[Hpn] The new immigrants: 'If you don't want us here, we'll take our skills and go'

William Charles Tinker wtinker@verizon.net
Sun, 27 Aug 2006 05:44:14 -0400


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http://news.independent.co.uk/uk/this_britain/article1222086.ece

The new immigrants: 'If you don't want us here, we'll take our skills =
and go'=20
Young, talented Poles like Ewa have come to Britain in their thousands. =
Now many are feeling very unwelcome=20
By Cole Moreton=20
Published: 27 August 2006=20
Ewa came to do a job nobody else wanted. She flew to England from Poland =
at the age of 22 to be a carer in a residential home, helping elderly =
people to bathe, dress, eat and go to the toilet. The hours were long =
and the pay low. The work was hard, physically and emotionally: she saw, =
close up, sickness, dementia and incontinence.=20

Ewa stuck it out. She wrestled with the language and with loneliness, =
finding friends, a flat, and even love with an Englishman - for a while. =
She made a life for herself that she likes. Ewa loves England. But now, =
after two years and so much effort, the way much of England seems to =
feel about immigrants is making people like Ewa want to leave.

"If we are not wanted here, then it makes us want to go," she says =
quietly, speaking for herself and her sister.

The people she knows are nice, but the headlines are not. The Polish are =
stealing jobs, living off benefits and sending the country to hell, a =
raging taxi driver told her. Remembering his anger with a shudder, she =
says: "If that is how people feel then maybe it is time to go to another =
country."

She was afraid this would happen. The first time we met, in the spring =
of 2004, Ewa was working as a waitress in a vegetarian restaurant in =
Krakow but preparing to come to England. "Is it dangerous?" she asked =
then, after seeing angry English people on the television ranting about =
the "tidal wave" of beggars, criminals and scroungers they feared would =
flood Britain when eight former eastern bloc countries joined the EU.

Far more people came than was expected - 600,000, it emerged last week - =
but only a tiny number have claimed benefits. The crime rate has not =
soared. Those who predicted disaster now say unemployment is being =
driven up and wages down. But economists and business leaders praise the =
new Europeans, who contribute about =A32.5bn a year to the economy; and =
research by the Joseph Rowntree Foundation has found that employers =
prefer hard-working EU migrants to the British, who are perceived to be =
lazier and unwilling to do low-skilled work.

Ewa did not find it dangerous at all. She has made many friends here. =
"English people are lovely." But the angry people she saw on the =
television have a new scare now: the anticipated arrival of Romanians =
and Bulgarians in January. The taxi driver turned on Ewa when he found =
out where she was from. "That was the worst moment in my life," she =
says. "I felt terrible. He was a racist to me, just a nasty guy. He said =
we should not be here. That was the first time I thought 'I might as =
well go home'."

Now she and her sister, who is teaching here, are discussing what to do. =
"I do feel guilty when I say I am Polish. I feel guilty because I know =
there are so many of us here and not everyone is happy with us. I worry =
that things will get worse."

The Zandman sisters left Poland because they could not find work - Ewa =
is a physiotherapist but was earning less than =A3100 a month in Krakow =
- and they do not want to go back to Poland yet. "It has so many =
troubles, the government is disgraceful: nationalist, full of prejudice. =
So we are really thinking, if we are not wanted here, maybe we should go =
somewhere else?"

If that feeling is shared by many of her compatriots it will be our =
loss. Reports from Poland suggest Britain got the better part of the EU =
deal. Even cheap flights were out of reach of the poorest, most =
desperate Poles in 2004, so those who came had to be highly motivated =
and willing to do jobs for which they were vastly overqualified. "I did =
not come here to live on benefits. All my Polish friends here work =
really hard, they just want to make a living. That should be respected, =
I think."

Ewa came with an employment agency, but hundreds of Poles continue to =
turn up at the airports or at Victoria Coach Station every week, with =
empty pockets and heads full of how easy it will be to get work here. =
Some end up working for gangmasters on pitiful wages, paying dearly to =
live in hovels, or on the streets. A London homeless charity has asked =
for help from a Polish counterpart after meeting so many Poles on its =
soup runs. "Quite a number have been sold down the river," said Tim =
Nicholls of the Simon Community last week, "having met unscrupulous =
people who have put them into forms of slave labour."

Ewa has claimed benefits. "But only for a month, between jobs. I could =
not survive otherwise. I wrote a letter afterwards to say thank you." =
She is not so lonely or homesick these days, despite breaking up with =
her boyfriend. She works in a charity shop in Redhill for not much =
money, half of which goes on the rent of a room in a shared house. It is =
simply furnished but looks splendid to her. "If I was still in Poland I =
could not afford to live in a room like this."

A television was donated by a friend. Her computer is old. But these are =
treasured possessions she could not have in Krakow. "The biggest thing, =
for me, is my camera. It cost =A3100. I could not have afforded it in =
Poland, no way. But this is a very important way I express myself. If =
you are denied such a thing, then life can be empty."

Ewa came to learn the language, see the country and earn some money. Her =
English is good, her walls are decorated with stunning photographs of =
Welsh mountains that she took herself, but money is still a problem. =
"England is expensive, and people here use money they do not have. I =
have never been in debt in my life, but now I have a credit card."

On the night she moved out of her flat in Krakow in 2004, the medieval =
main square was filling with people. They were celebrating Poland =
joining the European Union on 1 May. As a lone trumpeter sounded from a =
tower high above the Rynek Glowny square at midnight, a tearful young =
man full of honey vodka tried to explain what it meant. "Our history =
begins again. After the Soviet years, we are equals at last with all =
Europeans."

Not yet, it seems. Not while their presence in this country provokes =
resentment and fear. "It seems we are not seen as equal," says Ewa, =
sadly. "If we were, then people would not say the things they do."

THE FIGURES

26,000 PEOPLE were expected by ministers to come to Britain after 10 =
countries joined the EU on 1 May 2004.

427,000 WORKERS from those countries have registered in the UK since =
that date.

600,000 HAVE COME, says the Home Office, once partners, children and =
self-employed workers are included.

264,560 POLISH people have arrived in the UK since May 2004.

74,300 IS THE OVERALL INCREASE in immigrants here from the 10 accession =
countries, once the number of departures is subtracted.

350,000 ROMANIANS will come after 1 January, according to their own =
government's estimates.=20

Ewa came to do a job nobody else wanted. She flew to England from Poland =
at the age of 22 to be a carer in a residential home, helping elderly =
people to bathe, dress, eat and go to the toilet. The hours were long =
and the pay low. The work was hard, physically and emotionally: she saw, =
close up, sickness, dementia and incontinence.=20

Ewa stuck it out. She wrestled with the language and with loneliness, =
finding friends, a flat, and even love with an Englishman - for a while. =
She made a life for herself that she likes. Ewa loves England. But now, =
after two years and so much effort, the way much of England seems to =
feel about immigrants is making people like Ewa want to leave.

"If we are not wanted here, then it makes us want to go," she says =
quietly, speaking for herself and her sister.

The people she knows are nice, but the headlines are not. The Polish are =
stealing jobs, living off benefits and sending the country to hell, a =
raging taxi driver told her. Remembering his anger with a shudder, she =
says: "If that is how people feel then maybe it is time to go to another =
country."

She was afraid this would happen. The first time we met, in the spring =
of 2004, Ewa was working as a waitress in a vegetarian restaurant in =
Krakow but preparing to come to England. "Is it dangerous?" she asked =
then, after seeing angry English people on the television ranting about =
the "tidal wave" of beggars, criminals and scroungers they feared would =
flood Britain when eight former eastern bloc countries joined the EU.

Far more people came than was expected - 600,000, it emerged last week - =
but only a tiny number have claimed benefits. The crime rate has not =
soared. Those who predicted disaster now say unemployment is being =
driven up and wages down. But economists and business leaders praise the =
new Europeans, who contribute about =A32.5bn a year to the economy; and =
research by the Joseph Rowntree Foundation has found that employers =
prefer hard-working EU migrants to the British, who are perceived to be =
lazier and unwilling to do low-skilled work.

Ewa did not find it dangerous at all. She has made many friends here. =
"English people are lovely." But the angry people she saw on the =
television have a new scare now: the anticipated arrival of Romanians =
and Bulgarians in January. The taxi driver turned on Ewa when he found =
out where she was from. "That was the worst moment in my life," she =
says. "I felt terrible. He was a racist to me, just a nasty guy. He said =
we should not be here. That was the first time I thought 'I might as =
well go home'."

Now she and her sister, who is teaching here, are discussing what to do. =
"I do feel guilty when I say I am Polish. I feel guilty because I know =
there are so many of us here and not everyone is happy with us. I worry =
that things will get worse."

The Zandman sisters left Poland because they could not find work - Ewa =
is a physiotherapist but was earning less than =A3100 a month in Krakow =
- and they do not want to go back to Poland yet. "It has so many =
troubles, the government is disgraceful: nationalist, full of prejudice. =
So we are really thinking, if we are not wanted here, maybe we should go =
somewhere else?"

If that feeling is shared by many of her compatriots it will be our =
loss. Reports from Poland suggest Britain got the better part of the EU =
deal. Even cheap flights were out of reach of the poorest, most =
desperate Poles in 2004, so those who came had to be highly motivated =
and willing to do jobs for which they were vastly overqualified. "I did =
not come here to live on benefits. All my Polish friends here work =
really hard, they just want to make a living. That should be respected, =
I think."

Ewa came with an employment agency, but hundreds of Poles continue to =
turn up at the airports or at Victoria Coach Station every week, with =
empty pockets and heads full of how easy it will be to get work here. =
Some end up working for gangmasters on pitiful wages, paying dearly to =
live in hovels, or on the streets. A London homeless charity has asked =
for help from a Polish counterpart after meeting so many Poles on its =
soup runs. "Quite a number have been sold down the river," said Tim =
Nicholls of the Simon Community last week, "having met unscrupulous =
people who have put them into forms of slave labour."

Ewa has claimed benefits. "But only for a month, between jobs. I could =
not survive otherwise. I wrote a letter afterwards to say thank you." =
She is not so lonely or homesick these days, despite breaking up with =
her boyfriend. She works in a charity shop in Redhill for not much =
money, half of which goes on the rent of a room in a shared house. It is =
simply furnished but looks splendid to her. "If I was still in Poland I =
could not afford to live in a room like this."

A television was donated by a friend. Her computer is old. But these are =
treasured possessions she could not have in Krakow. "The biggest thing, =
for me, is my camera. It cost =A3100. I could not have afforded it in =
Poland, no way. But this is a very important way I express myself. If =
you are denied such a thing, then life can be empty."

Ewa came to learn the language, see the country and earn some money. Her =
English is good, her walls are decorated with stunning photographs of =
Welsh mountains that she took herself, but money is still a problem. =
"England is expensive, and people here use money they do not have. I =
have never been in debt in my life, but now I have a credit card."

On the night she moved out of her flat in Krakow in 2004, the medieval =
main square was filling with people. They were celebrating Poland =
joining the European Union on 1 May. As a lone trumpeter sounded from a =
tower high above the Rynek Glowny square at midnight, a tearful young =
man full of honey vodka tried to explain what it meant. "Our history =
begins again. After the Soviet years, we are equals at last with all =
Europeans."

Not yet, it seems. Not while their presence in this country provokes =
resentment and fear. "It seems we are not seen as equal," says Ewa, =
sadly. "If we were, then people would not say the things they do."

THE FIGURES

26,000 PEOPLE were expected by ministers to come to Britain after 10 =
countries joined the EU on 1 May 2004.

427,000 WORKERS from those countries have registered in the UK since =
that date.

600,000 HAVE COME, says the Home Office, once partners, children and =
self-employed workers are included.

264,560 POLISH people have arrived in the UK since May 2004.

74,300 IS THE OVERALL INCREASE in immigrants here from the 10 accession =
countries, once the number of departures is subtracted.

350,000 ROMANIANS will come after 1 January, according to their own =
government's estimates.=20

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<H1><A=20
href=3D"http://news.independent.co.uk/uk/this_britain/article1222086.ece"=
>http://news.independent.co.uk/uk/this_britain/article1222086.ece</A></H1=
>
<H1>&nbsp;</H1>
<H1>The new immigrants: 'If you don't want us here, we'll take our =
skills and=20
go' <SPAN class=3Dstarrating></SPAN></H1>
<H2>Young, talented Poles like Ewa have come to Britain in their =
thousands. Now=20
many are feeling very unwelcome </H2>
<H3>By Cole Moreton </H3>
<H4>Published:&nbsp;27 August 2006 </H4>
<DIV class=3DbodyCopy>
<DIV class=3DarticleButton>
<DIV class=3Dad id=3Darticlebutton></DIV></DIV>
<DIV id=3DbodyCopyContent style=3D"DISPLAY: none">
<P>Ewa came to do a job nobody else wanted. She flew to England from =
Poland at=20
the age of 22 to be a carer in a residential home, helping elderly =
people to=20
bathe, dress, eat and go to the toilet. The hours were long and the pay =
low. The=20
work was hard, physically and emotionally: she saw, close up, sickness, =
dementia=20
and incontinence. </P>
<P>Ewa stuck it out. She wrestled with the language and with loneliness, =
finding=20
friends, a flat, and even love with an Englishman - for a while. She =
made a life=20
for herself that she likes. Ewa loves England. But now, after two years =
and so=20
much effort, the way much of England seems to feel about immigrants is =
making=20
people like Ewa want to leave.</P>
<P>"If we are not wanted here, then it makes us want to go," she says =
quietly,=20
speaking for herself and her sister.</P>
<P>The people she knows are nice, but the headlines are not. The Polish =
are=20
stealing jobs, living off benefits and sending the country to hell, a =
raging=20
taxi driver told her. Remembering his anger with a shudder, she says: =
"If that=20
is how people feel then maybe it is time to go to another country."</P>
<P>She was afraid this would happen. The first time we met, in the =
spring of=20
2004, Ewa was working as a waitress in a vegetarian restaurant in Krakow =
but=20
preparing to come to England. "Is it dangerous?" she asked then, after =
seeing=20
angry English people on the television ranting about the "tidal wave" of =

beggars, criminals and scroungers they feared would flood Britain when =
eight=20
former eastern bloc countries joined the EU.</P>
<P>Far more people came than was expected - 600,000, it emerged last =
week - but=20
only a tiny number have claimed benefits. The crime rate has not soared. =
Those=20
who predicted disaster now say unemployment is being driven up and wages =
down.=20
But economists and business leaders praise the new Europeans, who =
contribute=20
about =A32.5bn a year to the economy; and research by the Joseph =
Rowntree=20
Foundation has found that employers prefer hard-working EU migrants to =
the=20
British, who are perceived to be lazier and unwilling to do low-skilled=20
work.</P>
<P>Ewa did not find it dangerous at all. She has made many friends here. =

"English people are lovely." But the angry people she saw on the =
television have=20
a new scare now: the anticipated arrival of Romanians and Bulgarians in =
January.=20
The taxi driver turned on Ewa when he found out where she was from. =
"That was=20
the worst moment in my life," she says. "I felt terrible. He was a =
racist to me,=20
just a nasty guy. He said we should not be here. That was the first time =
I=20
thought 'I might as well go home'."</P>
<P>Now she and her sister, who is teaching here, are discussing what to =
do. "I=20
do feel guilty when I say I am Polish. I feel guilty because I know =
there are so=20
many of us here and not everyone is happy with us. I worry that things =
will get=20
worse."</P>
<P>The Zandman sisters left Poland because they could not find work - =
Ewa is a=20
physiotherapist but was earning less than =A3100 a month in Krakow - and =
they do=20
not want to go back to Poland yet. "It has so many troubles, the =
government is=20
disgraceful: nationalist, full of prejudice. So we are really thinking, =
if we=20
are not wanted here, maybe we should go somewhere else?"</P>
<P>If that feeling is shared by many of her compatriots it will be our =
loss.=20
Reports from Poland suggest Britain got the better part of the EU deal. =
Even=20
cheap flights were out of reach of the poorest, most desperate Poles in =
2004, so=20
those who came had to be highly motivated and willing to do jobs for =
which they=20
were vastly overqualified. "I did not come here to live on benefits. All =
my=20
Polish friends here work really hard, they just want to make a living. =
That=20
should be respected, I think."</P>
<P>Ewa came with an employment agency, but hundreds of Poles continue to =
turn up=20
at the airports or at Victoria Coach Station every week, with empty =
pockets and=20
heads full of how easy it will be to get work here. Some end up working =
for=20
gangmasters on pitiful wages, paying dearly to live in hovels, or on the =

streets. A London homeless charity has asked for help from a Polish =
counterpart=20
after meeting so many Poles on its soup runs. "Quite a number have been =
sold=20
down the river," said Tim Nicholls of the Simon Community last week, =
"having met=20
unscrupulous people who have put them into forms of slave labour."</P>
<P>Ewa has claimed benefits. "But only for a month, between jobs. I =
could not=20
survive otherwise. I wrote a letter afterwards to say thank you." She is =
not so=20
lonely or homesick these days, despite breaking up with her boyfriend. =
She works=20
in a charity shop in Redhill for not much money, half of which goes on =
the rent=20
of a room in a shared house. It is simply furnished but looks splendid =
to her.=20
"If I was still in Poland I could not afford to live in a room like =
this."</P>
<P>A television was donated by a friend. Her computer is old. But these =
are=20
treasured possessions she could not have in Krakow. "The biggest thing, =
for me,=20
is my camera. It cost =A3100. I could not have afforded it in Poland, no =
way. But=20
this is a very important way I express myself. If you are denied such a =
thing,=20
then life can be empty."</P>
<P>Ewa came to learn the language, see the country and earn some money. =
Her=20
English is good, her walls are decorated with stunning photographs of =
Welsh=20
mountains that she took herself, but money is still a problem. "England =
is=20
expensive, and people here use money they do not have. I have never been =
in debt=20
in my life, but now I have a credit card."</P>
<P>On the night she moved out of her flat in Krakow in 2004, the =
medieval main=20
square was filling with people. They were celebrating Poland joining the =

European Union on 1 May. As a lone trumpeter sounded from a tower high =
above the=20
Rynek Glowny square at midnight, a tearful young man full of honey vodka =
tried=20
to explain what it meant. "Our history begins again. After the Soviet =
years, we=20
are equals at last with all Europeans."</P>
<P>Not yet, it seems. Not while their presence in this country provokes=20
resentment and fear. "It seems we are not seen as equal," says Ewa, =
sadly. "If=20
we were, then people would not say the things they do."</P>
<P>THE FIGURES</P>
<P>26,000 PEOPLE were expected by ministers to come to Britain after 10=20
countries joined the EU on 1 May 2004.</P>
<P>427,000 WORKERS from those countries have registered in the UK since =
that=20
date.</P>
<P>600,000 HAVE COME, says the Home Office, once partners, children and=20
self-employed workers are included.</P>
<P>264,560 POLISH people have arrived in the UK since May 2004.</P>
<P>74,300 IS THE OVERALL INCREASE in immigrants here from the 10 =
accession=20
countries, once the number of departures is subtracted.</P>
<P>350,000 ROMANIANS will come after 1 January, according to their own=20
government's estimates. </P></DIV>
<DIV class=3DarticleColumn1 id=3DarticleColumn1 style=3D"DISPLAY: =
block">
<P>Ewa came to do a job nobody else wanted. She flew to England from =
Poland at=20
the age of 22 to be a carer in a residential home, helping elderly =
people to=20
bathe, dress, eat and go to the toilet. The hours were long and the pay =
low. The=20
work was hard, physically and emotionally: she saw, close up, sickness, =
dementia=20
and incontinence. </P>
<P>Ewa stuck it out. She wrestled with the language and with loneliness, =
finding=20
friends, a flat, and even love with an Englishman - for a while. She =
made a life=20
for herself that she likes. Ewa loves England. But now, after two years =
and so=20
much effort, the way much of England seems to feel about immigrants is =
making=20
people like Ewa want to leave.</P>
<P>"If we are not wanted here, then it makes us want to go," she says =
quietly,=20
speaking for herself and her sister.</P>
<P>The people she knows are nice, but the headlines are not. The Polish =
are=20
stealing jobs, living off benefits and sending the country to hell, a =
raging=20
taxi driver told her. Remembering his anger with a shudder, she says: =
"If that=20
is how people feel then maybe it is time to go to another country."</P>
<P>She was afraid this would happen. The first time we met, in the =
spring of=20
2004, Ewa was working as a waitress in a vegetarian restaurant in Krakow =
but=20
preparing to come to England. "Is it dangerous?" she asked then, after =
seeing=20
angry English people on the television ranting about the "tidal wave" of =

beggars, criminals and scroungers they feared would flood Britain when =
eight=20
former eastern bloc countries joined the EU.</P>
<P>Far more people came than was expected - 600,000, it emerged last =
week - but=20
only a tiny number have claimed benefits. The crime rate has not soared. =
Those=20
who predicted disaster now say unemployment is being driven up and wages =
down.=20
But economists and business leaders praise the new Europeans, who =
contribute=20
about =A32.5bn a year to the economy; and research by the Joseph =
Rowntree=20
Foundation has found that employers prefer hard-working EU migrants to =
the=20
British, who are perceived to be lazier and unwilling to do low-skilled=20
work.</P>
<P>Ewa did not find it dangerous at all. She has made many friends here. =

"English people are lovely." But the angry people she saw on the =
television have=20
a new scare now: the anticipated arrival of Romanians and Bulgarians in =
January.=20
The taxi driver turned on Ewa when he found out where she was from. =
"That was=20
the worst moment in my life," she says. "I felt terrible. He was a =
racist to me,=20
just a nasty guy. He said we should not be here. That was the first time =
I=20
thought 'I might as well go home'."</P>
<P>Now she and her sister, who is teaching here, are discussing what to =
do. "I=20
do feel guilty when I say I am Polish. I feel guilty because I know =
there are so=20
many of us here and not everyone is happy with us. I worry that things =
will get=20
worse."</P>
<P>The Zandman sisters left Poland because they could not find work - =
Ewa is a=20
physiotherapist but was earning less than =A3100 a month in Krakow - and =
they do=20
not want to go back to Poland yet. "It has so many troubles, the =
government is=20
disgraceful: nationalist, full of prejudice. So we are really thinking, =
if we=20
are not wanted here, maybe we should go somewhere else?"</P>
<P>If that feeling is shared by many of her compatriots it will be our =
loss.=20
Reports from Poland suggest Britain got the better part of the EU deal. =
Even=20
cheap flights were out of reach of the poorest, most desperate Poles in =
2004, so=20
those who came had to be highly motivated and willing to do jobs for =
which they=20
were vastly overqualified. "I did not come here to live on benefits. All =
my=20
Polish friends here work really hard, they just want to make a living. =
That=20
should be respected, I think."</P></DIV>
<DIV class=3DarticleColumn2 id=3DarticleColumn2 style=3D"DISPLAY: =
block">
<P>Ewa came with an employment agency, but hundreds of Poles continue to =
turn up=20
at the airports or at Victoria Coach Station every week, with empty =
pockets and=20
heads full of how easy it will be to get work here. Some end up working =
for=20
gangmasters on pitiful wages, paying dearly to live in hovels, or on the =

streets. A London homeless charity has asked for help from a Polish =
counterpart=20
after meeting so many Poles on its soup runs. "Quite a number have been =
sold=20
down the river," said Tim Nicholls of the Simon Community last week, =
"having met=20
unscrupulous people who have put them into forms of slave labour."</P>
<P>Ewa has claimed benefits. "But only for a month, between jobs. I =
could not=20
survive otherwise. I wrote a letter afterwards to say thank you." She is =
not so=20
lonely or homesick these days, despite breaking up with her boyfriend. =
She works=20
in a charity shop in Redhill for not much money, half of which goes on =
the rent=20
of a room in a shared house. It is simply furnished but looks splendid =
to her.=20
"If I was still in Poland I could not afford to live in a room like =
this."</P>
<P>A television was donated by a friend. Her computer is old. But these =
are=20
treasured possessions she could not have in Krakow. "The biggest thing, =
for me,=20
is my camera. It cost =A3100. I could not have afforded it in Poland, no =
way. But=20
this is a very important way I express myself. If you are denied such a =
thing,=20
then life can be empty."</P>
<P>Ewa came to learn the language, see the country and earn some money. =
Her=20
English is good, her walls are decorated with stunning photographs of =
Welsh=20
mountains that she took herself, but money is still a problem. "England =
is=20
expensive, and people here use money they do not have. I have never been =
in debt=20
in my life, but now I have a credit card."</P>
<P>On the night she moved out of her flat in Krakow in 2004, the =
medieval main=20
square was filling with people. They were celebrating Poland joining the =

European Union on 1 May. As a lone trumpeter sounded from a tower high =
above the=20
Rynek Glowny square at midnight, a tearful young man full of honey vodka =
tried=20
to explain what it meant. "Our history begins again. After the Soviet =
years, we=20
are equals at last with all Europeans."</P>
<P>Not yet, it seems. Not while their presence in this country provokes=20
resentment and fear. "It seems we are not seen as equal," says Ewa, =
sadly. "If=20
we were, then people would not say the things they do."</P>
<P>THE FIGURES</P>
<P>26,000 PEOPLE were expected by ministers to come to Britain after 10=20
countries joined the EU on 1 May 2004.</P>
<P>427,000 WORKERS from those countries have registered in the UK since =
that=20
date.</P>
<P>600,000 HAVE COME, says the Home Office, once partners, children and=20
self-employed workers are included.</P>
<P>264,560 POLISH people have arrived in the UK since May 2004.</P>
<P>74,300 IS THE OVERALL INCREASE in immigrants here from the 10 =
accession=20
countries, once the number of departures is subtracted.</P>
<P>350,000 ROMANIANS will come after 1 January, according to their own=20
government's estimates. </P></DIV></DIV></DIV></BODY></HTML>

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