[Hpn] Re: Homelessworld ~*** Concord Homeless man loses battle with alcoholism

Blazingstar ruben@blazingstar.org
Sat, 9 Feb 2008 09:17:00 -0800 (PST)


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  WAIT A MINUTE! STOP THE PRESS!
   
  You're telling me that a known alcoholic who happens to be homeless died of alcoholism instead of due to the fact he was stuck out in the freezing snow?! Let's see, if he had a disease other than alcoholism, he would have been taken care of in a nice hospital or clinic, but since the disease was alcoholism, he was left out in the cold and snow to fend for himself?
   
  Does this go along with the idea that people with the alcoholism disease can cure their own damn selves, and that's it? Like alcoholics don't deserve any help or shelter or housing or healthcare because of their particular disease? Is alcoholism like leprosy in the old days where lepers had to live in caves and such cuz nobody gave a damn about them either?
   
  Who are the least among us after all, if not those society shuns, persecutes or ignores the most; and indeed, alcoholics are on the top of that shit list alongside other drug addicts; but let's blame their diseases for killing them instead of our own heartless society and government more interested in bombing the hell out of millions of innocent people in the Middle East and in turn making millions of the survivors of these bombings over there homeless, hungry, maimed, sick and diseased, too.
   
  The lack of good treatment for needy people by society and government killed Steven Aliberti as it kills so many other homeless people in the U.S. in so many other ways, year-after-year, but the bottomline is society and government don't care enough about the least among us to help in any significant or meaningful way. They would rather spend tax dollars on needless foreign wars that just create more problems for more poor and oppressed people who are merely trying to survive in a world where OIL is considered far more precious than the human lives it takes to get it. And so on as we all know, the rich always getting richer at the expense of the poor who are written off as the collateral damage of doing business as per usual. rb
   
  

"William C. Tinker" <wtinker@verizon.net> wrote:
                              http://www.concordmonitor.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=/20080209/FRONTPAGE/802090315
   
  Concord

            Homeless man loses battle with alcoholism 
   
    Family says he was devoted to his son       
  By SARAH LIEBOWITZ
Monitor staff

         here-->February 09. 2008  

                         Steven Aliberti seemed to know he didn't have long to live. 
  His body was deteriorating, damaged by a decades-long battle with alcoholism and other illnesses. Homelessness was a further strain: For about seven years, Aliberti spent his days and nights outside, punctuated by occasional stays in jail and, when the temperature dipped, visits to First Congregational Church's emergency cold weather shelter. "He must have known he was really bad off," said Brenda Aliberti, Aliberti's ex-wife. 
  The morning of Jan. 26, Aliberti was found lying in the snow near a site frequented by Concord's homeless. Suffering from severe hypothermia, Aliberti, 52, spent several days in Concord Hospital's intensive care unit before dying Jan. 30, said David Keller, the pastor of First Congregational Church, where Aliberti had been sleeping. 
  Several days after arriving at the hospital, Aliberti's body seemed to begin shutting down, and he was placed on life support, Keller said. It's unclear how long Aliberti was lying in the snow before he was discovered. 
  Since First Congregational Church began opening its doors to Concord's homeless during the coldest months, Keller has presided over several funerals for shelter guests. Like Aliberti, there have been other men who died in middle age, often after years without a stable home. Aliberti's memorial service will take place this afternoon, at the church where he spent so many nights. 
  "We're just not ready," Brenda Aliberti said. "He kept making it through the winters, so we had hope." 
  Aliberti's years of homelessness belied his family ties. Unlike other shelter guests, Aliberti had a network of relatives and friends, several of whom lived in Concord. He doted on his and Brenda Aliberti's 10-year-old son; before becoming too ill, he took his son swimming and bike riding. After Brenda Aliberti helped her former husband purchase a cell phone, he called almost daily, she said. She repeatedly attempted to find him an apartment, making calls to landlords. When he went too long without checking in, she went searching. 
  "He had a family that continuously reached out to him," Keller said. "It's not a lost person. It's a person with a family and with connections and with love." Shortly before Aliberti's death, he spent time with his father and stepmother, who visited from Vermont, Keller said. Shelter volunteers and hospital workers also attempted to help. 
  Despite those links, Aliberti never managed to break free of his addiction. He drank heavily, imperiling his health, those who knew him said. Living without a home in Concord, he was surrounded by other drinkers. 
  "It's very hard for people to understand how overwhelming this illness is, especially if you're homeless and you have no hope," Keller said. "It's your coping mechanism." 
  Attempts to recover 
  But Aliberti's is also a story of attempted recovery, and the hurdles facing those seeking treatment. Just before his death, Aliberti made two attempts to enter a treatment facility, only to find that there were no open beds, Keller said. 
  On one occasion, employees at Concord Hospital helped Aliberti search for a treatment center opening - before they found one, however, Aliberti was discharged from the hospital, and he started drinking again shortly after, Keller said. After that first attempt, shelter workers helped Aliberti make more calls. 
  "I really believe that Steve was making as best of an attempt that he could to get sober, but (there was) no doubt that his addiction had gotten the best of him," Keller said. "But that's not to say he didn't want it," Keller added, referring to treatment. 
  The state contracts with six crisis sites in the state, where those addicted to alcohol or drugs can go for residential non-medical detoxification and counseling. The six sites provide a total of 54 beds, according to the state Department of Health and Human Services. Waiting lists are common, according to those who work with the homeless. To find an open bed, those seeking treatment need to call the crisis sites daily. Unlike private facilities, these centers admit patients regardless of their ability to pay. 
  "I know there aren't enough beds," said Keith Kuenning, executive director of the New Hampshire Coalition to End Homelessness. "Here you are, a homeless individual with no internet access, no phone, and you're supposed to make a daily phone call. 
  "The thing that's upsetting about this is that we know how to help these people," added Kuenning, who advocates the creation of permanent housing for the homeless, which make counseling and other support services available. 
  Stay-at-home dad 
  Alcohol didn't always hold such sway over Aliberti, who was born in New Haven, Conn. 
  He worked off and on as a mechanic before injuring himself, his former wife said. When he and Brenda Aliberti met a dozen years ago, he was a recovering alcoholic devoted to his treatment program. The first year of their son's life, it was Steven Aliberti - who had recently undergone a knee replacement - who stayed home to care for him. When Brenda Aliberti returned home at the end of the day, Aliberti would have the whole house clean, she said. 
  But when their son, Robert, was a toddler, Aliberti relapsed. His former wife suspects that a medication he was taking for Hepatitis C, which he likely contracted during a blood transfusion decades ago, may have harmed him. Depression is one possible side effect of the drug, called interferon. 
  Aliberti's drinking occasionally led to violence. Several years later, the couple divorced. 
  After Aliberti moved out of their Concord home, "he was never able to really get himself up again," Brenda Aliberti said. 
  Although Brenda Aliberti said that, "we begged him to get an apartment," Aliberti remained on the streets. He loved the outdoors; as long as the weather wasn't too cold, "it didn't really bother him," she said. From time to time, he was picked up for small thefts, including a 30-pack of Coors Light on one occasion and $60 worth of beer and wine on another, according to news reports. He spent time in jail. 
  When Brenda Aliberti tried to find him a room or an apartment, Aliberti told her that he was scared of the responsibility. He began frequenting the shelter at First Church several years ago, and became a regular guest again this winter, after spending time at the Red Roof Inn in Loudon, Keller said. 
  There were sober stretches - he spent time in a treatment program, and he couldn't drink while in jail. Brenda Aliberti wouldn't allow drinking in her home. Illness would send him to the hospital, and Aliberti would be temporarily sober. 
  "He was always trying to change through the years," Brenda Aliberti said. 
  But as Aliberti aged, his health declined. Apart from alcoholism, he had trouble with his blood pressure and other ailments, such as frostbite, according to his former wife. After being released from jail this winter, Aliberti was beginning to say that, "I'm too sick; I don't see a way out for myself," Keller said. "People were imploring him to believe that there really was a future for him." 
  Even as Aliberti felt increasingly ill, he helped family and friends, sharing money from his Social Security checks and, when he had it, alcohol, Brenda Aliberti said. "He would rather give and have everyone be happy," she said. Keller also knew Aliberti to have a reputation for buying things for others, even though he had little money for himself. 
  "He was very grateful and very respectful," Keller said. Aliberti was also a "person of profound faith," the sort of man who carried a Bible, Keller said. 
  Throughout, Aliberti's family and friends knew that, "Robert was who Steve lived for," Keller said. 
  Aliberti "really thought highly of his boy," said Charles, a friend of Aliberti's who is also homeless, and didn't want to give his last name. "He had some really nice sides to him." 
  For Aliberti, this winter brought frequent visits to the hospital; Keller estimates he was admitted three or four times in January. On one occasion, hospital employees helped refer him to a detoxification site, but there were no available beds. On another occasion, shelter workers took Aliberti to the hospital. 
  Aliberti didn't show up at the shelter the night of Jan. 25. The next morning, another shelter guest found Aliberti in the snow, Keller said. According to several people, Aliberti was discovered near Stickney Avenue. He was rushed to Concord Hospital. 
  "He was just a very caring, loving person," Brenda Aliberti said. "And it's very sad that he has to have this disease of alcoholism." 
  A memorial service will take place today at 2:30 p.m. at the First Congregational Church in Concord. Memorial donations may be made to the church, which is located at 177 North Main St., Concord, New Hampshire

  William Charles Tinker, Sr.
New Hampshire Homeless
Founded 11-28-99
25 Granite Street
Northfield,N.H. 03276-1640 USA
Advocates,activists for disabled,displaced human rights.
1-603-286-2492
http://www.missingkids.com
http://www.nationalhomeless.org
http://www.newhampshirehomeless.org
newhampshirehomeless-subscribe@topica.com

  

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<div>&nbsp;</div>  <div>&nbsp;</div>  <div>WAIT A MINUTE! STOP THE PRESS!</div>  <div>&nbsp;</div>  <div>You're telling me that a known alcoholic who happens to be homeless died of alcoholism instead of due to the fact he was stuck out in the freezing snow?! Let's see, if he had a disease other than alcoholism, he would have been taken care of in a nice hospital or clinic, but since the disease was alcoholism, he was left out in the cold and snow to fend for himself?</div>  <div>&nbsp;</div>  <div>Does this go along with the idea that people with the alcoholism disease can cure their own damn selves, and that's it? Like alcoholics don't deserve any help or shelter or housing or healthcare because of their particular disease? Is alcoholism like leprosy in the old days where lepers had to live in caves and such cuz nobody gave a damn about them either?</div>  <div>&nbsp;</div>  <div>Who are the least among us after all, if not those society shuns, persecutes or ignores the
 most; and indeed, alcoholics are on the top of that shit list alongside other drug addicts; but let's blame their diseases for killing them instead of our own heartless society and government more interested in bombing the hell out of millions of innocent people in the Middle East and in turn making millions of the survivors of these bombings over there homeless, hungry, maimed, sick and diseased, too.</div>  <div>&nbsp;</div>  <div>The lack of good treatment for needy people by society and government killed Steven Aliberti as it kills so many other homeless people in the U.S. in so many other ways, year-after-year, but the bottomline is society and government don't care enough about the least among us to help in any significant or meaningful way. They would rather spend tax dollars on needless foreign wars that just create more problems for more poor and oppressed people who are merely trying to survive in a world where OIL is considered far more precious than the human
 lives it takes to get it. And so on as we all know, the rich always getting richer at the expense of the poor who are written off as the collateral damage of doing business as per usual. rb</div>  <div>&nbsp;</div>  <div><BR><BR><B><I>"William C. Tinker" &lt;wtinker@verizon.net&gt;</I></B> wrote:</div>  <BLOCKQUOTE class=replbq style="PADDING-LEFT: 5px; MARGIN-LEFT: 5px; BORDER-LEFT: #1010ff 2px solid"><!--~-|**|PrettyHtmlStartT|**|-~-->  <DIV id=ygrp-mlmsg style="WIDTH: 655px; POSITION: relative">  <DIV id=ygrp-msg style="PADDING-RIGHT: 15px; PADDING-LEFT: 0px; Z-INDEX: 1; FLOAT: left; PADDING-BOTTOM: 0px; WIDTH: 490px; PADDING-TOP: 0px"><!--~-|**|PrettyHtmlEndT|**|-~-->  <DIV id=ygrp-text>  <div>  <DIV>  <TABLE cellPadding=0 width="100%" border=0>  <TBODY>  <TR>  <TD vAlign=top width="85%">  <TABLE cellSpacing=0 cellPadding=0 width="100%">  <TBODY>  <TR>  <TD class=hed4>  <DIV><FONT face=Arial size=2><A
 href="http://www.concordmonitor.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=/20080209/FRONTPAGE/802090315">http://www.concordm<WBR>onitor.com/<WBR>apps/pbcs.<WBR>dll/article?<WBR>AID=/20080209/<WBR>FRONTPAGE/<WBR>802090315</A></FONT></DIV>  <DIV>&nbsp;</DIV>  <DIV>Concord<BR></DIV></TD></TR>  <TR>  <TD>&nbsp; </TD></TR>  <TR>  <TD class=hed2>  <DIV>Homeless man loses battle with alcoholism </DIV>  <DIV>&nbsp;</DIV></TD></TR>  <TR>  <TD class=hed4>Family says he was devoted to his son </TD></TR></TBODY></TABLE></TD>  <TD vAlign=top align=right width="15%" rowSpan=2></TD></TR>  <TR>  <TD vAlign=top width="85%"><BR>  <DIV class=Byline>By SARAH LIEBOWITZ<BR>Monitor staff<BR></DIV></TD></TR>  <TR>  <TD vAlign=top width="100%" colSpan=2><FONT face=Arial size=2></FONT></TD></TR>  <TR>  <TD vAlign=top width="100%" colSpan=2><!--Note: PublishedDate does NOT use an object file so we put a <span> here--><SPAN class=dateforstories>February 09. 2008&nbsp;</SPAN> <BR><BR></TD></TR>  <TR>  <TD
 class=storybodytext colSpan=2>  <TABLE cellPadding=0 width="100%" border=0>  <TBODY>  <TR><!-- width was 482, modified 3/4/2004 -->  <TD vAlign=top width="100%">  <TABLE cellSpacing=5 cellPadding=0 align=right border=0>  <TBODY>  <TR>  <TD width=5></TD>  <TD align=middle><A href="http://cmads.sv.publicus.com/apps/OAMS.dll/href/CM001/MEDIUMRECTANGLE/FRONTPAGE/-1/-1/FRONTPAGE/4500/;URL=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.concordmonitor.com%2Fphotoextra" target=_blank></A>&nbsp;<NOSCRIPT></NOSCRIPT></TD></TR></TBODY></TABLE><SPAN class=storybodytext>  <div class=storybodytext>Steven Aliberti seemed to know he didn't have long to live. </div>  <div class=storybodytext>His body was deteriorating, damaged by a decades-long battle with alcoholism and other illnesses. Homelessness was a further strain: For about seven years, Aliberti spent his days and nights outside, punctuated by occasional stays in jail and, when the temperature dipped, visits to First Congregational Church's emergency cold
 weather shelter. "He must have known he was really bad off," said Brenda Aliberti, Aliberti's ex-wife. </div>  <div class=storybodytext>The morning of Jan. 26, Aliberti was found lying in the snow near a site frequented by Concord's homeless. Suffering from severe hypothermia, Aliberti, 52, spent several days in Concord Hospital's intensive care unit before dying Jan. 30, said David Keller, the pastor of First Congregational Church, where Aliberti had been sleeping. </div>  <div class=storybodytext>Several days after arriving at the hospital, Aliberti's body seemed to begin shutting down, and he was placed on life support, Keller said. It's unclear how long Aliberti was lying in the snow before he was discovered. </div>  <div class=storybodytext>Since First Congregational Church began opening its doors to Concord's homeless during the coldest months, Keller has presided over several funerals for shelter guests. Like Aliberti, there have been other men who died in middle
 age, often after years without a stable home. Aliberti's memorial service will take place this afternoon, at the church where he spent so many nights. </div>  <div class=storybodytext>"We're just not ready," Brenda Aliberti said. "He kept making it through the winters, so we had hope." </div>  <div class=storybodytext>Aliberti's years of homelessness belied his family ties. Unlike other shelter guests, Aliberti had a network of relatives and friends, several of whom lived in Concord. He doted on his and Brenda Aliberti's 10-year-old son; before becoming too ill, he took his son swimming and bike riding. After Brenda Aliberti helped her former husband purchase a cell phone, he called almost daily, she said. She repeatedly attempted to find him an apartment, making calls to landlords. When he went too long without checking in, she went searching. </div>  <div class=storybodytext>"He had a family that continuously reached out to him," Keller said. "It's not a lost person.
 It's a person with a family and with connections and with love." Shortly before Aliberti's death, he spent time with his father and stepmother, who visited from Vermont, Keller said. Shelter volunteers and hospital workers also attempted to help. </div>  <div class=storybodytext>Despite those links, Aliberti never managed to break free of his addiction. He drank heavily, imperiling his health, those who knew him said. Living without a home in Concord, he was surrounded by other drinkers. </div>  <div class=storybodytext>"It's very hard for people to understand how overwhelming this illness is, especially if you're homeless and you have no hope," Keller said. "It's your coping mechanism." </div>  <div class=storybodytext><B>Attempts to recover</B> </div>  <div class=storybodytext>But Aliberti's is also a story of attempted recovery, and the hurdles facing those seeking treatment. Just before his death, Aliberti made two attempts to enter a treatment facility, only to find
 that there were no open beds, Keller said. </div>  <div class=storybodytext>On one occasion, employees at Concord Hospital helped Aliberti search for a treatment center opening - before they found one, however, Aliberti was discharged from the hospital, and he started drinking again shortly after, Keller said. After that first attempt, shelter workers helped Aliberti make more calls. </div>  <div class=storybodytext>"I really believe that Steve was making as best of an attempt that he could to get sober, but (there was) no doubt that his addiction had gotten the best of him," Keller said. "But that's not to say he didn't want it," Keller added, referring to treatment. </div>  <div class=storybodytext>The state contracts with six crisis sites in the state, where those addicted to alcohol or drugs can go for residential non-medical detoxification and counseling. The six sites provide a total of 54 beds, according to the state Department of Health and Human Services. Waiting
 lists are common, according to those who work with the homeless. To find an open bed, those seeking treatment need to call the crisis sites daily. Unlike private facilities, these centers admit patients regardless of their ability to pay. </div>  <div class=storybodytext>"I know there aren't enough beds," said Keith Kuenning, executive director of the New Hampshire Coalition to End Homelessness. "Here you are, a homeless individual with no internet access, no phone, and you're supposed to make a daily phone call. </div>  <div class=storybodytext>"The thing that's upsetting about this is that we know how to help these people," added Kuenning, who advocates the creation of permanent housing for the homeless, which make counseling and other support services available. </div>  <div class=storybodytext><B>Stay-at-home dad</B> </div>  <div class=storybodytext>Alcohol didn't always hold such sway over Aliberti, who was born in New Haven, Conn. </div>  <div class=storybodytext>He
 worked off and on as a mechanic before injuring himself, his former wife said. When he and Brenda Aliberti met a dozen years ago, he was a recovering alcoholic devoted to his treatment program. The first year of their son's life, it was Steven Aliberti - who had recently undergone a knee replacement - who stayed home to care for him. When Brenda Aliberti returned home at the end of the day, Aliberti would have the whole house clean, she said. </div>  <div class=storybodytext>But when their son, Robert, was a toddler, Aliberti relapsed. His former wife suspects that a medication he was taking for Hepatitis C, which he likely contracted during a blood transfusion decades ago, may have harmed him. Depression is one possible side effect of the drug, called interferon. </div>  <div class=storybodytext>Aliberti's drinking occasionally led to violence. Several years later, the couple divorced. </div>  <div class=storybodytext>After Aliberti moved out of their Concord home, "he
 was never able to really get himself up again," Brenda Aliberti said. </div>  <div class=storybodytext>Although Brenda Aliberti said that, "we begged him to get an apartment," Aliberti remained on the streets. He loved the outdoors; as long as the weather wasn't too cold, "it didn't really bother him," she said. From time to time, he was picked up for small thefts, including a 30-pack of Coors Light on one occasion and $60 worth of beer and wine on another, according to news reports. He spent time in jail. </div>  <div class=storybodytext>When Brenda Aliberti tried to find him a room or an apartment, Aliberti told her that he was scared of the responsibility. He began frequenting the shelter at First Church several years ago, and became a regular guest again this winter, after spending time at the Red Roof Inn in Loudon, Keller said. </div>  <div class=storybodytext>There were sober stretches - he spent time in a treatment program, and he couldn't drink while in jail.
 Brenda Aliberti wouldn't allow drinking in her home. Illness would send him to the hospital, and Aliberti would be temporarily sober. </div>  <div class=storybodytext>"He was always trying to change through the years," Brenda Aliberti said. </div>  <div class=storybodytext>But as Aliberti aged, his health declined. Apart from alcoholism, he had trouble with his blood pressure and other ailments, such as frostbite, according to his former wife. After being released from jail this winter, Aliberti was beginning to say that, "I'm too sick; I don't see a way out for myself," Keller said. "People were imploring him to believe that there really was a future for him." </div>  <div class=storybodytext>Even as Aliberti felt increasingly ill, he helped family and friends, sharing money from his Social Security checks and, when he had it, alcohol, Brenda Aliberti said. "He would rather give and have everyone be happy," she said. Keller also knew Aliberti to have a reputation for
 buying things for others, even though he had little money for himself. </div>  <div class=storybodytext>"He was very grateful and very respectful," Keller said. Aliberti was also a "person of profound faith," the sort of man who carried a Bible, Keller said. </div>  <div class=storybodytext>Throughout, Aliberti's family and friends knew that, "Robert was who Steve lived for," Keller said. </div>  <div class=storybodytext>Aliberti "really thought highly of his boy," said Charles, a friend of Aliberti's who is also homeless, and didn't want to give his last name. "He had some really nice sides to him." </div>  <div class=storybodytext>For Aliberti, this winter brought frequent visits to the hospital; Keller estimates he was admitted three or four times in January. On one occasion, hospital employees helped refer him to a detoxification site, but there were no available beds. On another occasion, shelter workers took Aliberti to the hospital. </div>  <div
 class=storybodytext>Aliberti didn't show up at the shelter the night of Jan. 25. The next morning, another shelter guest found Aliberti in the snow, Keller said. According to several people, Aliberti was discovered near Stickney Avenue. He was rushed to Concord Hospital. </div>  <div class=storybodytext>"He was just a very caring, loving person," Brenda Aliberti said. "And it's very sad that he has to have this disease of alcoholism." </div>  <div class=storybodytext><I><B>A memorial service will take place today at 2:30 p.m. at the First Congregational Church in Concord. Memorial donations may be made to the church, which is located at 177 North Main St., Concord, New Hampshire</B></I></div></SPAN></TD></TR></TBODY></TABLE></TD></TR></TBODY></TABLE></DIV>  <DIV><FONT face=Arial size=2>William Charles Tinker, Sr.<BR>New Hampshire Homeless<BR>Founded 11-28-99<BR>25 Granite Street<BR>Northfield,N.<WBR>H. 03276-1640 USA<BR>Advocates,activists for disabled,displaced human
 rights.<BR>1-603-286-2492<BR><A href="http://www.missingkids.com/">http://www.missingk<WBR>ids.com</A><BR><A href="http://www.nationalhomeless.org/">http://www.national<WBR>homeless.<WBR>org</A><BR><A href="http://www.newhampshirehomeless.org/">http://www.newhamps<WBR>hirehomeless.<WBR>org</A><BR><A href="mailto:newhampshirehomeless-subscribe@topica.com">newhampshirehomeles<WBR>s-subscribe@<WBR>topica.com</A><BR></FONT></DIV>  <div></div></DIV><!--~-|**|PrettyHtmlStart|**|-~--><SPAN style="COLOR: white" width="1">__._,_.___</SPAN> <!-- Start the section with Message In topic -->  <DIV id=ygrp-actbar><SPAN class=left><A href="http://groups.yahoo.com/group/Homelessworld/message/15466;_ylc=X3oDMTM2Zzl0a2gyBF9TAzk3MzU5NzE0BGdycElkAzcxNjY0MDEEZ3Jwc3BJZAMxNzA1MDY0MzA1BG1zZ0lkAzE1NDY2BHNlYwNmdHIEc2xrA3Z0cGMEc3RpbWUDMTIwMjU3Mzc4OAR0cGNJZAMxNTQ2Ng--">Messages in this topic </A>(<SPAN class=bld>1</SPAN>) </SPAN><A
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