Fw: Rural Update December

H. C. Covington (ach1@sprynet.com)
Sat, 20 Dec 1997 00:42:42 -0600


-----Original Message-----
From: Tim Walter <timothy@aspeninst.org>
Date: Friday, December 19, 1997 7:06 AM
Subject: Rural Update December


     ____                   _                    _       _
    / __ \ _   _ _ __  __ _| |  /\ /\  _ __   __| | __ _| |_  ___
   / /_/ /| | | | '__|/ _` | | / / \ \| '_ \ / _` |/ _` | __|/ _ \
  / __, / | |_| | |    (_| | | \ \_/ /| |_) | (_| | (_| | |_   __/
/_/  |_|  \__,_|_|   \__,_|_|  \___/ | .__/ \__,_|\__,_|\__|\___|
                                      |_|

==================================================================
THE RURAL UPDATE                                     December 1997
------------------------------------------------------------------
The Update addresses rural and small town community economic
development, with summaries and pointers to items on the Internet,
in major media, and in organizational newsletters and journals.
------------------------------------------------------------------
Aspen Institute Rural Economic Policy Program;  Tim Walter, Editor
Http://www.aspeninst.org/rural       E-mail: timothy@aspeninst.org
==================================================================


               DELIVERED BY E-MAIL ON DECEMBER 18, 1997
                 (Previous issue mailed September 5th)

CONTENTS:
  Tobacco Communities     Consulting and Job Opportunities
  In the News             Computer Grants
  Books and Reports       An Outhouse Chuckle
  Calendar Additions      Contact Info and Subscribing

The autumn season was extremely busy and exciting for us, with lots of
training, conferences and proposal reviewing, but that led to a publishing
hiatus.  Thanks to those who sent notes of encouragement, and we're now
actually ahead of the game with lots of material ready to go for the next
few
newsletters. Now it's time to "hit send" on the e-mail and head to the
party.
Happy holidays!  -TW-



---------------------  TOBACCO COMMUNITIES  ---------------------


ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT FUNDING POSSIBLE
Tobacco farmers and their home communities are fighting to include
community
economic development payments in the forthcoming billion-dollar federal
settlement with cigarette makers.  Farmers and health advocates have been
meeting under the auspices of several large initiatives to shape the
settlement which could happen in 1998.  Payments to farmers were omitted
from
the initial settlement released earlier this year.  Current legislative
proposals call for as much as $400 million per year to be block-granted to
tobacco growing states for economic diversification.  Community economic
development practitioners need to be prepared to help these farm and health
advocates present a strong case for wise investment in locally-led
development.

Also under consideration is a controversial provision to provide funds to
purchase and retire tobacco production quotas, thereby dismantling a market
system that is one of the only remaining examples of an industry-wide
cooperative agreement that enables farmers to make a living on a small plot
of
land.  This system has enabled thousands of small farmers to survive in
relation to a cigarette company oligopoly, with essentially only four
purchasers of the US tobacco crop. Though quotas would be retired and price
insurance ended, the provision would not outlaw the production of tobacco,
and
would likely lead to an increase in US production, upheaval for the farmers
and falling prices worldwide.  (Note: a common misconception is that the US
government finances tobacco price supports, but in reality this is a
cooperative program funded largely by the growers themselves and enforced
by
federal law.)

For more information, contact Frank Dukes, Southern Tobacco Communities
Project, Institute for Environmental Negotiation, 164 Rugby Rd, University
of
Virginia, Charlottesville, VA 22903; 804-924-2041, 0231 fax;
ed7k@virginia.edu.


-----------------------  IN THE NEWS  -----------------------


RURAL REBOUND IN TIME MAGAZINE
Time Magazine produced a nice series of articles highlighting the problems
and
opportunities of the US's two million-person rural rebound, "Why More
Americans Are Fleeing to Small Towns" (Dec. 8, 1997).  The articles address
towns' successful activities in stemming their decline (finally, an article
that just doesn't assume there's some magical demographic trend to move
rural!) and covers the tensions arising from newcomers and growth.  For
more
information on this topic, contact the National Trust for Historic
Preservation in Washington, DC, www.nthp.org, or check out "Communities in
the
Path of Development" by the Aspen Institute Rural Economic Policy Program,
$10, 202-736-5804.  The Time articles can be found on the web at:
www.pathfinder.com/time/magazine/1997/dom/971208/cover1.html


RURAL COMMUNITY COLLEGE
INITIATIVE UP AND RUNNING
The Ford Foundation's eight-year, $8 million Rural Community College
Initiative is designed to expand community colleges' role in aiding local
economies in distressed rural areas and increase educational opportunity
for
the rural poor. Recognizing that rural community colleges can be a catalyst
for economic development, the initiative encourages colleges to form
partnerships with local business, schools, government and community
organizations. Twenty-four colleges are now enrolled in the Ford
initiative.
Some of their projects: Southwest Texas Junior College now offers 37 new
continuing education courses, mostly in computer skills; Northern New
Mexico
Community College in Espanola has created a data base that will help local
artisans find new markets. See "Expanding Economic and Education
Opportunity
in Distressed Rural Areas," no charge; MDC, Inc., www.mdcinc.org, P.O. Box
17268, Chapel Hill, NC, 27514; tel.: 919-968-4531.


-----------------------  IN PRINT  -----------------------


"LINKING HUMAN SERVICES AND ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT"
In response to welfare restructuring, community-based groups must work
together to "turn human services programs into vehicles for job creation."
Prospects for work in home care, and child care, which are expected to
skyrocket, are examined in separate chapters. $15 + shipping, 84 pp., 1997;
Center for Community Change, 1000 Wisconsin Ave, Washington DC 20007,
202-342-0519.


"SUCCESSFUL COMMUNITY LEADERSHIP; A SKILLS GUIDE FOR VOLUNTEERS AND
PROFESSIONALS"
Manual of techniques to help community groups work cohesively and
effectively.
John Tropman, NASW Press, 1997, $25.95, # 2855; 1-800-227-3590; fax:
301-206-7989; web: www.naswpress.org.


"PLANNING FOR PROSPERITY: BUILDING
SUCCESSFUL COMMUNITIES IN THE SIERRA NEVADA"
The Sierra Nevada mountain range is an area of great scenic beauty, dotted
with historic towns -- and local business hopes to keep it that way. This
guidebook, sponsored by a business coalition, advocates town-based
development
as an alternative to rural sprawl, discusses ways to retain open land,
including farmland, and to integrate new development in historic areas.
Loaded
with case studies of Sierra Nevada successes. $20 (executive summary, $1),
1997, Sierra Business Council, PO Box 2428, Truckee, CA, 96160, Tel.: (916)
582-4800; fax: (916) 582-1230; info@sbcouncil.org.


"IMPROVING YOUR BUSINESS CLIMATE: A GUIDE TO SMARTER PUBLIC INVESTMENTS IN
ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT"
Rethinks the concept of "positive business climate," expanding beyond low
taxes to include an effectively-trained labor force, sound physical
infrastructure, and modernized business. Advocates that states work
together
to devise compacts to slow the recruitment "arms race." These are the same
folks who put out the influential "Development Report Card of the States."
William Schweke, 1997,  $25; Corporation for Enterprise Development, web:
www.cfed.org; 202-408-9788.


"TOURISM BUSINESS ENTREPRENEURIAL HANDBOOK"
Planning, financing, marketing, customer service, for tourism businesses
such
as restaurants, recreation, lodgings. Includes resource guide. Western
Entrepreneurial Network, Tel.: (800) 873-9378; fax: (303) 620-4670; e-mail:
rhorn@castle.cudenver.edu.


RURAL SCHOOL-TO-WORK GUIDE AVAILABLE
"Finding Their Own Place" offers three success stories that challenge the
belief that rural youth must forgo meaningful school-to-work experiences in
small towns.  Miller and Hahn, 114p, 1997; ERIC Clearinghouse on Rural
Education and Small Schools; $12; 800-624-9120.


"BALANCING NATURE AND COMMERCE
IN GATEWAY COMMUNITIES"
Many "gateway communities" adjacent to national parks and scenic areas are
experiencing explosive growth -- jeopardizing the quality of life there.
The
heart of the book is an 85 pp. chapter profiling numerous gateway success
stories. "We badly need the stories in this book to give us the tools and
the
hope." Howe, McMahon, Probst, The Conservation Fund and the Sonoran
Institute
$21.95, Island Press, 1997, www.islandpress.org; 800-828-1302.

-----------------------  IN PRINT, CONTINUED  -----------------------

                     FICTION, HISTORY, and the
                   UP-AND-COMING DAIRY QUEEN GENRE


"ALL OVER BUT THE SHOUTIN' "
Pulitzer prize-winning New York Times reporter Rick Bragg's account of
growing
up poor in the Alabama hills. "A great book; a poem disguised as a memoir;
a
gift from a son to his mother; a primer on reporting." 1997 Pantheon Books,
$25.


"BIG TROUBLE: A MURDER IN A SMALL WESTERN TOWN
SETS OF A STRUGGLE FOR THE SOUL OF AMERICA"
When Idaho mine owners decided, in 1892, to reduce worker's wages from
$3.50
to $3.00 a day, federal troops were called in to put down ensuing strikes.
Further repercussions included mine equipment explosions and the murder of
a
former governor. The final book by the late Pulitzer prize-winning
journalist
captures "that moment in our national experience when we came closest to
class
warfare."  by J. Anthony Lukas, 1997, Simon & Shuster, $32.


"RISING TIDE: THE GREAT MISSISSIPPI FLOOD OF
1927 AND HOW IT CHANGED AMERICA"
"Riveting account of the nation's most destructive natural disaster, which
changed history, helped make a president (Herbert Hoover) and, the author
contends, led directly to black migration from the South. 'Sweeps the
reader
along like the Mississippi itself.'" 1997, Simon & Shuster, $27.50.


"DAIRY QUEEN DAYS: A NOVEL"
With his mother hospitalized for depression, his preacher father
scandalizing
his congregation by comparing Jesus and Elvis, 16-year-old Trout Moseley is
packed off to the small town that bears his family name. "Sweet, sad humor,
but an overloaded story." by Robert Inman, $21.95, Little Brown & Co., 1997


"CHEVROLET SUMMERS, DAIRY QUEEN NIGHTS; OF CLOUDLESS AND CAREFREE AMERICAN
DAYS"
Essays by Chicago Tribune columnist Bob Greene. "With datelines from such
precincts as Rensselaer, ID, Ebensberg, PA, and Bexley, OH...Sentimental,
entertaining variety pack of American life." $24.95, Viking Press, 1997


"THE DEER MOUSE"
"Immensely powerful first novel" set on a cattle ranch in 1980 Wyoming.
"...refuses to sugarcoat the tough life of a cowboy, yet celebrates the
fact
that life continues when we let someone go..." by Ken Grant, $24, Permanent
Press, 1997


"HEAT LIGHTNING"
Orphaned, small-town pre-teen tries to deal with her parents' death, while
her
sister explores first love with a summer tourist. First novel "stuns with
its
lean, unadorned artistry." Leah Hager Cohen, $22, Avon Books, 1997


-----------------------  CALENDAR ADDITIONS  -----------------------


SOUTHERN PLAINS CONFERENCE
(These folks present a wonderful integration of agriculture, theology, and
inclusive community empowerment; an unpretentious, comfortable gathering.
-TW-)
Jan 10, 1998; Amarillo, TX
Promised Land Network; Lydia Villanueva, PO Box 1844, Hereford TX
79045-1844;
806-364-4445; pln1@wtrt.net


HIGH PERFORMANCE DEVELOPMENT IN THE NEW ECONOMY
A Seminar on Building Competitive and Livable Communities
January 22-23, and 26-27, 1998; Denver, CO
(This is the "lone eagle" high tech entrepreneur think tank.)
Lys Damato, Center for the New West, www.newwest.org; 303-572-5400


INTERNATIONAL TRAIL AND GREENWAYS CONFERENCE
Creating integrated trail networks from former rail corridors and other
open
space.
January 28-31, 1998; San Diego, CA
Rails-to-Trails Conservancy
Andy Clark, 202/331-9696, rtcandy@transact.org, www.railtrails.org


COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT FINANCIAL INSTITUTIONS CONFERENCE
CDFI Institute: The Role of CDFI's in the Community Development
(Previous gatherings of this group convened some of the best organizations
in
development finance; good networking opportunity for those interested in
the
field.)
Jan 29-31, 1998; Washington, DC
CDFI Coalition, 215-923-5363; www.cdfi.org


NEIGHBORHOOD REINVESTMENT TRAINING INSTITUTE
Feb 9-13, 1998; Atlanta, GA
(Note, not specifically rural, but some good general development practice.)
Lucy Rosario, Neighborhood Reinvestment Corp., 800-438-5547; www.nw.org


RURAL HEALTH POLICY INSTITUTE
Feb 9-11, 1998; Washington, DC
National Rural Health Association, 1 W. Armour Blvd, Suite 301, Kansas
City,
MO 64111;  www.nrharural.org


TELECOMMUNICATIONS LINKS IN LOW
INCOME AND RURAL COMMUNITIES
"Connecting All Americans For The 21st Century"
Includes training session on community networking
Feb 24-27, 1998; Washington, DC
US Dept of Commerce and Public Utility Law Project
Trudi Renwick, www.pulpny.org/CAM;  info@pulpny.org; 800-255-7857, x16;
(Note: The organizers intend to offer aid for some the expenses of some
low-income attendees; contact Trudi directly at tjrenwick@pulpny.org.)


AVOIDING THE DIGITAL POTHOLES: EMPOWERING PEOPLE TO MAKE CHOICES
Alliance for Public Technology Eighth Annual Conference
Feb 25-28, 1998; Washington, DC
APT, 202-408-1403, 1134 fax, 901 15th St NW, Suite 230, Washington DC
20005,
apt@apt.org


CONSORTIUM FOR SCHOOL NETWORKING
K-12 Networking Third Annual Conference
Feb 26-28, 1998; Washington, DC
COSN, 1555 Connecticut Ave NW #200, Washington DC 20036-1126; 202-462-9043,
202-466-6296 fax, www.cosn.org.


SUSTAINABLE COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT STRATEGIES: THE ECONOMIC RENEWAL PROCESS
(One of the best organizations weaving environmental issues, economic
development and community processes.  Good materials up on the Web.)
Mar 25-29, 1998; Glenwood Springs, CO
Amy Seif, Rocky Mountain Institute, 970-927-3807, aseif@rmi.org,
www.rmi.org


THE 1998 RURAL WATER RALLY
Apr. 19-21; Arlington, VA
National Rural Water Association, www.nrwa.org; (405) 252-0629


MICROENTERPRISE CONFERENCE
Association for Enterprise Opportunity Annual Training Conference
April 22-25, 1998; Washington DC
AEO, 312-357-0177, www.wwa.com/~aeo


NATIONAL ASSOCIATION OF DEVELOPMENT ORGANIZATIONS WASHINGTON POLICY
CONFERENCE
"Building Rural Policies From The Ground Up"
Apr. 26-28, 1998 Washington, D.C.
NADO, 202-624-7806, nado@sso.org; www.nado.org


-----------------------  HELP WANTED  -----------------------
                    CONSULTANTS AND STAFF


ACCESS TO MARKETS DEVELOPER
ASSOCIATION FOR ENTERPRISE OPPORTUNITY
A new position is available to help build marketing campaigns and
collaborative networks to support microentrepreneurs.  Contact Michelle
Nolan,
AEO, 70 E. Lake St., Chicago, IL 60601; fax 312-357-0180.  (Initial
deadline
was Dec. 21, 1997, but this was advertised late in their newsletter.)


MANAGER, ENTREPRENEURIAL DEVELOPMENT
APPALACHIAN REGIONAL COMMISSION
ARC needs a director for its "Building Entrepreneurial Economies In
Appalachia," a $15 million initiative to foster entrepreneurship in the
region.  This is a high-level, high-visibility assignment; a masters or
Ph.D.
plus five years' experience is required.  Contact the ARC personnel office
for
a complete description; 202-884-7712 or 7714 and the necessary forms.
Deadline is December 30, 1997.


PROGRAM OFFICER, EAGLE STAFF FUND,
FIRST NATIONS DEVELOPMENT INSTITUTE
An interesting initiative, the ESF builds the capacity of organizations
involved in culturally appropriate development in Indian Country.  This is
a
senior position, contact the Eagle Staff Fund at FNDI for a complete
description; originally announced Oct 15th. but still reviewing resumes.
11917 Main St, Fredericksburg VA 22408; 540-371-3505 fax.


KELLOGG FOUNDATION
The Kellogg Foundation's "Managing Information with Rural America" is
screening  trainers for community teams in the topics of "change," asset
mapping, human and electronic networks, rural policy, participatory
decision
making, project planning, evaluation, funding, coalition building,
technology
as a tool for community economic development, conflict management, group
process, managing technology in a community project, and recruiting and
motivating.  Trainers are paid $1,500 per session plus travel.  Please send
nominee names and contact information by December 22, 1997 to Vicki Luther,
Heartland Center for Leadership Development, 941 "O" St, #920, Lincoln NE
68508; fax 402-474-7672.


CREDIT UNION TRAINING INSTITUTE
The National Federation of Community Development Credit Unions is seeking
organizational development consultants and partners for a major training
initiative in program development and management.  Contact them at
212-809-1850 tel, 3274 fax.


-----------------------  FUNDING  -----------------------


COMPUTER SYSTEMS FOR ENVIRONMENTAL GROUPS
The Conservation Technology Support Program provides grants and training to
nonprofit organizations involved in environmental issues.  Letters of
intent
are due January 2, 1998, for organizations interested in upgrading their
geographic information systems. Visit the web site at www.desktop.org/ctsp
or
send an e-mail message to ctsp@lists.desktop.org; the 1998 CTSP guidelines
will be automatically returned to you by e-mail.  CTSP, Janet Seymour, 324
Fuller Ave, Suite C2, Helena MT 59601-6228.



-----------------------  CHUCKLE  -----------------------


JUST STEPPIN' OUT BACK A MOMENT
We used to count outhouses as one of the indicators of rural poverty in my
home state of North Carolina, so imagine my surprise to discover the
newsletter of the "Outhouse Preservation Society,"  filled with poetry,
photographs, cartoons, Martha Stewart-style decorating ideas, and book ads.
For only $10 you can enroll yourself (or a loved one) as a lifetime member
of
the society and receive a certificate suitable for framing (or recycling).
Newsletters are $4 per issue, $12/yr.  The puns alone are worth it.
Contact
Sherman Hines, PO Box 25067; Halifax NS, B3M 4H4, Canada.


----------------  CONTACT INFO & SUBSCRIBING  ----------------


The Update is delivered free by E-mail.  If you don't have e-mail, please
find
a friend to take delivery for you.  To subscribe, send a message using the
following format:

  TO: ruralupdate@lists.aspeninst.org
  SUBJECT FIELD: subscribe
  BODY: Your name, organization, mailing address, phone & fax
        and WWW site (if you have one).

You are encouraged to photocopy the Update and distribute it around your
office.  However, if you wish to broadcast the Update electronically on a
regular basis please contact us first for permission.  Copyright 1997 by
the
Aspen Institute.

Recent back issues are on the Web at http://www.aspeninst.org/rural. Prior
years' archives are posted on HandsNet at www.handsnet.org/handsnet.

Timothy R. Walter
The Aspen Institute Rural Economic Policy Program
1333 New Hampshire Ave. NW #1070
Washington, DC 20036-1511 USA
tel: 202-736-5834   fax: 202-467-0790
E-mail: timothy@aspeninst.org
Web: http://www.aspeninst.org/rural
--------------------------------------------------------------

H. C. Sonny Covington @ I CAN! America
Lafayette -  New Iberia, LA  70563-1722
(318) 364-6239  Fax 318-367-9141