[Hpn] FW: Cold Drives More Men Into City Shelter

coh coh@sfo.com
Fri, 19 Jan 2001 18:47:02 -0700


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From: DaytonBear@aol.com
Date: Fri, 19 Jan 2001 13:38:01 EST
To: undisclosed-recipients:;
Subject: Cold Drives More Men Into City Shelter

Albuquerque (NM) Journal

Saturday, December 9, 2000

Cold Drives More Men Into City Shelter

By Lloyd Jojola=20
Journal Staff Writer

   If November was any gauge, some homeless services providers could be
seeing more activity this winter.

   Albuquerque Rescue Mission officials report seeing a noticeable jump las=
t
month in the number of homeless people staying at the 200-bed emergency
overnight shelter at the State Fairgrounds.

   The shelter is open from Nov. 1 to March 15. One week after it opened,
more than 100 people used the shelter, an amount that usually isn't seen
until December. By the third week, the number topped 140 for four
consecutive=20
nights, a mark that's not typically hit until January, Mark Fairchild, the
executive director of the mission, said.

   "We've seen mild increases in previous years, but nothing this dramatic,=
"
Fairchild said in an interview.

   Shelter managers typically see the numbers at the emergency shelter peak
in early January and February, he said.

   Homeless men gather each night at 7 at the Albuquerque Rescue Mission
Downtown to be transported to the shelter at the fairgrounds. They are
transported back to the mission at 5:30 a.m.

   The increase in activity at the emergency shelter is being attributed
primarily to unusually cold weather, Fairchild said.

   Albuquerque's mean temperature for November was 39.4 degrees, according
to the National Weather Service. By comparison, the average city temperatur=
e
for the same period last year was about 50 degrees.

   "You have to go back to the 1930s to find (a November) as cool as that,"
National Weather Service Meteorologist Roy Pennington said.

   The Albuquerque Rescue Mission, which also houses people at its Downtown
location, has seen an overall 20 percent increase in the number of lodgings
provided this year, Fairchild said.

   "It puts additional pressure on our budget," he said.

   "We served 14,000 meals for the month of November, which is more than
we've ever served in our history."

   Some other organizations that provide homeless shelter are not seeing
increases as large as Albuquerque Rescue Mission.

   "We are seeing our yearly, regular increase, but it's not significant,"
said Jeremy Reynalds, the executive director of Joy Junction on Second SW.

   Joy Junction provides shelter mainly for women and families and offers
other services to homeless people. On Monday night, about 129 of the 150
available beds at Joy Junction were filled, Reynalds said.

   One reason some homeless people don't use shelters like Joy Junction is
because of more strict house rules, he said.

   Good Shepherd Center, on Iron SW, provides 52 dorm beds to homeless
people and also opens up its dining room area to accommodate 25 bed rolls,
said Bill Osmanski, director of ministry.

   "Very seldom do we have an empty bed in the wintertime," Osmanski said.

   Despite the high numbers being seen at the fairgrounds shelter, it is
likely the number of beds there will be sufficient throughout the winter to
accommodate those men seeking shelter, Fairchild said.

   But Albuquerque Rescue Mission is asking the community for some help. Th=
e
mission is in need of non-perishable food items and winter clothing for men=
,
women and children. It also is asking for blankets, sleeping bags and
quilts.=20
The organization also accepts tax-deductible cash contributions. Donations
can be dropped off at Albuquerque Rescue Mission, at 525 Second SW. For mor=
e
information call 346-4673.


Copyright 2000 Albuquerque Journal
Copyright =A9 1997 - 2000 Albuquerque Journal


--=20
END FORWARD

**In accordance with Title 17 U.S.C. section 107,
this material is distributed without charge or profit
to those who have expressed a prior
interest in receiving this type of information for
non-profit research and educational purposes only.**

***********************************************************
9000+ articles by or via homeless & ex-homeless people
Year 2000 posts
INFO & to join/leave list - Tom Boland
<wgcp@earthlink.net>
Nothing About Us Without Us -
Democratize Public Policy
***********************************************************
--
STREET SHEET
A Publication of the Coalition on Homelessness, San Francisco
468 Turk Street
San Francisco, CA 94102
415 / 346.3740 - voice
415 / 775.5639 - fax
streetsheet@sf-homeless-coalition.org
http://www.sf-homeless-coalition.org



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FW: Cold Drives More Men Into City Shelter



----------
From: DaytonBear@aol.com
Date: Fri, 19 Jan 2001 13:38:01 EST
To: undisclosed-recipients:;
Subject: Cold Drives More Men Into City Shelter

Albuquerque (NM) Journal

Saturday, December 9, 2000

Cold Drives More Men Into City Shelter


By Lloyd Jojola
Journal Staff Writer

   If November was any gauge, some homeless services provid= ers could be
seeing more activity this winter.

   Albuquerque Rescue Mission officials report seeing a not= iceable jump last
month in the number of homeless people staying at the 200-bed emergency overnight shelter at the State Fairgrounds.

   The shelter is open from Nov. 1 to March 15. One week af= ter it opened,
more than 100 people used the shelter, an amount that usually isn't seen until December. By the third week, the number topped 140 for four consecuti= ve
nights, a mark that's not typically hit until January, Mark Fairchild, the =
executive director of the mission, said.

   "We've seen mild increases in previous years, but n= othing this dramatic,"
Fairchild said in an interview.

   Shelter managers typically see the numbers at the emerge= ncy shelter peak
in early January and February, he said.

   Homeless men gather each night at 7 at the Albuquerque R= escue Mission
Downtown to be transported to the shelter at the fairgrounds. They are
transported back to the mission at 5:30 a.m.

   The increase in activity at the emergency shelter is bei= ng attributed
primarily to unusually cold weather, Fairchild said.

   Albuquerque's mean temperature for November was 39.4 deg= rees, according
to the National Weather Service. By comparison, the average city temperatur= e
for the same period last year was about 50 degrees.

   "You have to go back to the 1930s to find (a Novemb= er) as cool as that,"
National Weather Service Meteorologist Roy Pennington said.

   The Albuquerque Rescue Mission, which also houses people= at its Downtown
location, has seen an overall 20 percent increase in the number of lodgings=
provided this year, Fairchild said.

   "It puts additional pressure on our budget," h= e said.

   "We served 14,000 meals for the month of November, = which is more than
we've ever served in our history."

   Some other organizations that provide homeless shelter a= re not seeing
increases as large as Albuquerque Rescue Mission.

   "We are seeing our yearly, regular increase, but it= 's not significant,"
said Jeremy Reynalds, the executive director of Joy Junction on Second SW. =

   Joy Junction provides shelter mainly for women and famil= ies and offers
other services to homeless people. On Monday night, about 129 of the 150 available beds at Joy Junction were filled, Reynalds said.

   One reason some homeless people don't use shelters like = Joy Junction is
because of more strict house rules, he said.

   Good Shepherd Center, on Iron SW, provides 52 dorm beds = to homeless
people and also opens up its dining room area to accommodate 25 bed rolls, =
said Bill Osmanski, director of ministry.

   "Very seldom do we have an empty bed in the wintert= ime," Osmanski said.

   Despite the high numbers being seen at the fairgrounds s= helter, it is
likely the number of beds there will be sufficient throughout the winter to=
accommodate those men seeking shelter, Fairchild said.

   But Albuquerque Rescue Mission is asking the community f= or some help. The
mission is in need of non-perishable food items and winter clothing for men= ,
women and children. It also is asking for blankets, sleeping bags and quilt= s.
The organization also accepts tax-deductible cash contributions. Donations =
can be dropped off at Albuquerque Rescue Mission, at 525 Second SW. For mor= e
information call 346-4673.


Copyright 2000 Albuquerque Journal
Copyright =A9 1997 - 2000 Albuquerque Journal


--
END FORWARD

**In accordance with Title 17 U.S.C. section 107,
this material is distributed without charge or profit
to those who have expressed a prior
interest in receiving this type of information for
non-profit research and educational purposes only.**

***********************************************************
9000+ articles by or via homeless & ex-homeless people
Year 2000 posts
INFO & to join/leave list - Tom Boland
<wgcp@earthlink.net>
Nothing About Us Without Us -
Democratize Public Policy
***********************************************************
--
STREET SHEET
A Publication of the Coalition on Homelessness, San Francisco
468 Turk Street
San Francisco, CA 94102
415 / 346.3740 - voice
415 / 775.5639 - fax
streetsheet@sf-homeless-coalition.org
http://www.sf-homeless-coalition.org

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