[Hpn] I wonder

David and Deb Ward dlwdaw@bellatlantic.net
Sat, 20 Jan 2001 22:25:53 -0500


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    I really don't have a problem with them taking the baby. the mother
didn't have a stable living arrangement. According to the article from
what i have read, the mother has had a few problems keeping a roof over
her head. I also don't think that the that the kid was taken as a form
of harassment towards a homeless mother.

Dave Ward

homey wrote:

> DCYF removes baby from homeless family aided by the police
> [Image]The DCYF took custody of the four-month-old baby once before
> after the 18-year-old mother, Jennifer Curry, was thrown out of a home
> for pregnant teens.
>
> By GERALD M. CARBONE
> Journal Staff Writer
>
> PROVIDENCE -- A homeless family who police rescued from bitterly cold
> conditions last week has been broken up, after the Department of
> Children, Youth and Families received reports that the family's infant
> daughter was a victim of neglect.
>
> The parents of four-month-old Haley Rose Paiva-Curry said yesterday
> that the DCYF took their daughter last Thursday, the day that the
> Providence Journal published a Page One story about the Police
> Department's heartwarming response to the homeless family's problems.
>
> "I can confirm that the four-month-old was placed in non-relative
> foster care because of the risk of harm that the child had been in
> when in the care of her mother," said Edward O'Donnell, chief
> investigator for the DCYF.
>
> Police pooled their money to buy gasoline, sandwiches, and baby
> formula for the family last week, after the father flagged down
> Officer William O'Donnell for help. It was near midnight Wednesday
> when O'Donnell noticed the mother, coatless and cold in the passenger
> seat, and the baby bundled in the back. The car was out of gas in
> Kennedy Plaza, and the family had no place to go.
>
> The baby's parents -- Jennifer Curry, 18, and Daniel Paiva, 22 -- said
> that they drove to a Warwick homeless shelter on Thursday afternoon;
> that night a DCYF caseworker arrived at the shelter and took their
> daughter from her playpen.
>
> The caseworker "said that she'd had two calls for neglect," Curry
> said. The DCYF had taken custody of the baby before, Curry said,
> though she denied that she has ever neglected her daughter.
>
> "She's always been fed," Curry said yesterday in an interview at the
> Providence Journal. "She's always clean."
>
> Curry was 17 when Haley Rose was born on Sept. 6; the DCYF took
> custody of the baby on Sept. 23, after Curry was thrown out of a home
> for pregnant teens for arguing with a woman there. "I lightly shoved
> [the woman] out of my face and I was kicked out," Curry said. The DCYF
> took the baby from Curry's mother's house that night.
>
> The Family Court returned the baby to her in October, Curry said, and
> she took the baby to her mother's house in Pawtucket.
>
> "The last time they took her, she really didn't know me when I got her
> back," Curry said. "She was just getting to know me again. She was
> holding her own bottle and everything."
>
> Curry said that she has had a volatile relationship with her mother
> since she was 12, and that she once spent time in the Training School
> for assaulting her mother with a knife. Since juvenile records are
> confidential, this could not be confirmed.
>
> On New Year's Eve, Curry argued with her mother and left with Paiva
> and their baby. Paiva, who grew up in West Warwick, said that he
> receives disability payments of $320 per month for a mental illness;
> Curry receives $449 per month from welfare, plus $143 for food stamps.
>
> The couple pooled their checks and pawned a diamond ring that Paiva
> had bought Curry, raising enough money to spend a week in an East
> Providence motel. Last Wednesday they ran out of money and checked
> into the Welcome Arnold Shelter in Cranston; but when staffers there
> tried to make them sleep seperately, they left.
>
> The couple were driving from the Cranston shelter to Travelers Aid
> when their car broke down and police came to the rescue. The story of
> how police fed them and fueled their car prompted donations of
> diapers, clothing, infant formula, and cash, though the couple have
> not yet received any of the money sent to Travelers Aid in their care.
>
> "I would like to publicly commend the Police Department for reaching
> out and helping a family in need," O'Donnell said.
>
> On Thursday night, a DCYF caseworker arrived at the Warwick shelter
> with a police officer, asking to see Haley Rose. "I said, 'No, you're
> not going to see my daughter,' " Curry recalled. "You ain't seeing
> nobody."
>
> The caseworker persisted, and she left cradling the sleeping Haley
> Rose in her arms.
>
> "If the cop wasn't standing there, honestly, I would've punched her in
> the face," Curry said.
>
> Curry and Paiva said that they are scheduled to receive their welfare
> and disability checks next week, and they have interviews for jobs at
> a Warwick Burger King. They plan to use their Travelers Aid account to
> move from the Warwick shelter to an apartment of their own.
>
> Paiva said that his long-range plans call for "having some more kids."
>
>

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    I really don't have a problem with them taking the baby.
the mother didn't have a stable living arrangement. According to the article
from what i have read, the mother has had a few problems keeping a roof
over her head. I also don't think that the that the kid was taken as a
form of harassment towards a homeless mother.

Dave Ward

homey wrote:

DCYF removes baby from homeless family aided by the police 
The DCYF took custody of the four-month-old baby once before after the 18-year-old mother, Jennifer Curry, was thrown out of a home for pregnant teens.

By GERALD M. CARBONE
Journal Staff Writer

PROVIDENCE -- A homeless family who police rescued from bitterly cold conditions last week has been broken up, after the Department of Children, Youth and Families received reports that the family's infant daughter was a victim of neglect.

The parents of four-month-old Haley Rose Paiva-Curry said yesterday that the DCYF took their daughter last Thursday, the day that the Providence Journal published a Page One story about the Police Department's heartwarming response to the homeless family's problems.

"I can confirm that the four-month-old was placed in non-relative foster care because of the risk of harm that the child had been in when in the care of her mother," said Edward O'Donnell, chief investigator for the DCYF.

Police pooled their money to buy gasoline, sandwiches, and baby formula for the family last week, after the father flagged down Officer William O'Donnell for help. It was near midnight Wednesday when O'Donnell noticed the mother, coatless and cold in the passenger seat, and the baby bundled in the back. The car was out of gas in Kennedy Plaza, and the family had no place to go.

The baby's parents -- Jennifer Curry, 18, and Daniel Paiva, 22 -- said that they drove to a Warwick homeless shelter on Thursday afternoon; that night a DCYF caseworker arrived at the shelter and took their daughter from her playpen.

The caseworker "said that she'd had two calls for neglect," Curry said. The DCYF had taken custody of the baby before, Curry said, though she denied that she has ever neglected her daughter.

"She's always been fed," Curry said yesterday in an interview at the Providence Journal. "She's always clean."

Curry was 17 when Haley Rose was born on Sept. 6; the DCYF took custody of the baby on Sept. 23, after Curry was thrown out of a home for pregnant teens for arguing with a woman there. "I lightly shoved [the woman] out of my face and I was kicked out," Curry said. The DCYF took the baby from Curry's mother's house that night.

The Family Court returned the baby to her in October, Curry said, and she took the baby to her mother's house in Pawtucket.

"The last time they took her, she really didn't know me when I got her back," Curry said. "She was just getting to know me again. She was holding her own bottle and everything."

Curry said that she has had a volatile relationship with her mother since she was 12, and that she once spent time in the Training School for assaulting her mother with a knife. Since juvenile records are confidential, this could not be confirmed.

On New Year's Eve, Curry argued with her mother and left with Paiva and their baby. Paiva, who grew up in West Warwick, said that he receives disability payments of $320 per month for a mental illness; Curry receives $449 per month from welfare, plus $143 for food stamps.

The couple pooled their checks and pawned a diamond ring that Paiva had bought Curry, raising enough money to spend a week in an East Providence motel. Last Wednesday they ran out of money and checked into the Welcome Arnold Shelter in Cranston; but when staffers there tried to make them sleep seperately, they left.

The couple were driving from the Cranston shelter to Travelers Aid when their car broke down and police came to the rescue. The story of how police fed them and fueled their car prompted donations of diapers, clothing, infant formula, and cash, though the couple have not yet received any of the money sent to Travelers Aid in their care.

"I would like to publicly commend the Police Department for reaching out and helping a family in need," O'Donnell said.

On Thursday night, a DCYF caseworker arrived at the Warwick shelter with a police officer, asking to see Haley Rose. "I said, 'No, you're not going to see my daughter,' " Curry recalled. "You ain't seeing nobody."

The caseworker persisted, and she left cradling the sleeping Haley Rose in her arms.

"If the cop wasn't standing there, honestly, I would've punched her in the face," Curry said.

Curry and Paiva said that they are scheduled to receive their welfare and disability checks next week, and they have interviews for jobs at a Warwick Burger King. They plan to use their Travelers Aid account to move from the Warwick shelter to an apartment of their own.

Paiva said that his long-range plans call for "having some more kids."
 

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