[Hpn] Nowhere to hide in heat

William Charles Tinker wtinker@verizon.net
Wed, 02 Aug 2006 07:49:26 -0400


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3.htm


Wed, Aug. 02, 2006

Nowhere to hide in heat
By Richard Griffis
The Sun News

The Sun News
  a.. Excessive heat warning until 7 p.m.=20
Libby Faulkner glanced into the woods across from the bank she frequents =
and spotted what she suspects was a young homeless couple looking for a =
shady place to rest.

"I can't comprehend how they can stand the heat," said Faulkner, =
executive director of Street Reach Mission, 509 9th Ave. N.

Above-average temperatures blanketed the coastal Carolinas and the =
eastern half of the nation for an eighth consecutive day Tuesday, nearly =
doubling the number of people showing up at Street Reach in an effort to =
escape the heat.

Some showed up Tuesday asking to see the mission's doctor; others =
stopped by for lunch. More than three dozen newcomers will likely spend =
the night, Faulkner said.

"It doesn't matter to me why they are here, as long as they are out of =
the heat," said Faulkner, who anticipates the number of clients growing =
the longer the oppressively hot conditions continue. "We'll keep as many =
as we can get by with without upsetting the fire department too much."

The National Weather Service has issued an excessive heat warning for 11 =
a.m. to 7 p.m. today.

Terry Lebo, a forecaster for the National Weather Service in Wilmington, =
N.C., said temperatures will likely stay in the upper 90s for the next =
two days. A front is expected to drop in from the northwest and stall in =
the area Friday night, bringing with it cooler temperatures and =
widespread afternoon showers over the weekend.

The same heat wave that was blamed for as many as 164 deaths in =
California brought a fifth-straight day of oppressive weather to Chicago =
and promised at least three days of brow-mopping temperatures in the New =
York metropolitan area.

Residents on Chicago's South Side were evacuated from buildings by the =
hundreds after the power went out for 20,000 customers. Illinois =
officials blamed three deaths on the heat. The blistering temperatures =
also scorched Conyers, Ga., where a high school football player died =
after collapsing at practice.

By midafternoon, the temperature in Chicago was 100, Baltimore reached =
99 and Washington hit 97, though the humidity made it feel like 107. In =
New York's Central Park, it was 95; the record for the date was 100, set =
in 1933. The National Weather Service said the mercury could reach 104 =
on Wednesday, and Thursday could be bad, too.

"This is a very dangerous heat wave," Mayor Michael Bloomberg said. =
"It's more than just uncomfortable. It can seriously threaten your =
life."

In Horry County, the heat has prompted Faulkner to allow people to stay =
in the mission immediately after lunch - several hours earlier than =
normal.

"Being out in this heat will drain their energy," Faulkner said.

Further inland, Gwen Woody, executive director of Coastal Rescue Mission =
in Loris, said the current heat wave is just another day for her agency, =
which serves 1,500 clients per month.

"It's an ongoing thing here," said Woody, whose mission has been =
distributing fans to needy, elderly and single-parent clients all =
summer. "It's a way of life here."

So far, the area's hospitals have been unaffected.

"We have not had any appreciable increase in the number of patients that =
we are seeing and treating for heat-related illness symptoms," said =
Rhonda Wilson, spokeswoman for Georgetown Hospital System.

The same is true at Grand Strand Regional Medical Center, Conway Medical =
Center and Brunswick (N.C.) Community Hospital.

"For people who have lived here for a while, they know what precautions =
to take," Grand Strand spokeswoman Joan Carroza said. "They've learned =
how to manage it."

Carroza said those in need of relief from the heat might consider going =
to a library or mall for the afternoon.

Amy Myers, spokeswoman for Brunswick Community Hospital, said it has =
been business as usual in the emergency room there.

"We continue to recommend that people drink plenty of water, stay inside =
and stay as cool as possible," she said.

The Associated Press contributed to this report.

Farmers brace for heat's effects on crops, livestock | 6A


-------------------------------------------------------------------------=
-------

Fast fact

The National Weather Service has issued an excessive-heat warning for 11 =
a.m. to 7 p.m. today.


-------------------------------------------------------------------------=
-------
Contact RICHARD GRIFFIS at 626-0294 or rgriffis@thesunnews.com. 


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<DIV><FONT face=3DArial size=3D2><A=20
href=3D"http://www.myrtlebeachonline.com/mld/myrtlebeachonline/news/local=
/15177803.htm">http://www.myrtlebeachonline.com/mld/myrtlebeachonline/new=
s/local/15177803.htm</A></FONT></DIV>
<DIV>&nbsp;</DIV>
<DIV>&nbsp;</DIV>
<DIV>Wed, Aug. 02, 2006
<DIV class=3Darticle_tools>
<DIV class=3Darticle_tools_container><FONT face=3DArial=20
size=3D2></FONT>&nbsp;</DIV></DIV>
<DIV class=3Ddivclear></DIV>
<H1>Nowhere to hide in heat</H1>
<H5>By Richard Griffis</H5>
<H6>The Sun News</H6>
<DIV id=3Darticle_related>
<DIV class=3Dphotorelated><IMG height=3D200 alt=3D""=20
src=3D"http://www.myrtlebeachonline.com/images/myrtlebeachonline/sunnews/=
15179/230409098235.jpg"=20
width=3D300 border=3D0></DIV>
<DIV class=3Dphotocredit>The Sun News</DIV>
<DIV class=3Dphotocaption></DIV>
<UL>
  <LI><A=20
  =
href=3D"http://weather.myrtlebeachonline.com/US/SC/Myrtle_Beach.html#HEA"=
>Excessive=20
  heat warning until 7 p.m.</A> </LI></UL></DIV><!-- begin body-content =
-->
<P>Libby Faulkner glanced into the woods across from the bank she =
frequents and=20
spotted what she suspects was a young homeless couple looking for a =
shady place=20
to rest.</P>
<P>"I can't comprehend how they can stand the heat," said Faulkner, =
executive=20
director of Street Reach Mission, 509 9th Ave. N.</P>
<P>Above-average temperatures blanketed the coastal Carolinas and the =
eastern=20
half of the nation for an eighth consecutive day Tuesday, nearly =
doubling the=20
number of people showing up at Street Reach in an effort to escape the =
heat.</P>
<P>Some showed up Tuesday asking to see the mission's doctor; others =
stopped by=20
for lunch. More than three dozen newcomers will likely spend the night, =
Faulkner=20
said.</P>
<P>"It doesn't matter to me why they are here, as long as they are out =
of the=20
heat," said Faulkner, who anticipates the number of clients growing the =
longer=20
the oppressively hot conditions continue. "We'll keep as many as we can =
get by=20
with without upsetting the fire department too much."</P>
<P>The National Weather Service has issued an excessive heat warning for =
11 a.m.=20
to 7 p.m. today.</P>
<P>Terry Lebo, a forecaster for the National Weather Service in =
Wilmington,=20
N.C., said temperatures will likely stay in the upper 90s for the next =
two days.=20
A front is expected to drop in from the northwest and stall in the area =
Friday=20
night, bringing with it cooler temperatures and widespread afternoon =
showers=20
over the weekend.</P>
<P>The same heat wave that was blamed for as many as 164 deaths in =
California=20
brought a fifth-straight day of oppressive weather to Chicago and =
promised at=20
least three days of brow-mopping temperatures in the New York =
metropolitan=20
area.</P>
<P>Residents on Chicago's South Side were evacuated from buildings by =
the=20
hundreds after the power went out for 20,000 customers. Illinois =
officials=20
blamed three deaths on the heat. The blistering temperatures also =
scorched=20
Conyers, Ga., where a high school football player died after collapsing =
at=20
practice.</P>
<P>By midafternoon, the temperature in Chicago was 100, Baltimore =
reached 99 and=20
Washington hit 97, though the humidity made it feel like 107. In New =
York's=20
Central Park, it was 95; the record for the date was 100, set in 1933. =
The=20
National Weather Service said the mercury could reach 104 on Wednesday, =
and=20
Thursday could be bad, too.</P>
<P>"This is a very dangerous heat wave," Mayor Michael Bloomberg said. =
"It's=20
more than just uncomfortable. It can seriously threaten your life."</P>
<P>In Horry County, the heat has prompted Faulkner to allow people to =
stay in=20
the mission immediately after lunch - several hours earlier than =
normal.</P>
<P>"Being out in this heat will drain their energy," Faulkner said.</P>
<P>Further inland, Gwen Woody, executive director of Coastal Rescue =
Mission in=20
Loris, said the current heat wave is just another day for her agency, =
which=20
serves 1,500 clients per month.</P>
<P>"It's an ongoing thing here," said Woody, whose mission has been =
distributing=20
fans to needy, elderly and single-parent clients all summer. "It's a way =
of life=20
here."</P>
<P>So far, the area's hospitals have been unaffected.</P>
<P>"We have not had any appreciable increase in the number of patients =
that we=20
are seeing and treating for heat-related illness symptoms," said Rhonda =
Wilson,=20
spokeswoman for Georgetown Hospital System.</P>
<P>The same is true at Grand Strand Regional Medical Center, Conway =
Medical=20
Center and Brunswick (N.C.) Community Hospital.</P>
<P>"For people who have lived here for a while, they know what =
precautions to=20
take," Grand Strand spokeswoman Joan Carroza said. "They've learned how =
to=20
manage it."</P>
<P>Carroza said those in need of relief from the heat might consider =
going to a=20
library or mall for the afternoon.</P>
<P>Amy Myers, spokeswoman for Brunswick Community Hospital, said it has =
been=20
business as usual in the emergency room there.</P>
<P>"We continue to recommend that people drink plenty of water, stay =
inside and=20
stay as cool as possible," she said.</P>
<P><I>The Associated Press contributed to this report.</I></P>
<P><B>Farmers brace for heat's effects on crops, livestock </B>| 6A</P>
<HR class=3Dinfobox-hr-separator color=3D#cccccc SIZE=3D1>

<DIV class=3Dinfobox><B><SPAN class=3Dinfobox-head>Fast =
fact</SPAN></B><BR>
<P>The National Weather Service has issued an excessive-heat warning for =
11 a.m.=20
to 7 p.m. today.</P></DIV><!-- end body-content --><!-- begin body-end =
-->
<DIV class=3Dbody-end>
<DIV class=3Dtagline>
<HR class=3Dtagline color=3D#cccccc SIZE=3D1>
<I><SPAN class=3Dtagline>Contact RICHARD GRIFFIS at 626-0294 or <A=20
href=3D"mailto:rgriffis@thesunnews.com">rgriffis@thesunnews.com</A>.</SPA=
N></I>=20
</DIV></DIV><!-- end body-end --></DIV>

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