[Hpn] Poverty's human face

William C. Tinker wtinker@verizon.net
Wed, 09 Jan 2008 06:21:50 -0500


This is a multi-part message in MIME format.

------=_NextPart_000_00E8_01C85287.EB5296A0
Content-Type: text/plain;
	charset="iso-8859-1"
Content-Transfer-Encoding: quoted-printable

http://www.detnews.com:80/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=3D/20080109/LIFESTYLE=
/801090395

Wednesday, January 9, 2008=20
Poverty's human face
Susan Whitall / The Detroit News
As pastor of the Capuchin Soup Kitchen, Brother Vincent Reyes was used =
to numbers. When he gave talks in the community about the work of the =
Capuchins feeding the hungry, he had a slew of statistics at hand to =
impress people.=20

"Well over 3.5 million pounds of food are given to families every year =
(by the Capuchins)," Reyes says. "That's besides the 55,000 meals we =
serve every month. But what I began to see was, the numbers were so =
impressive, you forget that every number is a person.=20

"The folks that we work with, people don't notice them. Very seldom do =
they leave a footprint, so I wanted to honor who they were."=20



Reyes drew upon a background in photojournalism and relationships with =
newspaper photographers in Detroit to put together a photo book, "My =
Name Is Portraits and Table Stories From the Capuchin Soup Kitchen" =
(Wayne State University Press, $25). The Capuchin monk has been posted =
in Detroit on and off for some years; he's also worked as an =
emergency-room chaplain in Chicago, and was posted in South America for =
a time.=20

Currently, he is in charge of development for the Capuchins in Detroit.=20

Two and half years ago, the friar teamed up with Detroit News =
photographers Steve Perez and Elizabeth Conley, as well as Free Press =
shooters Chip Somodevilla and Ed Haun, to photograph some of the =
visitors to the Capuchin's two Detroit soup kitchens: one on the corner =
of St. Paul and Meldrum streets, behind the monastery, and the other on =
Conner Street between Mack and Warren avenues.=20

In a follow-up meeting, Reyes would interview the subjects, those who =
came back to the soup kitchen, that is. Each person's story was told in =
his or her own words.=20

There is Anthony Edwards "Pops" Davis of Detroit, who will turn 60 in =
February. Davis is a Wayne State graduate whose life was blighted by =
drugs. He knows that he has dementia.=20

"That's why I'm blessed: I'm sitting with the Capuchins," Davis says in =
his essay. "There's nothing that God can't do. I might even live longer =
than expected. Maybe I got five or six years according to medical =
science, but maybe not. Science cannot put a sentence on me. The reason =
you are hearing my voice right now is that the Fathers took a liking to =
me. I'm so proud to sit here, to see my picture, to give my testimony."=20

Reyes felt that many of his subjects blossomed when the camera was =
focused on them, exuding a spirituality and attractiveness that belied =
their daily struggle. Alfredia Odom, 34, of Detroit, who "got into =
things in the street," looks serene and glowing in her photo.=20

"I didn't want to capture how beat up by life she was. I wanted to =
capture how beautiful she was," Reyes says.=20

For her part, speaking on the phone Tuesday during a visit to the =
Capuchins, Odom said of her portrait: "Oh it's real bold. I like it, =
though."=20

In the book, Odom talks about how the excitement of the streets turned =
hollow. "If I could do it all over again, I would stay in school," she =
said in her essay. "I'm most thankful for still living and having my =
mind I was on the verge of losing them both."=20

"The program here is a beautiful program," Odom said by phone of the =
Capuchins. "They take care of the needy."=20

Her parting words: "Just take what I wrote in that book to heart," Odom =
said.=20

Detroit News photographer Perez met Brother Reyes when the monk asked =
the journalist to donate some photos for a Capuchin auction. He's since =
worked on several projects with him.=20

"The easy part (of the book) was taking their photos," Perez says. "The =
toughest thing was just finding these guys (for the interviews). We shot =
most of these photos in a 2- to-3-month period back in 2004 to 2005. =
Then we tried to find them so we could get them in the book. We shot =
well over 125 people, but what made it into the book were only the =
people we could find."=20

Of his photos, Perez' favorite is the one he shot of a couple, Marge and =
John. John worked for 17 years as a die caster, and they owned three =
cars, a house and a camper, but they fell into debt, then bankruptcy, =
then lost their home. Marge, who was born in Grosse Pointe, had no =
family, "no one to turn to anymore."=20

"I shot a series of photos of them, and you could tell they were so much =
in love, even though they didn't have anything. Marge died (of =
pneumonia) last year, from what Brother Vince told me. It was kind of =
bad, hearing that," Perez says.=20

When the photos were developed, Reyes gave a copy to each person or =
family, if and when they came through the soup kitchen again. Davis =
happened by on a day that his photo had been put up on a wall.=20

"Pops walks in and sees it; he stops and says, 'That's me'," Reyes says. =
"He was just enthralled by it. 'Can I show them?' he said, pointing to =
the dining room. I said 'Yeah, let's go out.' He's showing people his =
picture, but he won't let them touch it. 'No! Dirty hands.' He gives me =
the picture back, and says 'Now, I won't be forgotten.'"=20

Debra=20

"I was born in Grosse Pointe Farms I had a really painful childhood. I =
was in a foster home, me and my brother. They used to beat on us and =
they did a whole lot of stuff to us I used to be a track runner when I =
was a kid. That's what my dream was. I was pretty good. I won at State =
and everything, but my brother messed my leg up I'm thankful that I wake =
up every morning and start a new, fresh day, every day Don't look at a =
poor person like they're a bad person. Some people do better than =
others. Nobody wants to be poor."=20

Alfredia=20

"My favorite memory would probably be in school when I was racing. I did =
track and field. I used to like to run a lot I started hanging out, =
became homeless, stopped going to school, and stopped even wanting to go =
to school my priorities ended up being the streets and survival you =
can't beat the streets. They'll beat you every time."=20

Willie Pearl=20

"I was born in Jones County, Georgia. I was born in 1932, the sixth born =
of 11. I came to Detroit with my mother and daddy when I was 12 being =
together was the best part of growing up. I never had a job except to =
take care of the house and two boys. I don't have any disappointments =
I'm already in heaven. I was born in heaven. When I die I want to go =
home to my God."=20

Marge & John=20

"We weren't always homeless. We used to have three cars, a house and a =
camper. I got a skilled trade, but I just can't get a job now. I ain't =
got any I.D. or address. I got 17 years experience as a die caster We've =
been on the streets for three years now, sleeping in the snow and =
everything this isn't really us. We're really good people, strong, hard =
workers."=20

Kimitris=20

"I remember coming to the Soup Kitchen as a young child and the =
Christmases that we were able to pick out our own gifts ... my mother =
knew how to survive. She knew how to do outreach for her children. If =
her children were in need, she knew the places to go ... My mom died =
when I was 12 years old. My mother overdosed from drugs."=20

Marcel=20

"My grandmother would just wash the pants every day and iron a clean =
shirt and I was happy. Kids these days want $100 gym shoes and designer =
jeans ... It's a dog-eat-dog world out there. I got mine and you get =
yours, but if you get too much more than me, then I'm going to take =
yours ... we're so prone to hate one another for no reason at all."=20

You can reach Susan Whitall at (313) 222-2156 or  swhitall@detnews.com.=20












William Charles Tinker=20
New Hampshire Homeless=20
Founded 11-28-99
25 Granite Street=20
Northfield,N.H. 03276-1640 USA=20
Advocates,activists for disabled,displaced human rights.=20
1-603-286-2492=20
http://www.missingkids.com=20
http://www.nationalhomeless.org=20
http://www.newhampshirehomeless.org=20
http://www.newhampshirehomeless-subscribe@topica.com 
------=_NextPart_000_00E8_01C85287.EB5296A0
Content-Type: text/html;
	charset="iso-8859-1"
Content-Transfer-Encoding: quoted-printable

<!DOCTYPE HTML PUBLIC "-//W3C//DTD HTML 4.0 Transitional//EN">
<HTML><HEAD>
<META http-equiv=3DContent-Type content=3D"text/html; =
charset=3Diso-8859-1">
<META content=3D"MSHTML 6.00.6000.16587" name=3DGENERATOR>
<STYLE></STYLE>
</HEAD>
<BODY bgColor=3D#ffffff>
<DIV>
<DIV class=3D"block block4"><SPAN class=3DtimeStamp><FONT face=3DArial =
size=3D2><A=20
href=3D"http://www.detnews.com:80/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=3D/20080109/L=
IFESTYLE/801090395">http://www.detnews.com:80/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=3D=
/20080109/LIFESTYLE/801090395</A></FONT></SPAN></DIV>
<DIV class=3D"block block4"><SPAN class=3DtimeStamp></SPAN>&nbsp;</DIV>
<DIV class=3D"block block4"><SPAN class=3DtimeStamp>Wednesday, January =
9,=20
2008</SPAN> </DIV>
<H1>Poverty's human face</H1>
<H4>Susan Whitall / The Detroit News</H4>
<P>As pastor of the Capuchin Soup Kitchen, Brother Vincent Reyes was =
used to=20
numbers. When he gave talks in the community about the work of the =
Capuchins=20
feeding the hungry, he had a slew of statistics at hand to impress =
people. </P>
<P>"Well over 3.5 million pounds of food are given to families every =
year (by=20
the Capuchins)," Reyes says. "That's besides the 55,000 meals we serve =
every=20
month. But what I began to see was, the numbers were so impressive, you =
forget=20
that every number is a person. </P>
<P>"The folks that we work with, people don't notice them. Very seldom =
do they=20
leave a footprint, so I wanted to honor who they were." </P>
<P>&nbsp;</P>
<P>Reyes drew upon a background in photojournalism and relationships =
with=20
newspaper photographers in Detroit to put together a photo book, "My =
Name Is=20
Portraits and Table Stories From the Capuchin Soup Kitchen" (Wayne State =

University Press, $25). The Capuchin monk has been posted in Detroit on =
and off=20
for some years; he's also worked as an emergency-room chaplain in =
Chicago, and=20
was posted in South America for a time. </P>
<P>Currently, he is in charge of development for the Capuchins in =
Detroit. </P>
<P>Two and half years ago, the friar teamed up with Detroit News =
photographers=20
Steve Perez and Elizabeth Conley, as well as Free Press shooters Chip=20
Somodevilla and Ed Haun, to photograph some of the visitors to the =
Capuchin's=20
two Detroit soup kitchens: one on the corner of St. Paul and Meldrum =
streets,=20
behind the monastery, and the other on Conner Street between Mack and =
Warren=20
avenues. </P>
<P>In a follow-up meeting, Reyes would interview the subjects, those who =
came=20
back to the soup kitchen, that is. Each person's story was told in his =
or her=20
own words. </P>
<P>There is Anthony Edwards "Pops" Davis of Detroit, who will turn 60 in =

February. Davis is a Wayne State graduate whose life was blighted by =
drugs. He=20
knows that he has dementia. </P>
<P>"That's why I'm blessed: I'm sitting with the Capuchins," Davis says =
in his=20
essay. "There's nothing that God can't do. I might even live longer than =

expected. Maybe I got five or six years according to medical science, =
but maybe=20
not. Science cannot put a sentence on me. The reason you are hearing my =
voice=20
right now is that the Fathers took a liking to me. I'm so proud to sit =
here, to=20
see my picture, to give my testimony." </P>
<P>Reyes felt that many of his subjects blossomed when the camera was =
focused on=20
them, exuding a spirituality and attractiveness that belied their daily=20
struggle. Alfredia Odom, 34, of Detroit, who "got into things in the =
street,"=20
looks serene and glowing in her photo. </P>
<P>"I didn't want to capture how beat up by life she was. I wanted to =
capture=20
how beautiful she was," Reyes says. </P>
<P>For her part, speaking on the phone Tuesday during a visit to the =
Capuchins,=20
Odom said of her portrait: "Oh it's real bold. I like it, though." </P>
<P>In the book, Odom talks about how the excitement of the streets =
turned=20
hollow. "If I could do it all over again, I would stay in school," she =
said in=20
her essay. "I'm most thankful for still living and having my mind I was =
on the=20
verge of losing them both." </P>
<P>"The program here is a beautiful program," Odom said by phone of the=20
Capuchins. "They take care of the needy." </P>
<P>Her parting words: "Just take what I wrote in that book to heart," =
Odom said.=20
</P>
<P>Detroit News photographer Perez met Brother Reyes when the monk asked =
the=20
journalist to donate some photos for a Capuchin auction. He's since =
worked on=20
several projects with him. </P>
<P>"The easy part (of the book) was taking their photos," Perez says. =
"The=20
toughest thing was just finding these guys (for the interviews). We shot =
most of=20
these photos in a 2- to-3-month period back in 2004 to 2005. Then we =
tried to=20
find them so we could get them in the book. We shot well over 125 =
people, but=20
what made it into the book were only the people we could find." </P>
<P>Of his photos, Perez' favorite is the one he shot of a couple, Marge =
and=20
John. John worked for 17 years as a die caster, and they owned three =
cars, a=20
house and a camper, but they fell into debt, then bankruptcy, then lost =
their=20
home. Marge, who was born in Grosse Pointe, had no family, "no one to =
turn to=20
anymore." </P>
<P>"I shot a series of photos of them, and you could tell they were so =
much in=20
love, even though they didn't have anything. Marge died (of pneumonia) =
last=20
year, from what Brother Vince told me. It was kind of bad, hearing =
that," Perez=20
says. </P>
<P>When the photos were developed, Reyes gave a copy to each person or =
family,=20
if and when they came through the soup kitchen again. Davis happened by =
on a day=20
that his photo had been put up on a wall. </P>
<P>"Pops walks in and sees it; he stops and says, 'That's me'," Reyes =
says. "He=20
was just enthralled by it. 'Can I show them?' he said, pointing to the =
dining=20
room. I said 'Yeah, let's go out.' He's showing people his picture, but =
he won't=20
let them touch it. 'No! Dirty hands.' He gives me the picture back, and =
says=20
'Now, I won't be forgotten.'" </P>
<P><B>Debra</B> </P>
<P>"I was born in Grosse Pointe Farms I had a really painful childhood. =
I was in=20
a foster home, me and my brother. They used to beat on us and they did a =
whole=20
lot of stuff to us I used to be a track runner when I was a kid. That's =
what my=20
dream was. I was pretty good. I won at State and everything, but my =
brother=20
messed my leg up I'm thankful that I wake up every morning and start a =
new,=20
fresh day, every day Don't look at a poor person like they're a bad =
person. Some=20
people do better than others. Nobody wants to be poor." </P>
<P><B>Alfredia</B> </P>
<P>"My favorite memory would probably be in school when I was racing. I =
did=20
track and field. I used to like to run a lot I started hanging out, =
became=20
homeless, stopped going to school, and stopped even wanting to go to =
school my=20
priorities ended up being the streets and survival you can't beat the =
streets.=20
They'll beat you every time." </P>
<P><B>Willie Pearl</B> </P>
<P>"I was born in Jones County, Georgia. I was born in 1932, the sixth =
born of=20
11. I came to Detroit with my mother and daddy when I was 12 being =
together was=20
the best part of growing up. I never had a job except to take care of =
the house=20
and two boys. I don't have any disappointments I'm already in heaven. I =
was born=20
in heaven. When I die I want to go home to my God." </P>
<P><B>Marge &amp; John</B> </P>
<P>"We weren't always homeless. We used to have three cars, a house and =
a=20
camper. I got a skilled trade, but I just can't get a job now. I ain't =
got any=20
I.D. or address. I got 17 years experience as a die caster We've been on =
the=20
streets for three years now, sleeping in the snow and everything this =
isn't=20
really us. We're really good people, strong, hard workers." </P>
<P><B>Kimitris</B> </P>
<P>"I remember coming to the Soup Kitchen as a young child and the =
Christmases=20
that we were able to pick out our own gifts ... my mother knew how to =
survive.=20
She knew how to do outreach for her children. If her children were in =
need, she=20
knew the places to go ... My mom died when I was 12 years old. My mother =

overdosed from drugs." </P>
<P><B>Marcel</B> </P>
<P>"My grandmother would just wash the pants every day and iron a clean =
shirt=20
and I was happy. Kids these days want $100 gym shoes and designer jeans =
... It's=20
a dog-eat-dog world out there. I got mine and you get yours, but if you =
get too=20
much more than me, then I'm going to take yours ... we're so prone to =
hate one=20
another for no reason at all." </P>
<P><I>You can reach Susan Whitall at (313) 222-2156 or&nbsp; <A=20
href=3D"mailto:swhitall@detnews.com">swhitall@detnews.com</A>.</I> </P>
<P><EM></EM>&nbsp;</P>
<P><EM></EM>&nbsp;</P>
<P><EM></EM>&nbsp;</P>
<P><EM></EM>&nbsp;</P>
<P><EM></EM>&nbsp;</P><!--endclickprintinclude--><!-- EDITORIAL: end =
body of the story --></DIV>
<DIV><FONT face=3DArial size=3D2><BR>William Charles Tinker <BR>New =
Hampshire=20
Homeless <BR>Founded 11-28-99<BR>25 Granite Street <BR>Northfield,N.H.=20
03276-1640 USA <BR>Advocates,activists for disabled,displaced human =
rights.=20
<BR>1-603-286-2492 <BR><A=20
href=3D"http://www.missingkids.com">http://www.missingkids.com</A> =
<BR><A=20
href=3D"http://www.nationalhomeless.org">http://www.nationalhomeless.org<=
/A>=20
<BR><A=20
href=3D"http://www.newhampshirehomeless.org">http://www.newhampshirehomel=
ess.org</A>=20
<BR><A=20
href=3D"http://www.newhampshirehomeless-subscribe@topica.com">http://www.=
newhampshirehomeless-subscribe@topica.com</A>=20
</FONT></DIV></BODY></HTML>

------=_NextPart_000_00E8_01C85287.EB5296A0--