Forced outpatient drugging kills/heatstroke deaths

Graeme Bacque (gbacque@idirect.com)
Tue, 21 Jul 1998 00:46:07 -0700


---------forwarded message---------
Date: Sat, 18 Jul 1998 11:36:39 -0500
From: dweitz@interlog.com (Don Weitz)
Subject: Forced outpatient drugging kills/heatstroke deaths
X-Sender: dweitz@mail.interlog.com

[This news article published in Dendron (summer 1996,#37/38, p.9) re forced
drugging, heat stroke and death is extremely important and still timely.
I'm also forwarding this to Ontario Chief Coroner James Young, the Toronto
Board of Health, and Toronto's Public Health Department. Yesterday, at a
meeting of Metro Council's Advisory Committee on Homeless & Socially
Isolated Persons, I urged Dr.Gould, Toronto's Associate Medical Officer of
Health, to include the neuroleptics ("anti-psychotics") as a major risk in
future heat wave alerts. Many thanks to Dendron editor David Oaks for
reminding me of this news article.]

PLEASE COPY & SNOWBALL ASAP

FORCED OUTPATIENT DRUGGING KILLS!

     Consider the well-publicized heat wave deaths in the Summer of '95.
Member Jerry Egan sent Dendron the Chicago Tribune (7/22 & 7/16/95) in
which Medical Examiner Jeffrey Jentzen revealed that "in Milwaukee, 15 of
the 24 deaths due to heat stroke also involved psychiatric drugs. In other
words, the coroner attributed more than 60% of these deaths to psychiatric
drugs. According to the US Dept.of Health & Human Services, neuroleptics
are indeed a major culprit in heat wave deaths (DHHS MMWR; 6/30/95, p.467.)

     And heatstroke is just one way neuroleptics can kill, medical studies
indicate. There's choking from gag reflex suppression. Heart attacks.
Immune system dysfunction. Diabetes. A greater rate of breast cancer. And
other deadly hazards. Perhaps that's one reason a recent federally-funded
study completed by the Human Services Research Institute of Mass. found
that people labeled "Seriously Mentally Ill" had life spands 10 to 15 years
shorter than 'normals'".

     Dr.Frederick Zugibe, medical examiner of Rockland County in New York
State, is a hero in our movement for breaking the silence over these past
20 years about neuroleptic-related deaths. In a phone interview, he
recalled how his autopsy findings about frequent neuroleptic-related deaths
made the front page of the New York Times (7/17/78). Whistleblowing led to
harassment. "Colleagues even called me late at night saying I should
resign," said Zugibe, "but I stayed at my job, and later I won awards."
Little has changed he said, and he partly blames coroners for remaining so
silent.




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Graeme Bacque
<http://web.arcos.org/gbacque>
#14909975 on ICQ
*Question and challenge *all* human 'authority'*
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