[Hpn] protests

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Mon, 21 Aug 2000 22:56:56 -0400


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PROTESTERS
Youth at rallies bypass Los Angeles homeless=20

By Cindy Rodriguez, Globe Staff, 8/20/2000=20


OS ANGELES - Chad Cordell is the face of the youth power movement. He's =
liberal, in college, loves rock, and he's here, as some young people =
say, to rage against the machine.=20


Thirty years ago, his father protested against the Vietnam War. Now his =
dad is a radiologist living in West Virgina.=20


''He had a dream of working on an Indian Reservation. But he never did. =
I'm not sure why,'' Cordell, 21, said.=20


His parents are complacent, he says. But he says he will never be.=20


Wearing a yellow bandanna around his neck, and jeans that droop past his =
navel, Cordell represents a core group among the thousands of other =
young people who descended on this city for four days of rallying.=20


They are the children of '60s protesters, a new generation of =
middle-class college students who say it's their turn to revolt. They =
stick out among the sea of diverse faces here. Among the middle-aged, =
the yuppies, the Latinos, blacks, and Asians, these white 20-somethings =
make up the majority.=20


They say they want to be the voice for the voiceless. But at places like =
Pershing Square park, a rallying point for demonstrators, it's clear =
that youth like Cordell are uncomfortable reaching out to the poor =
people they say they want to help.=20


Homeless people sitting on park benches watch in bewilderment as the =
protesters, dressed in nouveau-hippie clothing, chant: ''No justice? No =
peace!''=20


''I don't think they care about me,'' said James Johnson, 29, who sleeps =
at night in the park. ''None of them has tried talking to me. Nobody =
asked me how the way I feel.''=20


Another homeless man, who wouldn't give his name, said: ''To me it's a =
racist demonstration. They don't ask us our opinion. They don't even =
talk to us. It's like we're dirty.''=20


Veteran activists like Ted Hayes, a national figure in the homeless =
movement and founder of Dome Village, a homeless community in Los =
Angeles, says he has tried reaching out to the younger activists here, =
but they've rebuffed him.=20


''These kids, by and large, are well meaning, but ignorant,'' said =
Hayes, 49. ''They're here because they feel guilt. They have so much, =
they feel it's wrong to have it. They rebel against their parents, the =
people who gave them what they have. They rebuke it, yet they keep it.'' =



Hayes says every generation of college students goes through this same =
phase. They purposely wear tattered clothing, even though they can =
afford J. Crew. They try to look as different as they can from their =
parents. But they're following the same path, he says.=20


He hopes those who gathered at the Democratic National Convention won't =
end up like their parents, but he says it's likely they will.=20


''When their movement ends, they get to go home,'' Hayes said.=20


But protesters like Micaela Davis, 20, a student at the University of =
California at Berkeley, whose father sells real estate and whose mother =
is a benefits analyst, says she won't let the anger that stirs her =
political passion die.=20


''A lot of people say I'm jumping on the bandwagon. They say we don't =
know what we're protesting,'' Davis said. ''It's true I may not know all =
the details of every issue, but if you don't speak up, you're just going =
along with the system.''=20


She said the reason the majority of the youth protesting are white and =
middle class is because poor people can't afford to take the time off.=20


Also, she said, ''poorer communities have a lack of education about =
issues. They aren't being educated about what's going on politically.''=20


But is she trying to educate them? Has she considered talking to them?=20


No, she says, she hadn't thought of it.=20



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<DIV><FONT size=3D2>
<P><FONT size=3D-1><B>PROTESTERS</B></FONT><BR><WIRE_HEADER><FONT =
size=3D+2><B>Youth=20
at rallies bypass Los Angeles homeless</B></FONT> </WIRE_HEADER>
<P><WIRE_SOURCE><FONT size=3D-1><B>By Cindy Rodriguez, Globe Staff, =
8/20/2000</B>=20
</FONT></WIRE_SOURCE>
<P><WIRE_BODY>
<P><IMG align=3Dleft =
src=3D"cid:006e01c00be4$a1ebad40$badfd49b@oemcomputer">OS=20
ANGELES - Chad Cordell is the face of the youth power movement. He's =
liberal, in=20
college, loves rock, and he's here, as some young people say, to rage =
against=20
the machine.=20
<P>
<P>Thirty years ago, his father protested against the Vietnam War. Now =
his dad=20
is a radiologist living in West Virgina.=20
<P>
<P>''He had a dream of working on an Indian Reservation. But he never =
did. I'm=20
not sure why,'' Cordell, 21, said.=20
<P>
<P>His parents are complacent, he says. But he says he will never be.=20
<P>
<P>Wearing a yellow bandanna around his neck, and jeans that droop past =
his=20
navel, Cordell represents a core group among the thousands of other =
young people=20
who descended on this city for four days of rallying.=20
<P>
<P>They are the children of '60s protesters, a new generation of =
middle-class=20
college students who say it's their turn to revolt. They stick out among =
the sea=20
of diverse faces here. Among the middle-aged, the yuppies, the Latinos, =
blacks,=20
and Asians, these white 20-somethings make up the majority.=20
<P>
<P>They say they want to be the voice for the voiceless. But at places =
like=20
Pershing Square park, a rallying point for demonstrators, it's clear =
that youth=20
like Cordell are uncomfortable reaching out to the poor people they say =
they=20
want to help.=20
<P>
<P>Homeless people sitting on park benches watch in bewilderment as the=20
protesters, dressed in nouveau-hippie clothing, chant: ''No justice? No =
peace!''=20

<P>
<P>''I don't think they care about me,'' said James Johnson, 29, who =
sleeps at=20
night in the park. ''None of them has tried talking to me. Nobody asked =
me how=20
the way I feel.''=20
<P>
<P>Another homeless man, who wouldn't give his name, said: ''To me it's =
a racist=20
demonstration. They don't ask us our opinion. They don't even talk to =
us. It's=20
like we're dirty.''=20
<P>
<P>Veteran activists like Ted Hayes, a national figure in the homeless =
movement=20
and founder of Dome Village, a homeless community in Los Angeles, says =
he has=20
tried reaching out to the younger activists here, but they've rebuffed =
him.=20
<P>
<P>''These kids, by and large, are well meaning, but ignorant,'' said =
Hayes, 49.=20
''They're here because they feel guilt. They have so much, they feel =
it's wrong=20
to have it. They rebel against their parents, the people who gave them =
what they=20
have. They rebuke it, yet they keep it.''=20
<P>
<P>Hayes says every generation of college students goes through this =
same phase.=20
They purposely wear tattered clothing, even though they can afford J. =
Crew. They=20
try to look as different as they can from their parents. But they're =
following=20
the same path, he says.=20
<P>
<P>He hopes those who gathered at the Democratic National Convention =
won't end=20
up like their parents, but he says it's likely they will.=20
<P>
<P>''When their movement ends, they get to go home,'' Hayes said.=20
<P>
<P>But protesters like Micaela Davis, 20, a student at the University of =

California at Berkeley, whose father sells real estate and whose mother =
is a=20
benefits analyst, says she won't let the anger that stirs her political =
passion=20
die.=20
<P>
<P>''A lot of people say I'm jumping on the bandwagon. They say we don't =
know=20
what we're protesting,'' Davis said. ''It's true I may not know all the =
details=20
of every issue, but if you don't speak up, you're just going along with =
the=20
system.''=20
<P>
<P>She said the reason the majority of the youth protesting are white =
and middle=20
class is because poor people can't afford to take the time off.=20
<P>
<P>Also, she said, ''poorer communities have a lack of education about =
issues.=20
They aren't being educated about what's going on politically.''=20
<P>
<P>But is she trying to educate them? Has she considered talking to =
them?=20
<P>
<P>No, she says, she hadn't thought of it.=20
<P></WIRE_BODY></P></FONT></DIV></BODY></HTML>

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