[Hpn] World TB Day - March 24

William Charles Tinker wtinker@verizon.net
Wed, 22 Mar 2006 19:07:57 -0500


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22_114509_4_cnw_cnw



World TB Day - March 24

2006-03-22

TUBERCULOSIS - STILL A GLOBAL EMERGENCY TORONTO, March 22 /CNW/ -

On March 24, 1882, Robert Koch announced that he had isolated and grown =
the
tubercle bacillus, which he believed to be the cause of all forms of
tuberculosis. World TB Day is held on March 24 each year in =
commemoration of
Koch's discovery, for which he was awarded the Nobel Prize in Medicine =
in
1905.

Almost 125 years since Robert Koch's announcement, this infectious =
disease
remains a global emergency, with almost eight million new cases each =
year
and more than two million deaths worldwide annually.

Canada has approximately 1600 new cases of TB each year with more than =
40
per cent of these cases occurring in Ontario. The City of Toronto alone =
has
over 20 per cent of all TB cases in Canada each year, almost one newly
diagnosed case each day.

"Most new cases of tuberculosis in Canada originate outside the country,
underscoring the fact that TB is a global disease and must be addressed =
as a
global problem," says Dr. Michael Gardam, spokesperson for The Lung
Association and director, Infection Prevention and Control and medical
director, Tuberculosis Clinic, University Health Network, Toronto.
"Tuberculosis is preventable, treatable and curable. It must be =
addressed
both globally and locally as part of an effective public health =
strategy."

TB is most prevalent in developing nations, many of them subject to
situations of war, famine and natural disasters. Indeed, 96 per cent of =
all
worldwide cases occur in these nations. Mobility of populations towards =
more
industrialized nations means that TB will not be eliminated in our =
society
unless it is controlled in developing countries. This requires a global
effort and the political will of industrialized countries.

The theme of World TB Day 2006 is Actions for life: towards a world free =
of
tuberculosis. This campaign supports the global plan to "Stop TB =
2006-2015"
aiming to mobilize communities, raise awareness and encourage =
governments
and donors to ensure that TB deaths and disease are reduced by 50 per =
cent
by 2015 and eliminated by 2050.

The Lung Association began more than a century ago in an effort to =
control
the spread of tuberculosis. Today the charitable organization offers =
support
and resources for both the public and health professionals. Consumer =
health
materials include a brochure: Facts about Your Lungs: Tuberculosis and =
two
posters: Positive Skin Test, explaining the difference between Active TB
Disease and Latent TB Infection and Think TB if you work or volunteer =
in...,
which describes TB symptoms and lists occupations and workplaces that
increase the risk of exposure. All materials are available free of =
charge
through The Lung Association's Lung Health Information Line at
1-800-972-2636.

For health care professionals, The Lung Association offers a booklet,
Tuberculosis: Information for Health Care Providers and is planning a
conference, The Face of TB, in Toronto on November 20 - 21, 2006. To =
order
the booklet, call 1-800-972-2636. Conference details will be available =
at
www.on.lung.ca this spring.

What is Tuberculosis? TB is an infectious disease caused by bacteria. It
usually attacks the lungs but can occur in other parts of the body. TB =
is an
infectious disease and it is most contagious when located in the lungs =
or
throat. Signs and symptoms of active TB disease are: a cough lasting =
more
than three weeks, fever, chills, unexplained weight loss, night sweats =
and
coughing up blood.

TB disease is curable but must be treated, usually by taking four or =
more
different antibiotics for at least six months. TB drugs are provided
free-of- charge by the Ministry of Health and Long-Term Care.

People can also have latent TB infection (LTBI) when they have been =
exposed
to the TB bacteria but their immune system is strong enough to contain =
it. A
person with LTBI will have a positive skin test but will not have =
symptoms
and is not contagious. People with inactive or latent TB infection can =
take
medicine that will prevent the bacteria from growing later in their =
life.

TB continues to be a disease associated with socially disadvantaged
conditions. As such, individuals at increased risk for TB include those =
who
are homeless or under-housed, malnourished or living in poverty. Because
most cases of active TB occur in developing countries, individuals in =
our
environment who come from high prevalence areas are also at risk of
developing TB. The elderly are at risk as well, especially those living =
in
institutions.

Medical conditions such as HIV/AIDS increase the risk of TB.

Because TB is a communicable disease, anyone coming into contact with =
active
cases is at risk of contracting TB. Anyone exhibiting symptoms should =
see
his or her physician immediately. All cases of TB must be reported to =
public
health.

The Lung Association is a registered charity that provides information =
and
funding for research to improve lung health. We focus on the prevention =
and
control of asthma, chronic lung disease, tobacco cessation and =
prevention as
well as air quality and its effects on lung health. For further =
information
on lung health or smoking cessation call The Lung Association at
1-888-566-5864 or visit http://www.on.lung.ca.








William Charles Tinker

New Hampshire Homeless / Founded 11-28-99
25 Granite Street
Northfield,N.H. 03276-1640 USA
Advocates,activists for disabled,displaced human rights.
1-603-286-2492
http://www.missingkids.com
http://www.missingadults.org
http://www.nationalhomeless.org
http://www.newhampshirehomeless.org
newhampshirehomeless-subscribe@topica.com


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t=3D20060322_114509_4_cnw_cnw</A><BR></DIV>
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<DIV>World TB Day - March 24<BR><BR>2006-03-22<BR><BR>TUBERCULOSIS - =
STILL A=20
GLOBAL EMERGENCY TORONTO, March 22 /CNW/ -<BR><BR>On March 24, 1882, =
Robert Koch=20
announced that he had isolated and grown the<BR>tubercle bacillus, which =
he=20
believed to be the cause of all forms of<BR>tuberculosis. World TB Day =
is held=20
on March 24 each year in commemoration of<BR>Koch's discovery, for which =
he was=20
awarded the Nobel Prize in Medicine in<BR>1905.<BR><BR>Almost 125 years =
since=20
Robert Koch's announcement, this infectious disease<BR>remains a global=20
emergency, with almost eight million new cases each year<BR>and more =
than two=20
million deaths worldwide annually.<BR><BR>Canada has approximately 1600 =
new=20
cases of TB each year with more than 40<BR>per cent of these cases =
occurring in=20
Ontario. The City of Toronto alone has<BR>over 20 per cent of all TB =
cases in=20
Canada each year, almost one newly<BR>diagnosed case each =
day.<BR><BR>"Most new=20
cases of tuberculosis in Canada originate outside the =
country,<BR>underscoring=20
the fact that TB is a global disease and must be addressed as =
a<BR>global=20
problem," says Dr. Michael Gardam, spokesperson for The =
Lung<BR>Association and=20
director, Infection Prevention and Control and medical<BR>director, =
Tuberculosis=20
Clinic, University Health Network, Toronto.<BR>"Tuberculosis is =
preventable,=20
treatable and curable. It must be addressed<BR>both globally and locally =
as part=20
of an effective public health strategy."<BR><BR>TB is most prevalent in=20
developing nations, many of them subject to<BR>situations of war, famine =
and=20
natural disasters. Indeed, 96 per cent of all<BR>worldwide cases occur =
in these=20
nations. Mobility of populations towards more<BR>industrialized nations =
means=20
that TB will not be eliminated in our society<BR>unless it is controlled =
in=20
developing countries. This requires a global<BR>effort and the political =
will of=20
industrialized countries.<BR><BR>The theme of World TB Day 2006 is =
Actions for=20
life: towards a world free of<BR>tuberculosis. This campaign supports =
the global=20
plan to "Stop TB 2006-2015"<BR>aiming to mobilize communities, raise =
awareness=20
and encourage governments<BR>and donors to ensure that TB deaths and =
disease are=20
reduced by 50 per cent<BR>by 2015 and eliminated by 2050.<BR><BR>The =
Lung=20
Association began more than a century ago in an effort to control<BR>the =
spread=20
of tuberculosis. Today the charitable organization offers support<BR>and =

resources for both the public and health professionals. Consumer=20
health<BR>materials include a brochure: Facts about Your Lungs: =
Tuberculosis and=20
two<BR>posters: Positive Skin Test, explaining the difference between =
Active=20
TB<BR>Disease and Latent TB Infection and Think TB if you work or =
volunteer=20
in...,<BR>which describes TB symptoms and lists occupations and =
workplaces=20
that<BR>increase the risk of exposure. All materials are available free =
of=20
charge<BR>through The Lung Association's Lung Health Information Line=20
at<BR>1-800-972-2636.<BR><BR>For health care professionals, The Lung =
Association=20
offers a booklet,<BR>Tuberculosis: Information for Health Care Providers =
and is=20
planning a<BR>conference, The Face of TB, in Toronto on November 20 - =
21, 2006.=20
To order<BR>the booklet, call 1-800-972-2636. Conference details will be =

available at<BR><A href=3D"">www.on.lung.ca</A> this spring.<BR><BR>What =
is=20
Tuberculosis? TB is an infectious disease caused by bacteria. =
It<BR>usually=20
attacks the lungs but can occur in other parts of the body. TB is=20
an<BR>infectious disease and it is most contagious when located in the =
lungs=20
or<BR>throat. Signs and symptoms of active TB disease are: a cough =
lasting=20
more<BR>than three weeks, fever, chills, unexplained weight loss, night =
sweats=20
and<BR>coughing up blood.<BR><BR>TB disease is curable but must be =
treated,=20
usually by taking four or more<BR>different antibiotics for at least six =
months.=20
TB drugs are provided<BR>free-of- charge by the Ministry of Health and =
Long-Term=20
Care.<BR><BR>People can also have latent TB infection (LTBI) when they =
have been=20
exposed<BR>to the TB bacteria but their immune system is strong enough =
to=20
contain it. A<BR>person with LTBI will have a positive skin test but =
will not=20
have symptoms<BR>and is not contagious. People with inactive or latent =
TB=20
infection can take<BR>medicine that will prevent the bacteria from =
growing later=20
in their life.<BR><BR>TB continues to be a disease associated with =
socially=20
disadvantaged<BR>conditions. As such, individuals at increased risk for =
TB=20
include those who<BR>are homeless or under-housed, malnourished or =
living in=20
poverty. Because<BR>most cases of active TB occur in developing =
countries,=20
individuals in our<BR>environment who come from high prevalence areas =
are also=20
at risk of<BR>developing TB. The elderly are at risk as well, especially =
those=20
living in<BR>institutions.<BR><BR>Medical conditions such as HIV/AIDS =
increase=20
the risk of TB.<BR><BR>Because TB is a communicable disease, anyone =
coming into=20
contact with active<BR>cases is at risk of contracting TB. Anyone =
exhibiting=20
symptoms should see<BR>his or her physician immediately. All cases of TB =
must be=20
reported to public<BR>health.<BR><BR>The Lung Association is a =
registered=20
charity that provides information and<BR>funding for research to improve =
lung=20
health. We focus on the prevention and<BR>control of asthma, chronic =
lung=20
disease, tobacco cessation and prevention as<BR>well as air quality and =
its=20
effects on lung health. For further information<BR>on lung health or =
smoking=20
cessation call The Lung Association at<BR>1-888-566-5864 or visit <A=20
href=3D"http://www.on.lung.ca">http://www.on.lung.ca</A>.</DIV>
<DIV>&nbsp;</DIV>
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<DIV><FONT face=3DArial size=3D2></FONT>&nbsp;</DIV>
<DIV><FONT face=3DArial size=3D2></FONT>&nbsp;</DIV>
<DIV><FONT face=3DArial size=3D2>William Charles Tinker</FONT></DIV>
<DIV>&nbsp;</DIV>
<DIV><FONT face=3DArial size=3D2>New Hampshire Homeless / Founded =
11-28-99<BR>25=20
Granite Street<BR>Northfield,N.H. 03276-1640 USA<BR>Advocates,activists =
for=20
disabled,displaced human rights.<BR>1-603-286-2492<BR><A=20
href=3D"http://www.missingkids.com">http://www.missingkids.com</A><BR><A =

href=3D"http://www.missingadults.org">http://www.missingadults.org</A><BR=
><A=20
href=3D"http://www.nationalhomeless.org">http://www.nationalhomeless.org<=
/A><BR><A=20
href=3D"http://www.newhampshirehomeless.org">http://www.newhampshirehomel=
ess.org</A><BR><A=20
href=3D"mailto:newhampshirehomeless-subscribe@topica.com">newhampshirehom=
eless-subscribe@topica.com</A></FONT></DIV>

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