Fw: [Hpn] HOMELESS IN PARADISE

Steve Kudlak stevex11@sbcglobal.net
Thu, 02 Jun 2005 08:09:04 -0700


This is a multi-part message in MIME format.
--------------030202080002010304050303
Content-Type: text/plain; charset=ISO-8859-1; format=flowed
Content-Transfer-Encoding: 8bit

I think the person who is sening all those weird emails is just unsure 
of how to use email and mailers and servers and is in some remote place 
and just got access to things and is unsure of what he is doing. Oh well 
I just delete all the extras

I wonder what the goegraphical distribution of people on this list is 
like. I am on the very expensive West Coast and dearest high holy beings 
sometimes it seems like getting to an apartment here is like buying a 
house elsewehre.

Have Fun,
Sends Steve

Have Fun,
Sends Steve


William Charles Tinker wrote:

> Dave Ward et al-
>  
> Thank you very much, I try to be of service,even though I certainly 
> miss Tom Boland guiding this list a lot.
>  
> A Brother In The Struggle
> Bill
>  
> ----- Original Message -----
> *From:* Dave and Deb Ward <mailto:dlwdaw@hotmail.com>
> *To:* William Charles Tinker <mailto:wtinker@metrocast.net> ; 
> hpn@lists.is.asu.edu <mailto:hpn@lists.is.asu.edu> ; 
> owaynat@comcast.net <mailto:owaynat@comcast.net>
> *Sent:* Saturday, May 28, 2005 12:10 AM
> *Subject:* Re: [Hpn] HOMELESS IN PARADISE
>
> Well, I have gotten 4 or 5 emails saying the same dam thing. If you do 
> not want emails from this list, unsubscribe from it. So So far today I 
> have gotten at least 8 emails  from this person. The first set had 
> noting it. The second set had the same thing written.
>  
> Mr. Tinker, you are doing a good job getting information out, keep up 
> the good work.
>  
> Dave Ward
>
>     ----- Original Message -----
>     *From:* owaynat@comcast.net <mailto:owaynat@comcast.net>
>     *To:* William Charles Tinker <mailto:wtinker@metrocast.net> ;
>     hpn@lists.is.asu.edu <mailto:hpn@lists.is.asu.edu>
>     *Sent:* Friday, May 27, 2005 4:59 PM
>     *Subject:* Re: [Hpn] HOMELESS IN PARADISE
>
>     "William Charles Tinker" at wtinker@metrocast.net
>     <mailto:wtinker@metrocast.net> is a very bad person I been pegging
>     himto stop sending me e mails but he kept flodding my mail box ang
>     no matter what I do he manage to get his mails to me
>     Please ask him to leave me alone he is going to cause me HEART ATTACK
>      
>
>         -------------- Original message --------------
>
>         > www.nzherald.co.nz/index.cfm?c_id=1&ObjectID=10127887
>         <http://www.nzherald.co.nz/index.cfm?c_id=1&ObjectID=10127887>
>         >
>         > Sandra Paterson: Homeless in paradise
>         >
>         > 28.05.05
>         >
>         >
>         > I am ashamed to say that until a few weeks ago, I did not
>         know that people
>         > like Leah, Jake and Rawhiri existed.
>         >
>         > Who? Well, exactly. They are homeless people. And in my busy
>         whirlwind of a
>         > world they were invisible.
>         >
>         > I had been to the cafes and shops along the Tauranga
>         harbourside many times
>         > without realising that later, when it was dark and quiet,
>         people curled up
>         > in the doorways to escape the cold.
>         >
>         > I didn't know that in the bushes by the tennis courts there
>         were shelters
>         > made of cardboard. And I had sat in the library and not
>         realised that the
>         > bearded man wit! h the lovely grin who seemed to read most
>         of the day had
>         > nowhere else to go.
>         >
>         > Oh, I knew there were drunks in town. I'd see them sitting
>         on the benches by
>         > the big ash tree and would walk past, not knowing what to
>         say or do, and not
>         > giving it much thought, either.
>         >
>         > I had seen people who were obviously homeless in Auckland
>         and London and
>         > other big cities around the world, but not in the Bay of
>         so-called Plenty,
>         > my slice of paradise.
>         >
>         > So I was somewhat surprised when, in a chance conversation,
>         I learned there
>         > was a whole community of homeless people here.
>         >
>         > Two weeks ago on a Friday night I found myself buttering
>         several loaves of
>         > bread and carrying large flasks of soup into a van and
>         setting out to meet
>         > them.
>         >
>         > In the front were Peter and Karen, a local couple in their
>         late 30s. I have
>         > known them for a while but, li! ke many salt-of-the-earth
>         people, they were
>         > quiet and unassuming and did not go around trumpeting their
>         good deeds.
>         >
>         > When I learned of their work on the streets and said I'd
>         like to write about
>         > it, they were shy and said not to use their surname.
>         >
>         > As we drove downtown Karen scanned the streets for familiar
>         faces. "Be
>         > prepared for anything to happen," she warned. "Sometimes
>         they can be
>         > aggressive."
>         >
>         > That night they weren't. In fact, I was touched by their
>         warmth and gentle
>         > spirits.
>         >
>         > Around midnight, when the temperature dropped and I was
>         shivering, Jake -
>         > who had been telling me how he had lived on the streets for
>         32 years -
>         > fetched his spare jersey and draped it over my knees.
>         >
>         > I asked him about the raw scabs on his hands. "White-tailed
>         spider bites,"
>         > he said. Who took him to hospital? Peter and Karen.
>         >
>         > ! Later in the night a young woman turned up, her face
>         shining despite the
>         > scars of a violent past. In her arms was a five-day-old baby
>         - her ninth
>         > child, she told me. The others had been removed by social
>         welfare, but she
>         > really wanted to keep this one.
>         >
>         > Thanks to Peter and Karen she may be able to do so. They
>         helped her to get
>         > off the streets in the last months of pregnancy and to find
>         accommodation,
>         > and it was Karen who supported her through the long hours of
>         labour.
>         >
>         > "They help us lots, eh?" grinned Rawhiri, a tall young man
>         in a baseball
>         > cap. He starts a drug and rehabilitation programme in a few
>         weeks and
>         > credits Peter and Karen for inspiring him. "I'm ready to
>         change my life
>         > now."
>         >
>         > Homeless people do not need more money. Most of them are on
>         some sort of
>         > benefit, most of which goes on alcohol. It keeps them warm,
>         dulls the
>         > gnawing h! unger and numbs whatever pain led them onto the
>         streets in the
>         > first place.
>         >
>         > "What they need is love, not a faceless handout," says Karen
>         simply. "They
>         > need someone to get to know them and to believe in them. We
>         tell them they
>         > have value and that they are worth more than this. You have
>         to meet
>         > emotional and spiritual needs as well as physical."
>         >
>         > I got home at 2am, in awe of people who give their lives for
>         others so
>         > selflessly.
>         >
>         > Karen and Peter live on a fairly small income and have four
>         children of
>         > their own. (The eldest two, in their teens, look after the
>         younger ones when
>         > their parents are out.) The work they do with the homeless
>         is in their own
>         > time; and they pay for the bread and soup, and medicine when
>         necessary, out
>         > of their own pockets.
>         >
>         > They have big dreams of having enough financial support to
>         work on the
>         > stree! ts full time; and of setting up an overnight shelter
>         and a family-based
>         > halfway house for those who really want to change.
>         >
>         > In the meantime, though, as the nights get colder they need
>         sleeping bags.
>         > And they would like the council workers and police - or
>         whoever it is - to
>         > stop removing the blankets and belongings they find stashed
>         in trees and
>         > bushes.
>         >
>         > "It might not be pretty, having homeless people in your
>         town, but these
>         > people are human and they deserve to be warm at night."
>         >
>         > They are simple requests: sleeping bags, support from the
>         local authorities,
>         > money to buy soup and bread; and a decent income so they can
>         carry on the
>         > work they are so passionate about.
>         >
>         > Volunteers like these are vital to society, yet as life gets
>         faster and
>         > two-income lifestyles more common, fewer and fewer people
>         are willing or
>         > able to give their time! . Those who do deserve support and
>         recognition.
>         >
>         > * Sandra Paterson is a Mt Maunganui journalist.
>         >
>         >
>         > Copyright  2005, APN Holdings NZ Ltd Privacy Policy
>         > 
>


--------------030202080002010304050303
Content-Type: text/html; charset=ISO-8859-1
Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit

<!DOCTYPE html PUBLIC "-//W3C//DTD HTML 4.01 Transitional//EN">
<html>
<head>
  <meta content="text/html;charset=ISO-8859-1" http-equiv="Content-Type">
</head>
<body bgcolor="#ffffff" text="#000000">
I think the person who is sening all those weird emails is just unsure
of how to use email and mailers and servers and is in some remote place
and just got access to things and is unsure of what he is doing. Oh
well I just delete all the extras<br>
<br>
I wonder what the goegraphical distribution of people on this list is
like. I am on the very expensive West Coast and dearest high holy
beings sometimes it seems like getting to an apartment here is like
buying a house elsewehre.<br>
<br>
Have Fun,<br>
Sends Steve<br>
<br>
Have Fun,<br>
Sends Steve<br>
<br>
<br>
William Charles Tinker wrote:
<blockquote cite="mid001e01c56322$6c959f30$30baaf41@new7fbpweklelv"
 type="cite">
  <meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html;charset=iso-8859-1">
  <style></style>
  <meta content="MSHTML 6.00.2900.2627" name="GENERATOR">
  <div><font face="Arial">Dave Ward et al-</font></div>
  <div>&nbsp;</div>
  <div><font face="Arial">Thank you very much,&nbsp;I try to be of
service,even though I certainly miss Tom Boland guiding this list a lot.</font></div>
  <div>&nbsp;</div>
  <div><font face="Arial">A Brother In The Struggle</font></div>
  <div><font face="Arial">Bill</font></div>
  <div>&nbsp;</div>
  <div
 style="font-family: arial; font-style: normal; font-variant: normal; font-weight: normal; font-size: 10pt; line-height: normal; font-size-adjust: none; font-stretch: normal;">-----
Original Message -----
  <div
 style="background: rgb(228, 228, 228) none repeat scroll 0%; -moz-background-clip: initial; -moz-background-origin: initial; -moz-background-inline-policy: initial;"><b>From:</b>
  <a title="dlwdaw@hotmail.com" href="mailto:dlwdaw@hotmail.com">Dave
and Deb Ward</a> </div>
  <div><b>To:</b> <a title="wtinker@metrocast.net"
 href="mailto:wtinker@metrocast.net">William Charles Tinker</a> ; <a
 title="hpn@lists.is.asu.edu" href="mailto:hpn@lists.is.asu.edu">hpn@lists.is.asu.edu</a>
; <a title="owaynat@comcast.net" href="mailto:owaynat@comcast.net">owaynat@comcast.net</a>
  </div>
  <div><b>Sent:</b> Saturday, May 28, 2005 12:10 AM</div>
  <div><b>Subject:</b> Re: [Hpn] HOMELESS IN PARADISE</div>
  </div>
  <div><br>
  </div>
<!--[gte IE 5]><?xml:namespace prefix="v" /><?xml:namespace prefix="o" /><![endif]-->
  <div>
  <div>Well, I have gotten 4 or 5 emails saying the same dam thing. If
you do not want emails from this list, unsubscribe from it. So So far
today I have gotten at least 8 emails&nbsp; from this person. The first set
had noting it. The second set had the same thing written.</div>
  <div>&nbsp;</div>
  <div>Mr. Tinker, you are doing a good job getting information out,
keep up the good work.</div>
  <div>&nbsp;</div>
  <div>Dave Ward</div>
  <blockquote
 style="border-left: 2px solid rgb(0, 0, 0); padding-right: 0px; padding-left: 5px; margin-left: 5px; margin-right: 0px;"
 dir="ltr">
    <div
 style="font-family: arial; font-style: normal; font-variant: normal; font-weight: normal; font-size: 10pt; line-height: normal; font-size-adjust: none; font-stretch: normal;">-----
Original Message ----- </div>
    <div
 style="font-family: arial; font-style: normal; font-variant: normal; font-weight: normal; font-size: 10pt; line-height: normal; font-size-adjust: none; font-stretch: normal;"><b>From:</b>
    <a title="mailto:owaynat@comcast.net"
 href="mailto:owaynat@comcast.net">owaynat@comcast.net</a> </div>
    <div
 style="font-family: arial; font-style: normal; font-variant: normal; font-weight: normal; font-size: 10pt; line-height: normal; font-size-adjust: none; font-stretch: normal;"><b>To:</b>
    <a title="mailto:wtinker@metrocast.net"
 href="mailto:wtinker@metrocast.net">William Charles Tinker</a> ; <a
 title="mailto:hpn@lists.is.asu.edu" href="mailto:hpn@lists.is.asu.edu">hpn@lists.is.asu.edu</a>
    </div>
    <div
 style="font-family: arial; font-style: normal; font-variant: normal; font-weight: normal; font-size: 10pt; line-height: normal; font-size-adjust: none; font-stretch: normal;"><b>Sent:</b>
Friday, May 27, 2005 4:59 PM</div>
    <div
 style="font-family: arial; font-style: normal; font-variant: normal; font-weight: normal; font-size: 10pt; line-height: normal; font-size-adjust: none; font-stretch: normal;"><b>Subject:</b>
Re: [Hpn] HOMELESS IN PARADISE</div>
    <div><br>
    </div>
    <div>
    <div>"William Charles Tinker" at <a
 title="mailto:wtinker@metrocast.net"
 href="mailto:wtinker@metrocast.net" target="_blank">wtinker@metrocast.net</a>&nbsp;is
a very bad person I been pegging himto stop sending me e mails but he
kept flodding my mail box ang no matter what I do he manage to get his
mails to me</div>
    <div>Please ask him to leave me alone he is going to cause me HEART
ATTACK</div>
    </div>
    <div>&nbsp;</div>
    <blockquote
 style="border-left: 2px solid rgb(16, 16, 255); padding-left: 5px; margin-left: 5px;">--------------
Original message -------------- <br>
      <br>
&gt; <a
 title="http://www.nzherald.co.nz/index.cfm?c_id=1&amp;ObjectID=10127887"
 href="http://www.nzherald.co.nz/index.cfm?c_id=1&amp;ObjectID=10127887">www.nzherald.co.nz/index.cfm?c_id=1&amp;ObjectID=10127887</a>
      <br>
&gt; <br>
&gt; Sandra Paterson: Homeless in paradise <br>
&gt; <br>
&gt; 28.05.05 <br>
&gt; <br>
&gt; <br>
&gt; I am ashamed to say that until a few weeks ago, I did not know
that people <br>
&gt; like Leah, Jake and Rawhiri existed. <br>
&gt; <br>
&gt; Who? Well, exactly. They are homeless people. And in my busy
whirlwind of a <br>
&gt; world they were invisible. <br>
&gt; <br>
&gt; I had been to the cafes and shops along the Tauranga harbourside
many times <br>
&gt; without realising that later, when it was dark and quiet, people
curled up <br>
&gt; in the doorways to escape the cold. <br>
&gt; <br>
&gt; I didn't know that in the bushes by the tennis courts there were
shelters <br>
&gt; made of cardboard. And I had sat in the library and not realised
that the <br>
&gt; bearded man wit! h the lovely grin who seemed to read most of the
day had <br>
&gt; nowhere else to go. <br>
&gt; <br>
&gt; Oh, I knew there were drunks in town. I'd see them sitting on the
benches by <br>
&gt; the big ash tree and would walk past, not knowing what to say or
do, and not <br>
&gt; giving it much thought, either. <br>
&gt; <br>
&gt; I had seen people who were obviously homeless in Auckland and
London and <br>
&gt; other big cities around the world, but not in the Bay of so-called
Plenty, <br>
&gt; my slice of paradise. <br>
&gt; <br>
&gt; So I was somewhat surprised when, in a chance conversation, I
learned there <br>
&gt; was a whole community of homeless people here. <br>
&gt; <br>
&gt; Two weeks ago on a Friday night I found myself buttering several
loaves of <br>
&gt; bread and carrying large flasks of soup into a van and setting out
to meet <br>
&gt; them. <br>
&gt; <br>
&gt; In the front were Peter and Karen, a local couple in their late
30s. I have <br>
&gt; known them for a while but, li! ke many salt-of-the-earth people,
they were <br>
&gt; quiet and unassuming and did not go around trumpeting their good
deeds. <br>
&gt; <br>
&gt; When I learned of their work on the streets and said I'd like to
write about <br>
&gt; it, they were shy and said not to use their surname. <br>
&gt; <br>
&gt; As we drove downtown Karen scanned the streets for familiar faces.
"Be <br>
&gt; prepared for anything to happen," she warned. "Sometimes they can
be <br>
&gt; aggressive." <br>
&gt; <br>
&gt; That night they weren't. In fact, I was touched by their warmth
and gentle <br>
&gt; spirits. <br>
&gt; <br>
&gt; Around midnight, when the temperature dropped and I was shivering,
Jake - <br>
&gt; who had been telling me how he had lived on the streets for 32
years - <br>
&gt; fetched his spare jersey and draped it over my knees. <br>
&gt; <br>
&gt; I asked him about the raw scabs on his hands. "White-tailed spider
bites," <br>
&gt; he said. Who took him to hospital? Peter and Karen. <br>
&gt; <br>
&gt; ! Later in the night a young woman turned up, her face shining
despite the <br>
&gt; scars of a violent past. In her arms was a five-day-old baby - her
ninth <br>
&gt; child, she told me. The others had been removed by social welfare,
but she <br>
&gt; really wanted to keep this one. <br>
&gt; <br>
&gt; Thanks to Peter and Karen she may be able to do so. They helped
her to get <br>
&gt; off the streets in the last months of pregnancy and to find
accommodation, <br>
&gt; and it was Karen who supported her through the long hours of
labour. <br>
&gt; <br>
&gt; "They help us lots, eh?" grinned Rawhiri, a tall young man in a
baseball <br>
&gt; cap. He starts a drug and rehabilitation programme in a few weeks
and <br>
&gt; credits Peter and Karen for inspiring him. "I'm ready to change my
life <br>
&gt; now." <br>
&gt; <br>
&gt; Homeless people do not need more money. Most of them are on some
sort of <br>
&gt; benefit, most of which goes on alcohol. It keeps them warm, dulls
the <br>
&gt; gnawing h! unger and numbs whatever pain led them onto the streets
in the <br>
&gt; first place. <br>
&gt; <br>
&gt; "What they need is love, not a faceless handout," says Karen
simply. "They <br>
&gt; need someone to get to know them and to believe in them. We tell
them they <br>
&gt; have value and that they are worth more than this. You have to
meet <br>
&gt; emotional and spiritual needs as well as physical." <br>
&gt; <br>
&gt; I got home at 2am, in awe of people who give their lives for
others so <br>
&gt; selflessly. <br>
&gt; <br>
&gt; Karen and Peter live on a fairly small income and have four
children of <br>
&gt; their own. (The eldest two, in their teens, look after the younger
ones when <br>
&gt; their parents are out.) The work they do with the homeless is in
their own <br>
&gt; time; and they pay for the bread and soup, and medicine when
necessary, out <br>
&gt; of their own pockets. <br>
&gt; <br>
&gt; They have big dreams of having enough financial support to work on
the <br>
&gt; stree! ts full time; and of setting up an overnight shelter and a
family-based <br>
&gt; halfway house for those who really want to change. <br>
&gt; <br>
&gt; In the meantime, though, as the nights get colder they need
sleeping bags. <br>
&gt; And they would like the council workers and police - or whoever it
is - to <br>
&gt; stop removing the blankets and belongings they find stashed in
trees and <br>
&gt; bushes. <br>
&gt; <br>
&gt; "It might not be pretty, having homeless people in your town, but
these <br>
&gt; people are human and they deserve to be warm at night." <br>
&gt; <br>
&gt; They are simple requests: sleeping bags, support from the local
authorities, <br>
&gt; money to buy soup and bread; and a decent income so they can carry
on the <br>
&gt; work they are so passionate about. <br>
&gt; <br>
&gt; Volunteers like these are vital to society, yet as life gets
faster and <br>
&gt; two-income lifestyles more common, fewer and fewer people are
willing or <br>
&gt; able to give their time! . Those who do deserve support and
recognition. <br>
&gt; <br>
&gt; * Sandra Paterson is a Mt Maunganui journalist. <br>
&gt; <br>
&gt; <br>
&gt; Copyright &copy; 2005, APN Holdings NZ Ltd Privacy Policy <br>
&gt; </blockquote>
  </blockquote>
  </div>
</blockquote>
<br>
</body>
</html>

--------------030202080002010304050303--