[Hpn] Shelter survey report: SHUT OUT... part 4

Terri McDonald mickeyde@cybercomm.net
Sun, 24 Dec 2000 22:39:30 -0500


Please remove me from the list.
----- Original Message -----
From: Lucinda Houston <lucy@efn.org>
To: <hpn@lists.is.asu.edu>
Sent: Sunday, September 24, 2000 8:28 PM
Subject: Re: [Hpn] Shelter survey report: SHUT OUT... part 4


> Well, I can say one thing... and that is I learned from typing in the
> UNIVERSAL DECLARATION OF HUMAN RIGHTS is that we (each of us) are entitled
> to a roof over our head.  That human dignity is the prime factor of our
> existence, and that we should all be treated with respect that reflects
our
> value as being human.  (aspiration of mankind).
> We don't want children to think that this life is just hell and hardship,
> one injury (hurt and disgrace) after another.
> It took people, thoughful people, to WRITE in that declaration.  Written
> words are binding.  They are created of thought, reflection, and words.
> Written, articulated words become LAW.  Law is whatever we create and /or
> enforce.  (In Articulated words and by democratic vote).
> That is another reason why it is important to vote.
> Start listenin to miss gripe, gripe, gripe.
> Listen up.
> I want you to read the Universal Declaration of Human Rights.  I won't cap
> it all this time, that is too offensive.  It was capped, because it was
> worthy of attention.
> It was real.  If there are any words you don't understand, LOOK THEM UP.
> Words, serve a very important purpose.  Learn them, they will lead you to
> freedom and happiness, I believe.
> There were petitions passed around here, recently.  They were petitions to
> get an initiative on the ballot in November, calling for a vote on
> Marijuana.  They needed signatures, lots of them, in order to get this
> initiative on the November Ballot.
> It would have allowed Oregon voters to vote on the "legalization" of
> marijuana, going just a little further than medical marijuana, and
allowing
> it to be sold in liquor stores (which are controlled) to over 21, adults
> only.
> Factors.  66 thousand some signatures (valid ones) were needed to get the
> initiative on the ballot.  78 thousand or so were collected.  45 thousand
> turned out to be valid.  What does that tell you?  It tells me that 1)
> people in these circles think think they can out smart the system (not).
2)
> that we're all a bunch of idiots, and ignorant (so)  3)  and that we need
> some REAL education regarding voting and voting matters.
> It won't be on the ballot.  What a waste of the $30, 000 dollars that
people
> pitched in towards the goal (conventional wisdom told the initiators that
it
> would take $50, 000 dollars), and what a waste that we are so darn
unaware.
> Sure, you like jail time and money penalties, because you just don't have
> the time or inclination to register to vote.
> What you may and may not know about voting. . .
>
>
>
>
>
> -----Original Message-----
> From: Coalition on Homelessness, SF <coh@sfo.com>
> Date: Sunday, September 24, 2000 4:47 PM
> Subject: [Hpn] Shelter survey report: SHUT OUT... part 4
>
>
> >continued from part 3
> >
> >Exits
> >
> >"To exit homelessness, people need homes. "
> > 36 year old African American Male
> >
> >Individuals were asked how shelter residents would exit shelters and
> >homelessness in their ideal shelter. The frank responses in this
> >section strongly indicate that homeless people know exactly what it
> >would take to end homelessness. In sum, they needed affordable
> >housing and income the most, as well as other kinds of services for
> >some individuals.
> >
> >Permanent Affordable Housing
> >The most common response by far was the need for permanent affordable
> >housing to be available.  Two hundred and twenty-nine respondents
> >(56%) identified this as their primary necessity.  Many respondents
> >defined affordable as 30% or less of a person's income - indicating
> >that housing must be affordable to even the poorest residents.
> >
> >"Now there is a rotating door. Have people sign up for Section 8
> >housing as soon as they get into the shelter. I thought this was
> >supposed to be a place to help you."
> > 45 year old white female
> >
> >"Need HUD housing, not slum hotels. They are roach infested, rat run
> >hotels that the city knows about."
> > 55 year old African American male
> >
> >Living Wage Jobs
> >The second critical necessity that individuals needed in order to
> >exit homelessness was living wage jobs. 225 respondents indicated
> >living wage jobs or training, education and placement as a
> >prerequisite to exiting homelessness.
> >
> >There were several other items people viewed as necessary to exit
> >homelessness, however these numbers drop significantly. These
> >included the need for supportive housing (63 respondents), and
> >transitional housing (51 respondents). Another important need
> >identified was money management services, with 33 seeing this as a
> >necessity before they could exit homelessness. Mental health
> >treatment (37 respondents) and substance abuse treatment (62) were
> >also seen as important.
> >
> >Such results indicate that, while many respondents are in need of
> >support services to assist them in transitioning from homelessness,
> >their primary necessity is simply an affordable place to live and a
> >job.
> >
> >The following is a list of numbers and percents of responses to what
> >homeless respondents would need in order exit homelessness.
> >
> >Housing 238 63%
> >Living wage jobs 225 60%
> >Supportive Housing 63 23%
> >Substance Abuse Treatment 62 17%
> >Referrals and linkages 53 14%
> >Transitional Housing 51 14%
> >Mental Health Treatment 37 10%
> >Money Management 33 9%
> >
> >less than 5% had these responses:
> >
> >Longer Shelter Stays 11 3%
> >Information on services 7 2%
> >Help become part of broader community 7 2%
> >Aftercare 6 2%
> >Self Help 6 2%
> >Relocation Assistance 6 2%
> >Case Management 6 2%
> >Shorter stays 4 1%
> >Family reunification 3 1%
> >Medical assistance 2 1%
> >Phone and voicemail 2 1%
> >Home ownership 1 0.27%
> >
> >
> >Embracing Culture
> >
> >"The system is racist, not because of the color of out skin, but
> >because we are homeless."
> > 50 year old African American male
> >
> >"Respect for different cultures should be a requirement."
> > 23 year old White / Native American / Japanese male
> >
> >Learn not to be prejudiced. Ignorance breeds prejudice. Teach about
> >different cultures."
> > 50 year old African American female
> >
> >Respondents were asked how people's different cultures should be
> >respected within the shelter system. In general, respondents felt
> >there should be respect for all cultures and that racism,
> >discrimination and favoratism should not be tolerated. This section
> >differed from other parts of the survey in that elsewhere there was a
> >focus mainly on the staff as problematic. In this question, it became
> >clear that both staff and clients could benefit from work cultural
> >competency. Many suggestions included training and various vehicles
> >of communication, and that such activities would promote
> >understanding and a sense of community in the shelters.
> >
> >Respect for Different Cultures
> >175 respondents or 50% responded that there should be a general
> >respect for people's various cultures. Most respondents believe
> >different cultures should be honored, promoted and encouraged by both
> >staff and clients.
> >
> >Staff Should Speak Multiple Languages
> >116, or 33% felt that staff persons should speak the languages of
> >those that they served, or that they should have translation services
> >available. Given the diversity of San Francisco, this is hardly a
> >surprising need.
> >
> >Diverse Staff
> >91 or 26% felt that a diverse staff is important. Some answering this
> >way said that this diverse staff should be sensitive, others said
> >that they should encourage openness, and others said that a more
> >diverse staff may succeed in engaging those who otherwise might not
> >be reached.
> >
> >Cultural Activities
> >20% of respondents recognized the value of cultural activities in
> >expressing one's culture as well as promoting cross-cultural
> >understanding.  71 people responded that there should be activities
> >such as art, entertainment, ethnic food, presentations, films and
> >books (and these in languages other than English).
> >
> >The numbers and percents of responses to how people's cultures could
> >be respected was as follows:
> >
> >Respect for Different Cultures 176 50%
> >Staff should speak multiple languages 116 33%
> >Diverse Staff 91 26%
> >Cultural Activities 71 20%
> >Information/Training in Multiple Languages 62 18%
> >No Racism, Discrimination, Racial Slurs, etc. 37 11%
> >Diversity Training of Staff and Clients 36 10%
> >Everyone Treated Equal 36 10%
> >Cultural Support Groups 24 7%
> >
> >less than 5% had these responses:
> >
> >Honor Religious Desires   9 3%
> >Separate Spaces for sub-populations   7 2%
> >Self-Governing   6 2%
> >Not Necessary   5 1%
> >Fire/Don't Hire Staff Who Discriminate   5 1%
> >Immigration Services   2 1%
> >Teach Other Languages   2 1%
> >Employ Residents   1   0.28%
> >Less Institutional   1   0.28%
> >No Segregation   1   0.28%
> >Respect of Confidentiality   1   0.28%
> >
> >
> >Seniors and People with Disabilities
> >
> >"If you have a medical condition and have to go to the hospital, you
> >shouldn't lose your bed."
> > 60 year old African American female
> >
> >"Make allowances for people with disabilities, be able to bend rules
> >such as length of stay."
> > 42 year old African American male
> >
> >
> >Many respondents commented that seniors and people with disabilities
> >should not even be in shelters. Many commented that they should be in
> >permanent housing or long-term shelters in the interim. If they are
> >in the general shelters, many felt they should have priority in the
> >lottery and special areas within the shelters. Although there were a
> >few respondents who felt that neither seniors nor those with
> >disability should get any special treatment, the vast majority showed
> >great compassion for those with special needs. It is important that
> >there is some consideration for this population, based on the fact
> >that the elderly population is a considerable part of the city's
> >population and a rapidly growing segment of the general population as
> >a whole.
> >
> >Staff Training
> >The most common response be far, was the need for staff training.
> >135, or 38% responded that the staff should have special training on
> >how to work with seniors and people with disabilities, or be
> >qualified to work with this population. Some also mentioned that
> >staff should be trained on issues relevant to veterans, some of whom
> >are seniors and/or have disabilities.  Some who responded this way
> >also suggested that the staff be trained in mental health issues for
> >this population.
> >
> >
> >
> >Separate Shelter for Seniors
> >113, or 32% suggested that there should be separate shelters for
> >senior citizens. Some who responded this way brought up issues of
> >safety, of comfort, and of disrespect for elders by younger clients.
> >Generally, there is understanding that seniors have different needs
> >than the general population.
> >
> >Separate Shelter for People with Disabilities
> >100 respondents or 28%, responded that there should be separate
> >shelters for those with disabilities. Reasons for this response were
> >often due to accessibility issues, or to concerns that they get the
> >services they need.
> >
> >Physical Accessibility
> >Many were concerned about the compliance with the ADA.  82
> >respondents, or 23% expressed concern in the general area of
> >accessibility.  There were concerns that there is not full access to
> >the existing facilities, that the showers, toilets etc. are not
> >accessible.
> >
> >Medical Assistance
> >69, or 20% of the respondents felt that a wide range of medical
> >services should be available on site for seniors and people with
> >disabilities.  Some of the specific issues raised were refrigerated
> >medication storage; assistance getting to medical appointments;
> >services such as rehabilitation, medical assistance, first aid, and
> >speech therapy offered on-site; and special supplies available, such
> >as Depends.
> >
> >The following is a list of how respondents thought seniors and people
> >with disabilities should be served by the shelter system:
> >
> >Staff Qualified/Trained on Issues 135 38%
> >Separate Shelter for Seniors 113 32%
> >Separate Shelter for People with Disabilities 100 28%
> >Physical Accessibility 82 23%
> >Medical Assistance 69 20%
> >24-Hour Advise Nurse 58 17%
> >Flexible Hours and Policies for Seniors/PWD 55 16%
> >Priority Placement of People with Special Needs 51 15%
> >Special Diet 50 14%
> >Support Services 38 11%
> >Multi-Service with Separate Spaces 33 09%
> >Telephone Service 19 05%
> >
> >less than 5% had these responses:
> >
> >Permanent Housing 15 04%
> >Transportation Assistance 14 04%
> >Email/Voicemail Service 11 03%
> >Safety Monitoring 11 03%
> >Equal (not special) Treatment 8 02%
> >Clear Rules 1 0.28%
> >Self Help 1 0.28%
> >Screening Before Entry 1 0.28%
> >
> >
> >A big warm thank you to all of those who made this study possible:
> >
> >Survey Takers:
> >
> >Able Zerfiel
> >Miguel Cuevas
> >Eric Enriques
> >Eduardo Palomo
> >Robert Williams
> >Mariana Viturro
> >Bridgette Peltekof
> >M.C. Ettinger
> >Larry
> >Delphine Brody
> >John Wilson
> >chance martin
> >Sara Gorman
> >Wendy Phillips
> >Arnette Watson
> >Dan Mcuew
> >Mel Beetle
> >James LaPoint
> >L.S. Wilson
> >Allison Lum
> >Robert (Bob) Williams
> >Jennifer Friedenbach
> >Ron Rucker
> >Lance Bartels
> >Miguel Carrera
> >Nancy Esteva
> >Scott Clark
> >Francisco
> >Whirlwind Dreamer
> >John Melone
> >Thomas Batdorf
> >Kathleen Gray
> >Anthony Camel
> >Adam Arms
> >Mara Raider
> >Angelique Gonzales
> >Sonia
> >Mary Kerles
> >Cheryl Johnson
> >Rodd Walton
> >Dennis Deasy
> >Cecilia Valentine
> >Benjamin Johnson
> >
> >Writers:
> >
> >chance martin
> >Allison Lum
> >Jennifer Friedenbach
> >Wendy Phillips
> >Ceclia Valentine
> >John Malone
> >Mark Huelskotter
> >Mara Raider
> >
> >Thanks to our volunteer translators:
> >
> >Mariana Viturro
> >Angelique Gonzales
> >Tan Chow
> >Miguel Cuevas
> >Angela Chu
> >
> >
> >And our deepest appreciation to all the homeless people we surveyed,
> >and everyone else who helped make this effort possible.
> >
> >
> >
> >
> >
> >***********************************************************
> >8000+ articles by or via homeless & ex-homeless people
> >INFO & to join/leave list - Tom Boland <wgcp@earthlink.net>
> >Nothing About Us Without Us - Democratize Public Policy
> >***********************************************************
> >_______________________________________________
> >--
> >Coalition on Homelessness, San Francisco
> >468 Turk St.
> >San Francisco, CA 94102
> >vox: (415) 346.3740
> >Fax: (415) 775.5639
> >coh@sfo.com
> >http://www.sfo.com/~coh
> >
> >_______________________________________________
>
>
> _______________________________________________
>