000 a monthly premium of 
$10 per child (to a maximum of $30). This is not unreasonable, and 
perhaps a compromise can be struck -- say, by setting the cap at 
$20. In the interests of providing this state's children with basic 
health care, all parties should bend a little. Reaching a deal 
would take care of just about every child in this state. But it 
would still leave many poor single people and childless couples without 
insurance. They too, deserve a second look.

    Make emergency shelter more accessible. The state hasn't 
adjusted the income level that determines eligibility for emergency 
shelter since 1986. Right now, a family of four made homeless by 
eviction, domestic violence, fire, or other crises must make less 
than $1235 a month to qualify for emergency shelter. Homeless 
parents who buy into welfare reform and get jobs often find 
themselves thrown out of shelters because, based on this woefully 
outdated threshold, they suddenly earn too much. The income 
guidelines must be revised. Massachusetts should also reinstate a 
rule it abandoned three years ago, mandating that homeless people 
be placed in an emergency shelter within a 20-mile radius of their home 
community.

What do you think?

Send an e-mail to <letters@phx.com> and a duplicate to 
<tedrico@hotmail.com>

source Boston Phoenix Editorial

http://www.bostonphoenix.com:80/archive/features/98/04/02/EDITORIAL.html

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

IN CASE YOU DID'NT KNOW .....


1. How big is America's homeless population? 

    At least 230,000 homeless use shelters and soup kitchens in our 
nation's cities (100,000 + population) at any given time. Extrapolations 
from these data suggest that at any given time 
between 500,000 and 600,000 individuals are homeless. Most likely, 
1 to 1.5 million persons in the United States were homeless at some time 
in 1987. 

2. What are some of the traits of homeless adults? 

    Among the 194,000 homeless adults in large cities who used services 
in 1987, 80  percent were male, 54 percent nonwhite, and almost half had 
not graduated from  high school (compared with 19 percent for all U.S. 
adults). 

    Over half reported at least one major physical health problem. 

    Average monthly income per person was $135, less than one-third the 
federal poverty level. 

    The homeless have been jobless longer than they have been homeless: 
in 1987, about half the homeless had not held a steady job in more than 
two years. 

3. How many homeless have mental health or substance abuse problems? 

    Half of the urban service-using homeless in 1987 reported sufficient 
depression and demoralization to indicate the need for immediate 
treatment. One-fifth reported a history of mental hospitalization, and 
the same fraction had attempted suicide. Women who had children with 
them had five times the rate of suicide 
attempts for U.S. adults; single homeless people had even higher 
rates of attempted suicide. One-third of the urban homeless who 
used services in 1987 had been patients in a detoxification or 
alcohol/drug treatment center. 

4. How many homeless had been incarcerated? 

    Sixty percent of the single men and 22 percent of the single 
women had spent more than three or four days in a county jail. 
Almost 29 percent of single men and 2 percent of all women had 
served time in a state or federal prison. 

5. What portion of the urban homeless are children? 

    About 35,000. Ten percent of the households who are homeless at 
a single point in time are families with children, but over the 
course of a year a much higher proportion of the homeless are 
families with children. 

6. How long do people tend to be homeless? 

    Time homeless varies. Single point-in-time data such as those 
gathered in 1987 exaggerate the proportion of homeless who are long 
term. One-fifth of the 1987 survey sample were homeless three months or 
less, and the same portion were homeless four years or more. Households 
with children are likely to be homeless for shorter 
periods than single people. Other data from specific cities suggest that 
perhaps only 10 to 15 percent of homeless singles remain 
homeless for 6 months or more; family homelessness lasts even less time. 

7. Do soup kitchens and shelters meet the needs of the nation's 
homeless? 

    Despite enormous growth in the 1980s of such services, in March 
1987, U.S. cities had roughly 120,000 shelter beds available, amounting 
to less than half the estimated number of homeless people using 
services. The number of meals available provided an average of only 1.4 
meals per day for each homeless person. 

8. Who funds services for the homeless? 

    At the end of the 1980s, 65 percent of shelter operating 
expenses came from government and only 35 percent from private sources. 
But individuals, religious congregations, and charitable organizations 
still run most of the programs and provide most of the labor, goods, and 
services that help the homeless. State and local governments contribute 
between half and three-fourths of government funding. 

9. What current policies and programs affect homelessness? 

    Under new eligibility requirements for income support programs such 
as Supplemental Security Income, Food Stamps, and some state General 
Assistance programs, fewer homeless people will have access 
to these resources. Also, welfare program changes and the reduced 
availability of new housing assistance vouchers will diminish resources 
to help prevent or curtail family homelessness. 

10. What does research point to as effective ways to combat 
homelessness? 

    Provide food, shelter, and health care to the already homeless; 
voluntary and religious sectors are doing this fairly effectively, 
but services still do not meet need. Help the already homeless into 
permanent housing and self-sufficiency; such initiatives require 
substantial funding and professional staffing, thus government will have 
to be a primary supporter. 

    Develop better public policies to keep people from becoming homeless 
in the first place. Current federal housing policies fail 
to address the need for permanent low-income housing. Often families 
cannot get access to support services in their communities that 
could keep them from homelessness. 

Source The Urban Institute

http://www.urban.org/

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SOME FINAL WORDS ........

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UNTIL NEXT WEEK ....................

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Regards,

Tedrico Latham

_________________________
TEDRICO'S PAGE
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