[Hpn] FW: CA: Families, Working Poor Flock To Homeless Shelters This Winter Winter

chance martin streetsheet@sf-homeless-coalition.org
Fri, 19 Jan 2001 18:45:28 -0700


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From: DaytonBear@aol.com
Date: Fri, 19 Jan 2001 13:37:12 EST
To: undisclosed-recipients:;
Subject: CA: Families, Working Poor Flock To Homeless Shelters This Winter


Santa Rosa (CA) Press Democrat

Families, Working Poor Flock To Homeless Shelters This Winter

December 6, 2000=20

By MARIA BROSNAN LIEBEL
THE PRESS DEMOCRAT=20

Sonoma County's robust economy has not been kind to the jobless and working
poor who are struggling to find affordable housing in the face of rising
rents.=20

John Records, executive director of the Committee on the Shelterless, also
known as COTS, said the 35-bed family shelter is full and the adult winter
shelter at the Petaluma Swim Center is close to capacity early in the
season.=20

Records said the family shelter on Petaluma Boulevard South is turning away
record numbers of families for lack of space.

"On average, we turn away twice as many families as we have room for," he
said.=20

Even working families are homeless, caught in the squeeze of rising rents,
Records said.=20

Cold, rainy weather prompted the seasonal shelter for adults to open a
couple=20
of days early this year, Oct. 30 instead of the customary Nov. 1.

"Our census is in the 40s now, which is probably a little high for this tim=
e
of year," Records said of the winter shelter, which sleeps about 54,
including two staff members.

When the shelter fills up, people are given bus tickets to go to a larger
shelter in Santa Rosa, Records said.

Winter shelter guests must be members in good standing of the Petaluma
Opportunity Center on Payran Street, which offers daytime services and
programs to the homeless.

Priority is given to those members who have made the strongest commitment t=
o
improving their lives within the Stepping Stones program, Records said.

Stepping Stones offers different levels of service for members who agree to
certain criteria, such as attending classes and drug testing.

The sick also have priority.

"There are people who are shockingly ill who are on the street" with
serious,=20
incurable problems, Records said.

People with heart conditions, colostomies and amputated toes are among thos=
e
served by the Opportunity Center this year.

Everyone is tested for tuberculosis. Petaluma Valley Hospital and the
Petaluma Health Care District offer on-site medical visits, Records said.

Winter shelter guests sleep on mattresses on the floor of two locker rooms.
Some rest in the shower stalls that are slightly divided and offer more
privacy.=20

About 25 percent of the shelter guests are female, a higher percentage than
that at most winter adult shelters. Records believes women feel safe there
because the leadership of the program and the winter shelter are female.

The budget for operating the winter shelter this year is $60,000 in cash,
plus in-kind donations and free rental of the city-owned Swim Center.

Records said the shelter is seeking donations.

One important need is for volunteers to provide hot meals for about 50
people=20
on Monday nights. Records said individuals, churches and community-service
groups can make one dish or an entire meal. To help with food, call Mary
Isaak at 762-8097.=20

Blankets, sheets and pillowcases also are needed. Donors may contact
Michelle=20
Baynes at 765-6798 or e-mail her at Michelle@cots-homeless.org.


Copyright =A9 2000 The Press Democrat


--=20
END FORWARD

**In accordance with Title 17 U.S.C. section 107,
this material is distributed without charge or profit
to those who have expressed a prior
interest in receiving this type of information for
non-profit research and educational purposes only.**

***********************************************************
9000+ articles by or via homeless & ex-homeless people
Year 2000 posts
INFO & to join/leave list - Tom Boland
<wgcp@earthlink.net>
Nothing About Us Without Us -
Democratize Public Policy
***********************************************************
--
STREET SHEET
A Publication of the Coalition on Homelessness, San Francisco
468 Turk Street
San Francisco, CA 94102
415 / 346.3740 - voice
415 / 775.5639 - fax
streetsheet@sf-homeless-coalition.org
http://www.sf-homeless-coalition.org





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FW: CA: Families, Working Poor Flock To Homeless Shelters This Winte=
r 



----------
From: DaytonBear@aol.com
Date: Fri, 19 Jan 2001 13:37:12 EST
To: undisclosed-recipients:;
Subject: CA: Families, Working Poor Flock To Homeless Shelters This = Winter


Santa Rosa (CA) Press Democrat

Families, Working Poor Flock To Homeless Shelt= ers This Winter

December 6, 2000

By MARIA BROSNAN LIEBEL
THE PRESS DEMOCRAT

Sonoma County's robust economy has not been kind to the jobless and working=
poor who are struggling to find affordable housing in the face of rising rents.

John Records, executive director of the Committee on the Shelterless, also =
known as COTS, said the 35-bed family shelter is full and the adult winter =
shelter at the Petaluma Swim Center is close to capacity early in the seaso= n.

Records said the family shelter on Petaluma Boulevard South is turning away=
record numbers of families for lack of space.

"On average, we turn away twice as many families as we have room for,&= quot; he
said.

Even working families are homeless, caught in the squeeze of rising rents, =
Records said.

Cold, rainy weather prompted the seasonal shelter for adults to open a coup= le
of days early this year, Oct. 30 instead of the customary Nov. 1.

"Our census is in the 40s now, which is probably a little high for thi= s time
of year," Records said of the winter shelter, which sleeps about 54, <= BR> including two staff members.

When the shelter fills up, people are given bus tickets to go to a larger <= BR> shelter in Santa Rosa, Records said.

Winter shelter guests must be members in good standing of the Petaluma
Opportunity Center on Payran Street, which offers daytime services and
programs to the homeless.

Priority is given to those members who have made the strongest commitment t= o
improving their lives within the Stepping Stones program, Records said.
Stepping Stones offers different levels of service for members who agree to=
certain criteria, such as attending classes and drug testing.

The sick also have priority.

"There are people who are shockingly ill who are on the street" w= ith serious,
incurable problems, Records said.

People with heart conditions, colostomies and amputated toes are among thos= e
served by the Opportunity Center this year.

Everyone is tested for tuberculosis. Petaluma Valley Hospital and the
Petaluma Health Care District offer on-site medical visits, Records said. <= BR>
Winter shelter guests sleep on mattresses on the floor of two locker rooms.=
Some rest in the shower stalls that are slightly divided and offer more privacy.

About 25 percent of the shelter guests are female, a higher percentage than=
that at most winter adult shelters. Records believes women feel safe there =
because the leadership of the program and the winter shelter are female.
The budget for operating the winter shelter this year is $60,000 in cash, <= BR> plus in-kind donations and free rental of the city-owned Swim Center.

Records said the shelter is seeking donations.

One important need is for volunteers to provide hot meals for about 50 peop= le
on Monday nights. Records said individuals, churches and community-service =
groups can make one dish or an entire meal. To help with food, call Mary Isaak at 762-8097.

Blankets, sheets and pillowcases also are needed. Donors may contact Michel= le
Baynes at 765-6798 or e-mail her at Michelle@cots-homeless.org.


Copyright =A9 2000 The Press Democrat


--
END FORWARD

**In accordance with Title 17 U.S.C. section 107,
this material is distributed without charge or profit
to those who have expressed a prior
interest in receiving this type of information for
non-profit research and educational purposes only.**

***********************************************************
9000+ articles by or via homeless & ex-homeless people
Year 2000 posts
INFO & to join/leave list - Tom Boland
<wgcp@earthlink.net>
Nothing About Us Without Us -
Democratize Public Policy
***********************************************************
--
STREET SHEET
A Publication of the Coalition on Homelessness, San Francisco
468 Turk Street
San Francisco, CA 94102
415 / 346.3740 - voice
415 / 775.5639 - fax
streetsheet@sf-homeless-coalition.org
http://www.sf-homeless-coalition.org



--MS_Mac_OE_3062774729_6469194_MIME_Part--