[Hpn] Fwd: 'action basic' curric.

Coalition on Homelessness, SF coh@sfo.com
Sun, 23 Jul 2000 23:31:42 -0700


>Date: Sat, 22 Jul 2000 08:44:34 -0700 (PDT)
>From: Andrew Rose <affirmingandy@yahoo.com>
>Subject: 'action basic' curric.
>To: talk@quiet.org
>X-Original-Envelope-From: affirmingandy@yahoo.com
>
>
>
>of interest to some is the sketch of what's getting trained in the 4 hour
>'action basic' - this has already gone through some revisions not noted here,
>but the idea is that the people will go through the experience to 
>build a sense
>of group and to acknowledge differences around the issue of property damage,
>opinions about violence/nonviolence, reacting to police violence, race issues
>(DC police were all african american), building affinity groups etc.
>
>this is from training for change 215 729 7458
>
>
>1. Introductions.:
>					30 min
>
>	As they arrive, (1) ask people to sit in affinity groups if
>they came with one.  If		they didn't come with one, sit in
>designated area, because they can expect to find an	affinity
>group while at this training.  (2) sit on the designated
>	side "OK to be videotaped" "Not OK to be videotaped"
>
>	Go-round: purpose for being at the RNC demos
>	Agenda review, including goals of the training (Workshop
>Goals: prepare for action, deepen			solidarity),
>logistics, address the concern about confidentiality regarding media:
>		(a) no media allowed during section which explores
>			attitudes toward property destruction
>		(b) people who don't want to be included in video
>			filming sit on one side of the room.  (Allow
>			time for re-arrangement of seating.)
>
>2. Conflict exploration
>				30
>
>	Parallel lines roleplay on the following scenario:
>	An angry police officer hassles a demonstrator.  How should the
>		demonstrator respond?
>
>	Debrief outline of questions:
>		(1) [To the persons playing the demonstrator or
>person concerned for				safety]:  What were
>your feelings?
>		(2) [To these same persons]: What in your response
>seemed to work in				terms of your
>purposes stated in the beginning of this workshop?
>		(3) [To the persons playing the angry ones]: What was
>at all effective in
>			getting through to you?
>
>	Review learnings with assistance of flipchart.
>
>
>3. Spectrum on property destruction 
>			           25
>	Two poles:  #10 is "Property destruction is great/ let's look
>for chances
>		to do it."
>		#1 is "Never do property destruction -- it's wrong."
>	Conduct interviews from different parts of the line.
>	Debrief:  It's great to see so many views.  As it happens, in
>this set of demonstrations there is agreement not to have property
>destruction.  Remarkable that an agreement could be reached given
>such diversity of views.  So however you personally feel about the
>value of property destruction -- and there's really no time to debate
>that here -- for this particular series of demos folks have managed
>to agree on a policy.
>
>
>4. Nonviolent action
>			              35
>	OPTION A:
>	Presentation -- Principles of NVA  (Amy Steffen's)	     10 min.
>	In buzz groups:  Which of these speak to you?   How?
>			       Which of them don't?  How?	      15 min.
>	Whole group: Sample from buzz groups, w/ newsprint,
>			adding points for thought		      10 min.
>
>		Ideas to add if needed:
>		        -	NVA often functions in the way a
>"pushy" friend would,
>			reminding you that the problem isn't going away,
>			clarifying that you can't put this off but
>have to deal with
>			the change that will improve your life.
>		         - What are the goals of these demonstrations?
>			Does anyone think that these demos will
>change the world?
>			In the middle of demo any of us can lose
>perspective and feel			that a little more militancy
>will shift the world!
>		         - Volatile situations often go better when
>many people in the			nonviolent side have already
>agreed to a code of conduct --
>			they often have more unity and get more
>respect.  Here's a
>			code of conduct that many people here agree
>with.  Can you
>			agree with it?		Handout Action Guidelines
>		       
>
>	OPTION B:
>	Pros and Cons of Nonviolent action - Ambivalence chart
>		35
>
>Put in center of large newsprint, at top, "Nonviolent action."
>Explain that, as with so many concepts, there is an up side and a
>down side to nonviolent action, and that the group will explore this
>together.  Place + at the top of a left column and - at the top of a
>right.  Invite group to suggest pluses and minuses.  Faithfully
>record.  Toward the end of the lists it's OK to add any ideas that
>have been missed, if you can do that without a tone of moral urgency.
>(What makes this exercise effective is to focus on information that
>assists people to make up their own minds.)
>
>When lists are reasonably complete (keeping track of time), ask the
>group to study them and to make generalizations.  Allow brief
>discussion.
>		Possible ideas to add if needed:
>		        -	Strategic NVA often functions in the
>way a "pushy" friend			would, reminding you that the
>problem isn't going away,
>			clarifying that you can't put this off but
>have to deal with
>			the change that will improve your life.
>		         - What are the goals of these demonstrations?
>			Does anyone think that these demos will
>change the world?
>			In the middle of demo any of us can lose
>perspective and feel			that a little more militancy
>will shift the world!
>
>To sum up, point out that the April demonstrations in Washington,
>D.C. were able to maintain a lot of coherence and unity because of
>"Action Guidelines" they agreed to.
>Volatile situations often go better when many people in the
>progressive side have already agreed to a code of conduct --they
>often have more unity and get more respect.  Would you be able to go
>along with this code?  
>				Hand-out Action Guidelines
>
>
>5. Conflict exploration: police/demonstrator tension - roleplay
>			20
>
>	An angry demonstrator taunts police who are lined up
>		shoulder-to-shoulder in front of a store.  You are concerned
>		for safety and nonviolence.  What do you do?
>	Debrief:  As in # 2 above.  ADD:
>		What difference does it make that in Philadephia the
>police are mainly
>			black and the angry activists in these demos
>may be mainly white?
>			HANDOUT
>
>6. PRIOR TO BREAK:
>
>	Pass out Affinity Groups hand-out.  Ask people during the
>break to join others
>	to make affinity group.
>
>       BREAK.
>					15
>	Ask people to sit in affinity groups when they return.
>
>
>7. Quick decisions exercises
>				20
>
>         (a) One of your affinity group members
>		"loses it" & yells "Fuck the
>		police!"
>         (b) Your affinity group is leading a
>	march and turn the corner and police
>	are blockading the street:  what to do?
>       
>	In debrief, point out power of collectivity and then raise
>the concept of jail	solidarity.  Urge participants to go to that
>workshop.
>
>
>
>
>8. Direct action roleplay:  whole group.  Note that there will be
>special training for	    20	blockades -- urge those who are
>interested to go there also.
>
>	Who's been arrested before?  Those play the role of police.
>	A couple of affinity groups can be arrestees while in their
>affinity groups.
>	Others can be non-arrestees, journalists, safety-keepers, etc.
>
>	Once they are grouped by roles, brief each group separately.
>
>	In the final roleplay directions, announce that if anyone is
>accidentally getting
>		hurt, yell "Stop" and facilitators will stop the roleplay.
>
>	Debrief:  (a) feelings, (b) learnings
>
>
>9. Closing
>
>
>
>			Time:  3 hrs. 25 min.
>
>
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