[Hpn] Pins can help make point for nonprofits

William C. Tinker wtinker@verizon.net
Sat, 15 Mar 2008 08:09:15 -0400


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http://www.bradenton.com/lwrherald/story/467972.html

Saturday, March 15, 2008

Pins can help make point for nonprofits
By TIFFANY ST. MARTIN
tstmartin@bradenton.com=20



LAKEWOOD RANCH --
Lucinda Yates went from being a homeless woman who slept under bridges =
and stood in line at soup kitchens to one whose company has helped =
nonprofit organizations raise more than $25 million.=20

And it all started with a piece of jewelry, a pin.

Yates, of Maine, told her story before a packed house at the Lakewood =
Ranch Golf and Country Club on Friday at Pins with a Purpose, a luncheon =
celebrating women's philanthropy.

The sold-out event was meant to increase awareness of nonprofits and the =
good they do, said Mary Ellen Motyl, program coordinator of the Lakewood =
Ranch Community Fund.

The Lakewood Ranch Community Fund works closely with the Manatee =
Community Foundation and the Community Foundation of Sarasota County. =
All three organizations sponsored the luncheon.

Everyone hears about big nonprofits like the American Cancer Society, =
Motyl said, but there are many more organizations out there - big and =
small.

There are 1,899 nonprofits - excluding religious organizations - in =
Manatee and Sarasota counties, said Michael Saunders, who gave Yates' =
introduction.

Yates led a "Leave It to Beaver" life until her father died of a massive =
heart attack when she was 16, leaving her mother to take care of three =
daughters, one of them in a wheelchair because of cerebral palsy.

She took off with her boyfriend, became pregnant and got married. "It =
went down the tubes as fast as it started," Yates said.

Long story short, she ended up homeless with no resources and had to =
send her daughter to live with her daughter's father. Yates thought =
things couldn't get any worse, but they did when she was raped at =
gunpoint.

She made her way back home and started selling art-deco jewelry at craft =
shows and boutiques.

Then one day she was making pins and put a triangle on top of a square, =
and "lo and behold, it was a house." The House Pins (today they're =
trademarked) were a fundraiser for the homeless; they made money and =
created awareness of the issue, Yates said.

After a real estate agent took 100 of the pins to sell at a convention, =
Yates started getting calls from people all over the country who wanted =
pins for all sorts of causes.

That was 20 years and 4 million pins ago.

"Lucinda has a pin for every purpose, and we have a fund for every =
purpose," said Jocelyn Stevens, donor services officer with the =
Community Foundation of Sarasota County.

Stevens wore a ribbon-shaped pin for ovarian cancer, one of 16 causes =
represented by the pieces. Others were for everything from education to =
theater and animal welfare, and everyone at the luncheon chose one to =
take home.

Some made their decisions based on a pin's design, but Barbara Held =
chose a pin in support of the environment because "I'm a huge fan of the =
outdoors, parks and recreation. We need more of it."

That's not all Held took from the luncheon.

Every story has a takeaway, Yates said, and hers is the Realtor. Without =
the real estate agent who launched Designs by Lucinda, Yates wouldn't be =
where she is today.

"We're all just one choice away from changing the world," she said. =
"Every one of us."


Tiffany St. Martin, Herald reporter, can be reached at 708-7918.











New Hampshire Homeless
Founded 11-28-99
25 Granite Street
Northfield,N.H. 03276-1640 USA
Advocates,activists for disabled,displaced human rights.
1-603-286-2492
http://www.missingkids.com
http://www.nationalhomeless.org
http://www.newhampshirehomeless.org
newhampshirehomeless-subscribe@topica.com

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<DIV><FONT face=3DArial size=3D2><A=20
href=3D"http://www.bradenton.com/lwrherald/story/467972.html">http://www.=
bradenton.com/lwrherald/story/467972.html</A></FONT></DIV>
<DIV>&nbsp;</DIV>
<DIV>Saturday, March 15, 2008
<DIV class=3DstoryTools><FONT face=3DArial size=3D2></FONT>&nbsp;</DIV>
<DIV id=3DstoryBody>
<H1>Pins can help make point for nonprofits</H1>
<H4 class=3Dbyline>By TIFFANY ST. MARTIN</H4>
<H5 class=3Dstory_credit><A =
href=3D"mailto:tstmartin@bradenton.com"><FONT=20
color=3D#003399>tstmartin@bradenton.com</FONT></A> </H5><BR>
<P>
<H3 class=3Ddateline>LAKEWOOD RANCH --</H3>Lucinda Yates went from being =
a=20
homeless woman who slept under bridges and stood in line at soup =
kitchens to one=20
whose company has helped nonprofit organizations raise more than $25 =
million.=20
<P></P>
<P>And it all started with a piece of jewelry, a pin.</P>
<P>Yates, of Maine, told her story before a packed house at the Lakewood =
Ranch=20
Golf and Country Club on Friday at Pins with a Purpose, a luncheon =
celebrating=20
women's philanthropy.</P>
<P>The sold-out event was meant to increase awareness of nonprofits and =
the good=20
they do, said Mary Ellen Motyl, program coordinator of the Lakewood =
Ranch=20
Community Fund.</P>
<P>The Lakewood Ranch Community Fund works closely with the Manatee =
Community=20
Foundation and the Community Foundation of Sarasota County. All three=20
organizations sponsored the luncheon.</P>
<P>Everyone hears about big nonprofits like the American Cancer Society, =
Motyl=20
said, but there are many more organizations out there - big and =
small.</P>
<P>There are 1,899 nonprofits - excluding religious organizations - in =
Manatee=20
and Sarasota counties, said Michael Saunders, who gave Yates' =
introduction.</P>
<P>Yates led a "Leave It to Beaver" life until her father died of a =
massive=20
heart attack when she was 16, leaving her mother to take care of three=20
daughters, one of them in a wheelchair because of cerebral palsy.</P>
<P>She took off with her boyfriend, became pregnant and got married. "It =
went=20
down the tubes as fast as it started," Yates said.</P>
<P>Long story short, she ended up homeless with no resources and had to =
send her=20
daughter to live with her daughter's father. Yates thought things =
couldn't get=20
any worse, but they did when she was raped at gunpoint.</P>
<P>She made her way back home and started selling art-deco jewelry at =
craft=20
shows and boutiques.</P>
<P>Then one day she was making pins and put a triangle on top of a =
square, and=20
"lo and behold, it was a house." The House Pins (today they're =
trademarked) were=20
a fundraiser for the homeless; they made money and created awareness of =
the=20
issue, Yates said.</P>
<P>After a real estate agent took 100 of the pins to sell at a =
convention, Yates=20
started getting calls from people all over the country who wanted pins =
for all=20
sorts of causes.</P>
<P>That was 20 years and 4 million pins ago.</P>
<P>"Lucinda has a pin for every purpose, and we have a fund for every =
purpose,"=20
said Jocelyn Stevens, donor services officer with the Community =
Foundation of=20
Sarasota County.</P>
<P>Stevens wore a ribbon-shaped pin for ovarian cancer, one of 16 causes =

represented by the pieces. Others were for everything from education to =
theater=20
and animal welfare, and everyone at the luncheon chose one to take =
home.</P>
<P>Some made their decisions based on a pin's design, but Barbara Held =
chose a=20
pin in support of the environment because "I'm a huge fan of the =
outdoors, parks=20
and recreation. We need more of it."</P>
<P>That's not all Held took from the luncheon.</P>
<P>Every story has a takeaway, Yates said, and hers is the Realtor. =
Without the=20
real estate agent who launched Designs by Lucinda, Yates wouldn't be =
where she=20
is today.</P>
<P>"We're all just one choice away from changing the world," she said. =
"Every=20
one of us."</P><!-- Begin This might need formating -->
<P style=3D"TEXT-ALIGN: center"></P><!-- END This might need formating =
-->
<H2 class=3Dshirttail>Tiffany St. Martin, Herald reporter, can be =
reached at=20
708-7918.</H2>
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<DIV class=3Dshirttail><FONT face=3DArial size=3D2></FONT>&nbsp;</DIV>
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<DIV class=3Dshirttail><FONT face=3DArial size=3D2></FONT>&nbsp;</DIV>
<DIV class=3Dshirttail><FONT face=3DArial size=3D2></FONT>&nbsp;</DIV>
<DIV class=3Dshirttail><FONT face=3DArial size=3D2></FONT>&nbsp;</DIV>
<DIV class=3Dshirttail><FONT face=3DArial size=3D2></FONT>&nbsp;</DIV>
<DIV class=3Dshirttail><FONT face=3DArial size=3D2></FONT>&nbsp;</DIV>
<DIV class=3Dshirttail><FONT face=3DArial size=3D2></FONT>&nbsp;</DIV>
<DIV class=3Dshirttail><FONT face=3DArial =
size=3D2></FONT>&nbsp;</DIV></DIV></DIV>
<DIV><FONT face=3DArial size=3D2><BR>New Hampshire Homeless<BR>Founded=20
11-28-99<BR>25 Granite Street<BR>Northfield,N.H. 03276-1640=20
USA<BR>Advocates,activists for disabled,displaced human=20
rights.<BR>1-603-286-2492<BR><A=20
href=3D"http://www.missingkids.com">http://www.missingkids.com</A><BR><A =

href=3D"http://www.nationalhomeless.org">http://www.nationalhomeless.org<=
/A><BR><A=20
href=3D"http://www.newhampshirehomeless.org">http://www.newhampshirehomel=
ess.org</A><BR><A=20
href=3D"mailto:newhampshirehomeless-subscribe@topica.com">newhampshirehom=
eless-subscribe@topica.com</A><BR></FONT></DIV></BODY></HTML>

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