Police may guard 199 polls - June 2, 1999

Graeme Bacque (gbacque@idirect.com)
Wed, 02 Jun 1999 15:16:56 -0400


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http://www.thestar.com/editorial/news/990602NEW07c_NA-POLICE2.html

Police may guard 199 polls 

By Joel Baglole 
Toronto Star Staff Reporter

Several hundred police may be out keeping the peace at election polls
tomorrow. 

Sharon Marlow, returning officer for Toronto Centre-Rosedale, is
planning to put one police officer at each of her riding's 199 polling
stations on election day, Warren Bailie, Ontario's chief election
officer, confirmed. 

Bailie said that, under Section 41 of the Elections Act, returning
officers in each provincial riding can take whatever measures they want
to ensure order is maintained when people cast their votes, including
hiring police. 

Bailie also said returning officers don't need to get permission from
Elections Ontario before hiring security. 


``It's not up to me,'' he said. ``My office will pay whatever security
bills (it) receives from the ridings.''

Ridings use a variety of security tactics to keep peace at the polls,
said Bailie, including hiring local firemen and hockey players to act as
bouncers. 

Penny Johnston, who is on standby to work at a polling station in
Toronto Centre-Rosedale tomorrow, said police officers are being
considered because a fist fight broke out at one of the riding's polling
stations during the last municipal election in November, 1997. 

Johnston added there's concern that the line-up to see the revising
agent - for people who aren't on the voters' list - will be extra long
at each poll as no enumeration was conducted in this election. 

Acting Sergeant Syd Richardson of Toronto police said officers can't
volunteer at the polls, but could work as paid duty officers if
requested to by the provincial government.
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News Story: Police may guard 199 polls - June 2, 1999
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June 2, 1999
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Ontario Votes

Police may guard 199 polls

By Joel Baglole
Toronto Star Staff Reporter

Several hundred police may be out keeping the peace at election polls tomorrow.

Sharon Marlow, returning officer for Toronto Centre-Rosedale, is planning to put one police officer at each of her riding's 199 polling stations on election day, Warren Bailie, Ontario's chief election officer, confirmed.

Bailie said that, under Section 41 of the Elections Act, returning officers in each provincial riding can take whatever measures they want to ensure order is maintained when people cast their votes, including hiring police.

Bailie also said returning officers don't need to get permission from Elections Ontario before hiring security.

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  • ``It's not up to me,'' he said. ``My office will pay whatever security bills (it) receives from the ridings.''

    Ridings use a variety of security tactics to keep peace at the polls, said Bailie, including hiring local firemen and hockey players to act as bouncers.

    Penny Johnston, who is on standby to work at a polling station in Toronto Centre-Rosedale tomorrow, said police officers are being considered because a fist fight broke out at one of the riding's polling stations during the last municipal election in November, 1997.

    Johnston added there's concern that the line-up to see the revising agent - for people who aren't on the voters' list - will be extra long at each poll as no enumeration was conducted in this election.

    Acting Sergeant Syd Richardson of Toronto police said officers can't volunteer at the polls, but could work as paid duty officers if requested to by the provincial government.

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