City of Toronto: Public Health - Beat the Heat!

Graeme Bacque (gbacque@idirect.com)
Tue, 06 Jul 1999 05:07:16 -0400


(The draft alert was faxed to me last week and contained a list of some
of the medications commonly associated with increased risk of
heat-related injury. - Graeme)

----------forwarded message----------

http://www.city.toronto.on.ca/health/beatheat.htm


> [*]                How to Beat the Heat
>                    Summer Safety: Heat, Drugs and Alcohol
> [*]services        Medications and Heat-Related Illness
> [*]emergency       ------------------------------------------------------
>    services
> [*]departments     How to Beat the Heat
> [Line]             In the summer the combination of high heat and high
> [*]get involved    humidity can be very dangerous. Those especially at
>                    risk during these weather conditions include;
> [*]"how do I...?"
> [*]city directory     * The elderly
>                       * People with certain chronic illnesses, such as
> [*]contact us           heart conditions or people unable to move or
> [*]site map             change position by themselves
>                       * Infants and preschool children
>                       * People who exercise vigorously or are involved
>                         in strenuous work outdoors for prolonged periods
>                       * People taking certain medications, for example,
>                         for mental health conditions. (Please consult
>                         your doctor or pharmacist).
> 
>                    How to avoid heat related illness:
> 
>                       * Drink lots of water and natural juices even if
>                         you don't feel very thirsty. Avoid alcoholic
>                         beverages, coffee and cola.
>                       * Avoid going out in the blazing sun or heat when
>                         possible. If you must go outside, stay in the
>                         shade as much as possible and plan to go out
>                         early in the morning or evening when it is
>                         cooler and smog levels may not be as high as in
>                         the afternoon. Wear a hat.
>                       * Take advantage of air conditioned or cool places
>                         such as shopping malls, libraries, community
>                         centres or a friend's place.
>                       * If you don't have air conditioning, keep shades
>                         or drapes drawn and blinds closed on the sunny
>                         side of your home, but keep windows slightly
>                         open.
>                       * Keep electric lights off or turned down low.
>                       * Take a cool bath or shower periodically or cool
>                         down with cool, wet towels.
>                       * Wear loose fitting, light clothing.
>                       * Avoid heavy meals and using your oven.
>                       * Avoid intense or moderately intense physical
>                         activity.
>                       * Never leave a child in a parked car or sleeping
>                         outside in direct sunlight.
>                       * Fans alone may not provide enough cooling when
>                         the temperature is high.
>                       * Consult your doctor or pharmacist regarding side
>                         effects of your medications.
> 
>                    Get help from a friend, relative, or a doctor if you
>                    have the following symptoms of heat illness:
> 
>                       * Rapid breathing
>                       * Weakness or fainting
>                       * More tiredness than usual
>                       * Headache
>                       * Confusion
> 
>                    Friends and relatives can help someone with heat
>                    illness by doing the following:
> 
>                       * Call for help.
>                       * Remove excess clothing from the person.
>                       * Cool the person with lukewarm water, by sponging
>                         or bathing.
>                       * Move the person to a cooler location.
>                       * Give the person sips of cool water, not ice cold
>                         water.
> 
>                    If you become ill, faint, have difficulty breathing
>                    or feel confused and disoriented, call your doctor.
>                    In an emergency, call 911.
> 
>                    For more information on heat related illness, call
>                    the Toronto Public Health office nearest you:
> 
>                    East Region
> 
>                       * East York - (416) 397-4777
>                       * Scarborough (416) 396-4228
> 
>                    North Region
> 
>                       * North York (416) 395-7600
> 
>                    South Region
> 
>                       * Toronto (416) 392-7401
> 
>                    West Region
> 
>                       * Etobicoke (416) 394-8302
>                       * York (416) 394-2891
> 
>                    The development of this fact sheet has been a
>                    collaborative effort between Toronto Public Health,
>                    the Seniors Taskforce and the Community Health
>                    Network of West Toronto, Seniors Sub-group.
> 
>                    Mail Us at Health!
> 
>                    Back to public health home
> 
> 
> 
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